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Heat proof treats with long shelf lives


JAZ
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My nephew is posted in Afghanistan for 6-9 months, and my plan is to send him a box of treats at least once a month while he's there. The problem is that I can't send anything chocolate (because of the heat) and that whatever I send has to have a pretty long shelf life. My first box contained caramel corn with toffee almonds and sweet and spicy walnuts, both of which were well received. Next box, I'm thinking of buttercrunch with salted cashews and macadamia nuts, and probably more walnuts (because he really likes them).

After that, though, I'm stuck. I guess I could try some cookies, but what would be the best candidate? Something like shortbread? Any advice or ideas?

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I had a friend posted in that part of the world and what really went over well were foil or pouch packed Indian foods and bottles of hot sauces. The pouches of foods were different from what was available in the local mess hall or commissary and the hot sauces helped to make the local food in the mess more palatable.

Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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The beef jerky is a good idea -- thanks. I can't send liquids at all, so the hot sauce idea won't work.

Mostly, though, I'm looking for desserts/sweets, because my nephew has a sweet tooth. Although maybe crackers or something like cheese straws would work.

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Mostly, though, I'm looking for desserts/sweets, because my nephew has a sweet tooth. Although maybe crackers or something like cheese straws would work.

You could do home made pretzels (chocolate ones! they won't melt because the choc is in the batter) and dust with cinnamon sugar and maybe experiment to see if chopped walnuts would stick to them...? I know that Maida Heatter's New Book of Great Desserts has a recipe for sweet pretzels (I made them one year as Christmas tree decorations) so that's a possibility... and there's another recipe in that book called Joe Froggers which are huge gingersnap-ish kind of cookies (they're marvelous) - they are meant to be shipped. When my friend's brother was stationed in the area, I made her California fruit bars and California Pecan Bars - basically a blondie with dried fruits (apricots and walnuts were my favorites in that recipe, it is the only time I like walnuts; which brings me to the very addictive version called Pecan Bars.)

PM me to let me know if you need the recipes, if you do not have the books.

Edited by JeanneCake (log)
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Would chocolate cookies work if each one was individually wrapped? I'm also thinking that from time to time, I've run across cookie recipes that consist of cookie dough completely encasing a piece of chocolate before baking; even if the chocolate melts, it would still stay inside the cookie.

I have a friend whose son is stationed in Afghanistan; she regularly sends him jars of salsa. I wonder if whether liquids are allowable, depends upon where the package is being shipped.

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Would chocolate cookies work if each one was individually wrapped? I'm also thinking that from time to time, I've run across cookie recipes that consist of cookie dough completely encasing a piece of chocolate before baking; even if the chocolate melts, it would still stay inside the cookie.

I have a friend whose son is stationed in Afghanistan; she regularly sends him jars of salsa. I wonder if whether liquids are allowable, depends upon where the package is being shipped.

If you're shipping via an APO the rules are the same as sending any other package via USPS. It just needs to be properly packed.

Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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Thanks again for the suggestions. A couple of points: I want to send homemade treats; they don't necessarily have to be sweet, but that's the way I'm leaning. Also, I was told specifically by my nephew that liquids are not allowed. I'm sticking with that.

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