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tarko

caramelized white chocolate with seasalt!

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18 hours ago, Jim D. said:

I think you have forgotten that once upon a time you were aghast that I was not a big fan of Dulcey.

 

And honestly, I'll probably forget again! ūüėä

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Melissa also does an Apricot bonbon which I have used Dulcey in. You could try that with the Cacao Barry

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45 minutes ago, dhardy123 said:

Melissa also does an Apricot bonbon which I have used Dulcey in. You could try that with the Cacao Barry

That is the recipe to which I referred a few posts back--it's why I bought the Cacao Barry. Who am I to question a Melissa recipe, but I found the apricot flavor subdued, and the jasmine tea taste absent. Her use of apricot is what made me think of pairing, for example, an apricot p√Ęte de fruit with a layer of caramelized white.

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On 2/9/2019 at 7:24 AM, julie99nl said:

I made an apple pie bonbon with apple compote in the top, a thin layer of caramelized white ganache with cinnamon added to taste. I used dulcey for the caramelized white. And a crunchy cookie/nut insert.

 

 

 

 

 

This is not a recipe I developed, but I got from my mentor so don't know the origin. I've made it twice and the original recipe with what changed the second time in parenthesis.

 

50 g butter

50 g water (I split this into half water half fresh lemon juice)

20 g cinnamon liquor (I did this once with fireball whiskey and found it too strong tasting, so made it a second time with apple brandy and then added a little cinnamon to the ganache layer)

 

300g firm apples very finely diced (I made it with granny smith for the sour that would balance all the otherwise  sweet)

5-10 gr various apple pie spices. I used some nutmeg, a clove,star anise, and a small amount of fresh grated ginger.

 

simmer on fairly low heat until the apples completely break down and the liquid is nearly gone. Once cool, if it's too chunky, blitz it (immersion blender) to a smaller texture.

 

 

This isn't a long lasting bonbon, though I did not test the AW, but for a one off it was tasty. It might need more experimentation and testing to bring down the AW.

 

 

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@julie99nl, thanks very much for the recipe. It does sound delicious. My followup question was going to be on the shelf life, but you have dealt with that issue. My guess is that the water content is fairly high. Peter Greweling uses "apple compote" in some of his recipes and describes how to make it (which is what your recipe calls for, plus heating the applesauce in the oven until it is as dry as possible--that might help some with Aw).¬†I am already thinking about what might be done to lower the water content. Maybe some invert sugar could be added (but I notice the recipe calls for no sugar beyond what is in the apples and liquor, so that might make it too sweet). For other fruits I have experimented with making a p√Ęte de fruit using Pomona's pectin, which allows the fruit flavor to be more assertive because of the short cooking time required and also requires adding sugar, which will help with shelf life. Unfortunately these ideas will end up¬†masking some of the delicate apple flavor. I do have an excellent French apple "essence" (distilled from the fruit itself) that might help with the flavor. All this is certainly worth more thought. Thanks again for sharing the recipe.

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I thought I would report back. I made the apple filling. I didn't have a liquor with apple flavoring in the house, but used vodka so as to get the effect on Aw of adding liquor. It is not a good time of year (at least in the northern hemisphere) to get flavorful apples, so this was not a taste test. I cooked the apples as much as I could to get rid of all the water I could. The Aw reading was 0.91, which, of course, is high. Jean-Pierre Wybauw writes that a ganache above 0.85 lasts for 3 weeks maximum, but I doubt that he was really envisioning a reading above 0.9 as being that safe.

 

I think I'll try a p√Ęte de fruit using apple pur√©e and dried apples (maybe some fresh as well, but dried usually have a stronger flavor--and obviously less liquid). It's possible to keep some texture to the fruit so as to enhance the sensation of eating apple pie.

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I would suggest you to try microwaving the apples: peel and core the apples, cut them in dices (about 1-1.5 cm), then microwave them at full power for 5 minutes or more (this depends on your microwave and on how much apples you are cooking, so you need to make some tries). I think microwaving is the best way to cook apples, you get better taste than with the other cooking methods, plus you remove a lot of water content (the more you cook them, the more water you loose, obviously). If you are quick there's no need to use some acid to avoid oxidation. You get the best vivid yellow color in this way.

Beware that they keep cooking after you take them out of the microwave, so you need to take them out before reaching the stage of doneness you are aiming for (you need some tries to get ahold of this method).

 

 

 

Teo

 

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