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Liquid smoke - how do you use it?


nathanm
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I assume Nathan has this all figured out by now, based on the good press liquid smoke received in the books.  As for myself, I had never tried liquid smoke until tonight.  Being an old woman who lives in an apartment, my cookery does not include much barbeque.


 


This afternoon I bought a bottle of Stubb's Hickory.  Putting my nose to the opening it was rather vile.  But then again, raw vanilla extract does not do much for me either.


 


Persevering, I rubbed a chicken thigh with a few drops of Stubb's -- and then with chili spice mix (MC@H p 138), a spice mixture of which I have grown most fond.  There was a Pavlovian response upon entering the kitchen, but after grilling there was not much smoke flavor to be detected.


 


Should I have used more?  Where did I go wrong?


Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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For something completely different ... the Smoking Cap cocktail works quite well with 'fake' smoke if the real stuff isn't available.

 

Be cautious; just a few drops onto the ice cube should do it (I have a spray bottle of manuka smoke flavouring, and it's startlingly strong but fine in this with a gentle squirt on top).  You can always add more.

Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
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Over the decades I have been cooking I have tried liquid smoke many times but never quite cared for the flavor and sometimes during cooking the flavor completely dissipates, leaving no hint of smokiness behind.  Too much and there is an acrid, sharp flavor that is most unpleasant and catches in the throat. 

 

I prefer a different solution.

For some things I use Lapsang Souchong tea because that imparts a wonderful smoky flavor without the harsh flavor I find in liquid smoke.

 

For some foods I use smoked salts.  In fact, I cooked a pot of beans yesterday and used guava-smoked salt to achieve a flavor that is remarkable like the flavor achieved when the beans are cooked with smoked ham hocks.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I have never used it to try to duplicate the flavor of meats that have been smoked.

 

I use LS in stove-top-cooked bean dishes that I want to add a little something extra to. I add it toward the end of cooking.

 

My wife has a recipe in her head for tuna dip which has a bit of LS added. It is always popular.

 

Back to bean dishes, making navy beans with some onion, a bit of garlic and finishing with some Applewood LS is tasty in my book.

Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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I continued my experiments tonight.  As it happened the chicken was turning/had turned, so I used quite a bit of liquid smoke, as well as the same rub with MC chili spice mix.  Not something I would particularly want to serve to company, but eatable.

 

However the liquid smoke was still not apparent in the finished dish.

 

 

Edit:  why is my arm sticky?

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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I will use it in a salmon " log" made with cream cheese and horseradish. Occasionally in a salad dressing. Once in deviled egg filling.

The only recipe I use it in is a faux-smoked salmon spread.

 

During the 1994 Northridge earthquake, everything in my kitchen cupboards landed on the floor and many bottles broke, including the liquid smoke.  Everyone who came in the kitchen afterwards thought there must have been a fire due to the strong smoky smell!

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I sometimes add a drop or two, no more to stock, sauces, and turkey meatloaf.

 

its very strong so a drop or two goes a long way.

 

a long time ago Alton Brown has a show on how to make your own.

 

interesting show, can't imagine anyone going to the trouble to make their own though.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I sometimes add a drop or two, no more to stock, sauces, and turkey meatloaf.

 

its very strong so a drop or two goes a long way.

 

a long time ago Alton Brown has a show on how to make your own.

 

interesting show, can't imagine anyone going to the trouble to make their own though.

You can't?  I can - not because I need LS - I've got a bottle - but just to prove I could do it.  

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After the experiment the other night I noticed my apartment smelled decidedly smoky, as did I at work the next day.  I finished the second piece of chicken tonight reheated in the oven with some store bought barbeque sauce.  Now it tasted of smoke.  (And I would never have suspected it had spoiled.)

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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Instead of calling it "Liquid Smoke" they should have called it "Smoked Liquid".

 

 

No one objects to "Smoked Salt".

 

dcarch

Because you are "smoking" the salt. You are not "smoking" liquid. You are condensing smoke gases into liquid. Hense, liquid smoke. I know you know this mang.

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