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Tube Pan Cake In a Regular Pan


judiu
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I have a simple recipe for a lemon cake that is suppossed to be baked in a Bundt or Tube (Angel Food) pan, which I do not own. I don't bake enough to warrent buying one unless I HAVE to. Will this recipe work if I just bake it in a regular square pan, or would there be problems due to the lack of internal heat circulation from the center tube? (The recipe is the Lemon Bliss Cake from King Arthur Flour; I'm lousy at links :blush: ) Can one of wonderful bakers help me out, please?

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I tried to do this a couple of days ago with my favourite lemon cake recipe from cookbook 'Dinner at the Authentic Cafe' and had to cook the cake for much longer at a lower temperature. The top of the cake was starting to get quite brown while it was still wobbling in the middle, so after about 40mins I turn the temp down and kept it cooking a good 20 mins more than the standard time.

I wanted one large cake for a birthday, otherwise I would have split the mixture into two loaf pans to get more even cooking.

Lapin

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:wink: Oh, just buy a Bundt pan. They make gorgeous cakes with little effort. :wub:

The only 'problem' is that the designs are so attractive, it's tempting to buy more of them!

:rolleyes: Having amassed a nice selection of regular-sized ones, I recently bought a half-size 6-cup traditional Nordic Ware Bundt and FOUR different 3-cup Kaisercast pans.

And, no, I wouldn't advise trying to make a tubed cake in other types of pans. You could always ask KAF.

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Thanks, all, but right now new purchases are prohibited; I just became unemployed. Maybe I'll borrow one. :wink:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I don't own a bundt cake pan either, though I do own a tube pan, which I rarely use. I have successfully baked a bundt cake recipe in two 9"X5" loaf pans. Would that arrangement work for you? (I usually give the extra loaf to a friend or neighbor, which makes me very popular.) At other times I have halved the recipe and baked it in a single loaf pan. A word of caution, though: as with all baking, there's no guarantee that any of these changes or substitutions will always work.

Some equivalents from the Food Lover's Companion. (Measurements are in inches.)

A 10X3 1/2 Bundt cake pan holds 12 cups.

A 10X4 tube pan holds 16 cups.

8X5 loaf pan holds 6 cups.

9X5 loaf pan holds 8 cups.

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Here it is:

Mrs. Pettigrew's Lemon Cake

2 large lemons

3 Tbsp. sugar, for topping

1/2 cup butter, softened

3/4 cup sugar

2 large eggs, beaten

3/4 cup flour

1 tsp. baking powder *

6 tablespoons milk - or gin

Preheat the oven to 325^F. Grease and line an 8-inch loaf pan with parchment or waxed paper.

Grate the lemon rinds and set aside. Combine the juice of 1 lemon with 3 tablespoons sugar in a bowl and set in a warm place until the sugar dissolves and forms a syrup with the juice.

Cream the butter and the rest of the sugar together until light and fluffy. Add the beaten eggs, a little at a time, beating well after each addition. Stir in the grated lemon rind, flour, and baking powder; beat again thoroughly (the longer you beat, the softer the cake). Add the milk and beat again.

Pour into the prepared pan and bake for at least 1 hour; the cake should spring back when pressed gently in the center. Immediately upon removing the cake from the oven, prick the top with a long, thin skewer (such as a cake tester) and pour the lemon juice-sugar syrup all over the top until completely covered. Cool in the pan to allow the syrup to be soaked up and create a moist and tangy cake.

* When I first found this recipe, there was NO baking powder. I stumbled upon the 'correction' many successful cakes later, so I consider the BP optional!

Edited by baroness (log)
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* When I first found this recipe, there was NO baking powder. I stumbled upon the 'correction' many successful cakes later, so I consider the BP optional!

Were you using self rising flour? I don't see anything but the BP that would contribute to rise.

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I love King Arthur's Lemon Bliss Cake. It's an excellent recipe. I scale it to use 6 eggs and bake it in a 16x4x4 Angel Food Cake Loaf Pan. For your purposes though...I recently baked a pineapple pound cake that was supposed to be baked in a Bundt pan and instead I used 2 - 9"x2-1/2" round cake pans and it worked perfectly. I would guess that using the recipe as written you could do the same. It might be a little too much for a 9x13" but you could use 2 - 8" or 9" square cake pans. Just watch the time and bake it until it's done. I'd set the timer for 30 minutes and then start checking it.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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