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Roter Weinberg Pfirsich Likor or Red Vineyard Peach Liquer


KD1191
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I didn't see another thread where this question would rightfully fit, so I thought I'd start one.

Has anyone tried the Roter Weinbergpfirsich Likor (Red Vineyard Peach Liqueur) made from the peaches of Germany's Mosel valley? I'd never heard of it, but I'm going to be visiting the region this weekend and was thinking that if it it would be useful as a cocktail ingredient I might bring a bottle or two home.

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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Is it something that could be used as (or modified to be turned into) the elusive "peach brandy" that is said to be the key ingredient of a true Fish House Punch, but no longer seems to exist? For that matter, what ARE people using for peach brandy in Fish House Punch?

Cheers,

Mike

"The problem with the world is that everyone is a few drinks behind."

- Bogart

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Is it something that could be used as (or modified to be turned into) the elusive "peach brandy" that is said to be the key ingredient of a true Fish House Punch, but no longer seems to exist? For that matter, what ARE people using for peach brandy in Fish House Punch?

From what I can find, it seems like it would be too low in proof (~40) to work in something like FHP. Following suggestions elsewhere in this forum, I've used bonded applejack to good effect in place of peach brandy...obviously not the same flavor-wise, but a similar concept/execution.

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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A friend of mine who travels brought me back a bottle of this. I like it, but have found it to be of limited use in cocktails. Think of it as a peach-flavored dessert wine -- sweet, low alcohol (the bottle says 18%) and very fruity. The best use I found for it was in a Bellini-type champagne cocktail.

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I've never tasted Rinquinquin (actually had never heard of it until now), but it sounds as if it's something like a peach version of Lillet or Dubonnet. If that's the case, then no. If I had to liken the red peach liqueur to another beverage, I'd say it's something like Moscato (which to me always tastes of stone fruit).

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  • 2 weeks later...

So, in the Mosel valley town of Cochem, I found two products made from these peaches...a liqueur at 20% and a spirit at 38%. It's hard to tell in this photo, but the liqueur is a purplish red, while the spirit is of course clear. It's been over a week since I sampled them, so I won't try to give any notes in this post. I'll update once I get a chance to crack the bottles. I do recall the proprietress eagerly mixing the two products into a shooter for us, which was quite tasty, but not ideal for getting a hang of the flavors of the individual products.

IMG_3940.jpg

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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Just as a side note, my friend bought the product I got at a place that had a cask of it, so it was decanted into bottles when purchased. Thus, I have no official label, just a tag with the name and alcohol percentage (18%)on it.

I'm interested to hear about the higher proof spirit.

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I find the liqueur very similar to what is described above. Nice bright peach aroma, sweet and syrupy mouth feel. Reminds me a bit of Cherry Herring, but there is a hint of bitterness (the kind I associate with bitter almond, apricot kernels, etc.), which makes me wonder if the pits were involved for a longer period of time/at all. Excited to try it in place of Herring or maybe Apry in a few things...White Tiger's Milk?

The eau-de-vie (or, schnapps might be more correct?) has an aroma that is fruity, but not as bright and somewhat crude...not unlike other rudimentary brandies I've tried (nearest in my memory is the Vietnamese Hibiscus brandy from Son Tinh). There is a definite peachy character but also a burn in the nostrils. As far as flavor is concerned, it's considerably more bitter (though perhaps not inherently so...tasting it side by side with the liqueur) and dry. Their is a nice fruity finish, though. Having a hard time thinking of ideas for this one. Perhaps a simple egg-white fizz?

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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Used the liqueur tonight in a variant of Michael Rubel's Harlan County (the original calls for Buffalo Trace, Lime and Apry)...

Cochem County

2 oz WL Weller Special Reserve

3/4 oz Lemon Juice

3/4 oz Roter Weinberg Pfirsich Likor

1/2 oz Simple Syrup

12 Drops Bittercube Bolivar Bitters (sub 2 dashes of Angostura or something fruitier)

Shake, strain, coupe.

Liked the peach in this quite a bit...was on the sweet side. Might have been able to dial back the simple to 1/4.

Edited by KD1191 (log)

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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  • 6 months later...

s this interchangeable with something like Rinquinquin?

Having just added a bottle of Rinquinquin to the bar, I can confirm that it is nothing like Roter Weinberg Pfirsich Likor. However, their varied peach elements do actually work nicely together...I just made this:

2 oz Sazerac 6 Year Rye

3/4 oz Rinquinquin

1/4 oz Roter Weinberg Pfirsich Likor

1 Barspoon Amaro Nonino

Dash Fee's Whiskey Barrel Bitters

The Rinquinquin brings the peach aroma and some bitterness, while the small amount of Pfirsich Likor still lends plenty of fruity peach flavor. The drink didn't have much depth, so I added the Amaro Nonino after thinking about the Violet Hour's Dogwood Manhattan.

Edited by KD1191 (log)

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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