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Fresh Shiitake Mushrooms


DanM
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This past Sunday was the first week of the local farmer's market. One farmer had some really beautiful log grown shiitake mushrooms. I don't typically cook with shiitakes, so I am at a loss with them. I need some ideas from the peanut gallery on what dishes I should cook to make the most of these mushrooms.

Thanks!!

Dan

Edited by DanM (log)

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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Simply fried with a bit of butter and soy sauce at the end makes a great side dish.

I like them braised with daikon and pork in dashi, but that feels like more of an autumn dish for me.

You could slice them thinly (discard the stems) and stir-fry them with strips of pork loin and lots of black pepper; serve over rice.

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Simply fried with a bit of butter and soy sauce at the end makes a great side dish.

I like them braised with daikon and pork in dashi, but that feels like more of an autumn dish for me.

You could slice them thinly (discard the stems) and stir-fry them with strips of pork loin and lots of black pepper; serve over rice.

The last one sounds good. We don't eat pork though. I have some really nice turkey thighs in the fridge. Would that work?

Just an example

They are also good in miso soup, clear soup, stir-fries, and much more.

DON'T DISCARD THE STEMS!!

(I'm glad that shiitake is spelled correctly here. I often see it mispelled shitake.)

The stuffed mushrooms sound good, but would it work with ground turkey?

Thanks

Dan

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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DON'T DISCARD THE STEMS!!

oooh...what do you do with the stems?

The last one sounds good. We don't eat pork though. I have some really nice turkey thighs in the fridge. Would that work?

You never know until you try! I bet it would be nice, though. Try and report back?

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Re the stems -- you can make mushroom stock out of them.

Good stuff, especially if you eat a lot of mushrooms. Save the stems (they can be frozen indefinitely), wrap them in cheesecloth or a bouquet garni (or you can just toss them in the pot), immerse in boiling water. Reduce heat and simmer for about one hour. Strain. Use in soup, risotto, sauces, or just about any recipe that calls for vegetable stock.

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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The key to most fungus is to sear on a high heat and get it 'browned' to extract some of the natural nutty flavors you get when using this execution.

Start with evoo & butter - high heat - toss em in, little salt - finish with a bit of pepper, some fresh herbs of your choice (I prefer thyme) and a bit of butter to round it out.

This + crunchy country bread = awesome

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Simply fried with a bit of butter and soy sauce at the end makes a great side dish.

I like them braised with daikon and pork in dashi, but that feels like more of an autumn dish for me.

You could slice them thinly (discard the stems) and stir-fry them with strips of pork loin and lots of black pepper; serve over rice.

The last one sounds good. We don't eat pork though. I have some really nice turkey thighs in the fridge. Would that work?

Just an example

They are also good in miso soup, clear soup, stir-fries, and much more.

DON'T DISCARD THE STEMS!!

(I'm glad that shiitake is spelled correctly here. I often see it mispelled shitake.)

The stuffed mushrooms sound good, but would it work with ground turkey?

Thanks

Dan

I've never had turkey before. It works fine with pork, beef, and chicken, and I guess it will work with turkey, too.

nakji: Did you forget my post? You were the first one who commented on it!

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My favorite preparation of good-quality fresh shiitake is simply to grill them, either over a small charcoal grill, or in a cast iron pan, until they're lightly charred and slightly sweaty. I serve them with freshly grated ginger and good quality soy sauce. When I stayed in a hot spring in Gero, they served each table a log with shiitake growing out of them, and we grilled them ourselves. It was simple and perfect.

A mustard-based sauce can also work well.

If you can spare the effort, it's nice to facet them with a knife, usually in 3 facets. I made just 2 facets in this version: Shishito to Shiitake no kushiyaki

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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