Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Large amount of simple syrup- uses and storage


Tom Gengo
 Share

Recommended Posts

HELP. Catered a mid-day, outside wedding Sat. Here in Charleston the temps were in the high 90's and over 90% humidity. The head count was 175, so I brewed 25 gallons of unsweetened tea (18 oz per person) to ensure everyone stayed hydrated. Since most here in the South drink sweetened tea I made a simple syrup to mix w/ the tea for the sweetened variety. Unfortunately, I have 24 quart canning jars of simple syrup left over... that's right 6 GALLONS OF SIMPLE SYRUP.

Any suggestions for using it? Shelf stability (this is a 10-15 year supply for my cooking barring a barrage of catering gigs soon?) I can use it for brining, which I do frequently, with some simple calculations.

Oh, the guests stayed hydrated on UNsweetened tea, bottled water & lemonade that I also supplied.

Tom Gengo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ferment to alcohol. Then store or enjoy.

What's available to you as a homebrew wine base? (Fruit/flowers/etc)

Then sugar (check), water (check), yeast ...

And once its made, the wine storage can be at room temp.

I've recently learned of "turbo" yeast - which can take plain sugar syrup to 20% alcohol (something like 40 proof) by fermentation alone. I think the idea is that you only then add the flavouring (and either store or drink) or else, heaven forfend, you might think of concentrating it further before diluting it ...

One example: http://turbo-yeast.com/

Edited by dougal (log)

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rum.

Really? I thought rum was made with molasses or cane juice. Will it still taste rum-like when made with refined sugar?

I didn't say it would be good rum! But there's not a lot of difference between simple syrup and cane syrup that's been pressed from sugar cane -- cane syrup has a little more glucose and some trace vitamins and minerals. (Don't get me started on the definition of "raw" sugar.) The flavor of rum is only partly determined by the sugar or sugar bypoduct that starts the process; yeast strains, fermentation time, distillation technique and aging method contribute significantly.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...