Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Darienne

Chocolate tempering using grated cocoa butter

Recommended Posts

Chef Eddy van Damme has a very nice blog which I have just started to follow...that's what I need...more blogs to follow :rolleyes: . Chef Eddy's last post was about tempering chocolate using grated cocoa butter I think I'll try it.

Had anyone tried this technique? Does anyone use this technique regularly? Any opinions, advice, etc? All replies gratefully received.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sometimes use Mycryo which is basically the same. Eddie's procedure is basically the same...1% of weight, 35 degrees, etc.

I have never had any tempering problems using the Mycryo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sometimes use Mycryo which is basically the same. Eddie's procedure is basically the same...1% of weight, 35 degrees, etc.

I have never had any tempering problems using the Mycryo.

Hi David,

Thanks for the answer. Although I have read and heard about Mycryo, I never really addressed my lack of knowledge at the time. The time is now. I do have some LorAnn cocoa butter on hand. Is it good enough to use? Chef Eddy uses Callebaut cocoa butter.

Do you use this method often? All the time? Why or why not?

Thanks. :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Darienne - I know you're still listed as "desperately wanting to" come to the confectionery conference next month - if you can make it, remind me, I have a bunch of Mycryo, I would be more than happy to give you a sample. In the event you can't make it, send me a message with your address, I'll still send you some -

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Bob for your offer but I'm sure I can get some in Canada, through Kerry Beal perhaps. Friends and I are taking a chocolate class from Kerry in May.

Do tell me though...how often do YOU use this technique for tempering and why or why not?

Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sometimes use Mycryo which is basically the same. Eddie's procedure is basically the same...1% of weight, 35 degrees, etc.

I have never had any tempering problems using the Mycryo.

Hi David,

Thanks for the answer. Although I have read and heard about Mycryo, I never really addressed my lack of knowledge at the time. The time is now. I do have some LorAnn cocoa butter on hand. Is it good enough to use? Chef Eddy uses Callebaut cocoa butter.

Do you use this method often? All the time? Why or why not?

Thanks. :smile:

It shouldn't matter what cocoa butter you use. Cocoa butter is the component of chocolate which contains the important crystal structures (beta crystals) which are the "good crystals" required to achieve temper and get a nice shine. Mycryo is a brand of cocoa butter which is "flaked" to make it easy to use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Somebody PLEASE ANSWER MY QUESTION!!! :wacko:

How often do you use this method? Why or why not?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I have a bunch of Mycryo I haven't yet tried it - possibly because I'm "afraid" to - in that I know how to temper my chocolate, I know it works and I dont want to screw it up - yet, I sit on the product - stupid, huh?

Kerry is coming to the conference - I'll give her some to bring back to you -

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I have a bunch of Mycryo I haven't yet tried it - possibly because I'm "afraid" to - in that I know how to temper my chocolate, I know it works and I dont want to screw it up - yet, I sit on the product - stupid, huh?

Kerry is coming to the conference - I'll give her some to bring back to you -

I don't know about the 'stupid' part...surely human. Perhaps you could suggest that to Steve Lebovits as a short chocolate project to try.

And thanks about the Mycryo. That's super of you. I've already told Kerry...not letting anyone off the hook. :laugh:

I am going to try the process with my LorAnn cocoa butter next. If only I could just play at chocolatier all day long... :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How much chocolate (by weight) do you usually temper? I'll make sure you get a good sample to use/try - I've talked to the salesman several times about it - and they tell me using it is super simple and easy - just need to get out of the old comfort zone -

Then he pulled me to the side and said - "Bob - the next time you grill a steak; put Mycryo on both sides of the steak before you grill it - because it makes the best D**n steak you'll ever eat - "

...and now that spring is almost in the air here in DC - well - maybe - ....

Yes - if only we could play in chocolate all day ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes - if only we could play in chocolate all day ...

Sounds good to me.

Usually temper about two pounds if by hand. (Have a Revolation I and so often temper by machine. :hmmm: )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Darienne,

I use it at least 95% of the time. As you know, I do all my tempering by hand so I use this method so I don't have to worry about any unmelted pieces of chocolate. The only time I use the seeding method is when I don't know if I will have enough chocolate to mold, etc so I add the extra pellets to give me more chocolate.

To date, I have not had any problems using either method but using Mycryo (or grated cocoa butter) is alot easier.

Off topic, I have also used Mycryo to saute chicken breasts and they have tasted fantastic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I have a bunch of Mycryo I haven't yet tried it - possibly because I'm "afraid" to - in that I know how to temper my chocolate, I know it works and I dont want to screw it up - yet, I sit on the product - stupid, huh?

Kerry is coming to the conference - I'll give her some to bring back to you -

Don't know if I really want to bring a package of powder on a plane!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK. No problem. I'll ask David Hardy for some. He offered to give me some when we come to your class in May. I just turned him down...but now will just turn him up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[

I am going to try the process with my LorAnn cocoa butter next. If only I could just play at chocolatier all day long... :wub:

Watch out! Mycro is cooca butter, but cocoa butter is NOT Mycro....

To make Mycro you take hot (aprox. 45 C) cocoa butter and spray it on a frozen marble roller in a cold room. In effect, what you have is pure beta 6 crystals.

"Regular" cocoa butter does not go through this treatment and may or may ot be tempered.

I was shown the Mycro technique by Callebaut Pastry Chefs "On tour" here in Vnacouver. It works, and it works quite well, but-tum, erh, well....

You need to have your couverture at almost precisely 35 C, and you need to know your weight of your couverture so you an scale out your 1%.

For me, It' far easier to have my couverture warmed at around 45 C overnight, and when I come in the morning, I seed it and cool it down with regular couverture chips. Very simple, very easy.

I don't know what a kg of Mycro is costing, I'm paying around CDN $15 / kg for "Kessko brand" cocoa butter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watch out! Mycro is cooca butter, but cocoa butter is NOT Mycro....

To make Mycro you take hot (aprox. 45 C) cocoa butter and spray it on a frozen marble roller in a cold room. In effect, what you have is pure beta 6 crystals.

"Regular" cocoa butter does not go through this treatment and may or may ot be tempered.

I was shown the Mycro technique by Callebaut Pastry Chefs "On tour" here in Vnacouver. It works, and it works quite well, but-tum, erh, well....

You need to have your couverture at almost precisely 35 C, and you need to know your weight of your couverture so you an scale out your 1%.

For me, It' far easier to have my couverture warmed at around 45 C overnight, and when I come in the morning, I seed it and cool it down with regular couverture chips. Very simple, very easy.

I don't know what a kg of Mycro is costing, I'm paying around CDN $15 / kg for "Kessko brand" cocoa butter.

Oh... I see... Hmmm.... Thanks, Edward J. Will keep all that in mind. Thanks for your detailed answer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[

I am going to try the process with my LorAnn cocoa butter next. If only I could just play at chocolatier all day long... :wub:

Watch out! Mycro is cooca butter, but cocoa butter is NOT Mycro....

To make Mycro you take hot (aprox. 45 C) cocoa butter and spray it on a frozen marble roller in a cold room. In effect, what you have is pure beta 6 crystals.

"Regular" cocoa butter does not go through this treatment and may or may ot be tempered.

I was shown the Mycro technique by Callebaut Pastry Chefs "On tour" here in Vnacouver. It works, and it works quite well, but-tum, erh, well....

You need to have your couverture at almost precisely 35 C, and you need to know your weight of your couverture so you an scale out your 1%.

For me, It' far easier to have my couverture warmed at around 45 C overnight, and when I come in the morning, I seed it and cool it down with regular couverture chips. Very simple, very easy.

I don't know what a kg of Mycro is costing, I'm paying around CDN $15 / kg for "Kessko brand" cocoa butter.

But - as I read it - the demo linked to in this thread - is all about using plain old cocoa butter grated to do the same thing as mycryo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as the cocoa butter you start with is in temper you will be fine grating it and using it (I think that is what Edward J is getting at). Mycryo is in temper. Other cocoa butter may not be.

More importantly, adding cocoa butter to your couverture will thin it out. This may or may not be desirable (thin shells on mould are good, too thin and they have problems releasing). Repeatedly using this techinuque day in day out means your chocolate has more and more cocoa butter added over time, making it thinner and thinner. May be desirable, but you need to be aware of it.

Also, cocoa butter is expensive, so adding it to the chocoalte you are tempering makes that chocolate more expensive. just worth bearing in mind if you are selling the finished product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DHardy is going to give me a sample of his Mycryo which is very nice.

Also, I phoned this candy and supply store in Pickering and they have bars of cocoa butter. Small bars, about $2.50 a bar...probably tiny bars...but bars nonetheless and that should denote tempered cocoa butter. We'll pick some up next trip west.

The whole matter is more experimentation than anything else. Need to try EVERYTHING.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had forgotten about this option for tempering but used it last night as I really did not want to open a new 2.5kg bag of chocolate just to seed the 1kg I had in the melter. I only had 1 small easter bunny left to make and there was plenty in the melter from the day before to do it; I just needed some way to seed it. I wasn't organised enough at the end of the last session to tip some out while it was still in temper so the whole kilo in the melter had gone completely out of condition.

I do not use cocoa butter a lot so I buy mycryo to save myself trying to prise small lumps out of a very stubborn thick block. Anyway I could remember something from the Callebaut web site that said you should sieve the mycro first to get all the clumps out so I did that and it worked really well.

I used the same method to temper a very small amount of white chocolate for the bunny's eyes and tail and again this worked fine.

So big thank you to Darienne for bringing this up.

Lapin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And thanks to you, Lapin d'or, for taking us through your process using some Mycryo. :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found this thread yesterday and just tried this method using grated cocoa butter. I loved it, and as far as I can tell, everything turned out well. This might become my new #1 method for tempering, as its much faster than more traditional means (I still dont have a Rev... :sad: )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good for you, Pringle. :smile: I have the cocoa butter, but haven't gotten around to using it yet. Best laid plans...

I do love my little Revolation. :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive tried the grated CB method three times now.. twice it worked amazingly well.. one time, not so much. I think I had the chocolate a bit too cool on that run. It was like 89 degrees here and we were cranking the AC for the first time this season, so things inside were a bit cooler than on previous attempts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Resurrecting an old thread. I have been tempering with Mycryo for a couple of years and found it pretty much foolproof... until recently. The last few batches that I have done have been off and I can't figure out why. I am using Cacao Barry Fleur de Cao and CB Lactee Superieure and have had problems with both.

I melt to around 45C (sometimes slightly lower) then cool (stirring occasionally) to 34.5 for dark and 33.5C for milk. Then add 1% Mycryo and stir in thoroughly. Used to work fine but I am now getting streaky dull-looking chocolates. Snaps OK so it seems to be tempered but just doesn't look like it is.

I did find this though when I was looking for help:

With MYCRYO®, 100% pure cocoa butter, tempering becomes an easy task.

(1) Melt the chocolate at 104-113°F/ 40-45°C (microwave, bain-marie or chocolate melter).

(2) Allow the chocolate to cool at room temperature to:

93-95°F / 34-35°C for dark chocolate;

91-93°F / 33-34°C for milk chocolate;

91-93°F / 33-34°C for white chocolate.

(3) Add 1% of MYCRYO® – 10 g for 1 kg.

(4) Mix well until the chocolate reaches its

ideal working temperature:

88-90°F / 31-32°C for dark chocolate;

86-88°F / 30-31°C for milk chocolate;

84-86°F / 29-30°C for white chocolate.

(5) Maintain ideal temperature in order to use

chocolate for final product application.

I haven't been doing step 4, but I would have thought that adding Mycryo at 33.5 - 34.5 and then stirring to mix would have brought the chocolate to pretty near those temps.

Any thoughts would be much appreciated. My Xmas chocolates are looking a bit dull and sad!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Chocolate cake with plums
       
      The first cake I ever dared to bake by myself was a chocolate cake. I have since baked it many times, always using the same recipe, and many times I have spoiled it at the beginning of preparation. It is necessary to cool down the chocolate mixture before adding the rest of the ingredients. On a hot summer day this process is very long, so I accelerated it by putting the pot with the mixture into some cold water in the kitchen sink. Many times, by mistake, I turned on the tap and poured water onto the cooling mixture. In hindsight these situations were amusing, but at the time it wasn't funny.

      This chocolate cake is excellent without any additives. You can enrich it with your favourite nuts or butter icing. Today I added some plums to the top of the cake. It was great and its sweet chocolate-plum aroma lingered long in my home.

      Ingredients (25cm cake tin):
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      3 tablespoons of cocoa
      120g of brown sugar
      15ml of almond milk
      100g of dark chocolate
      1 egg
      1 teaspoon of baking powder
      plums

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Smooth the cake tin with the butter and sprinkle with dark cocoa.
      Put the butter, milk, sugar, cocoa and chocolate into the pan. Heat it until the chocolate is melted and all the ingredients have blended together well. Leave the mixture to cool down. Add the egg, flour and baking soda and mix them in. Put the dough into the cake tin. Wash the plums, cut them in half and remove the stones. Arrange the plum halves skin side down on top of the cake. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Kerry Beal
      It's that time again - I'm the group leader for a group of newly minted Ecole Chocolat grads taking a masters course. This one is in Wieze, Belgium. You may recall my last trip as group leader for Ecole when I took a group to Valrhona in France.
       
      I got my packing done on Sunday - was all prepared, car was to pick me up at 6 pm to drive me to the airport. Got a little suspicious when the child was late getting off the bus from school - the driver said that the highway wasn't moving well. At about 5:15 I got a call from the limo service to say that the car that was coming to get me had moved 2 car lengths in the last 30 minutes. Apparently a car roll over on the westbound lanes of highway had ejected two people into the eastbound lanes and the entire highway was closed in both directions.
       
      So I set out in my own vehicle - which of course had no gas, and needed oil... at least the toll highway got me past the problem.  Airport wants $175/week to park - so a quick text to @Alleguede and he came to fetch my car from the airport to park in his driveway until I return.
       
      So here I sit in the lounge awaiting my departure.
       
      I'm doing the Jet Lag program that I have done several times before that has worked well for me. Overcoming Jet Lag, by Charles F. Ehret and Lynne Waller Scanlon. This involves food and caffeine modification. So for the past 4 days I've been drinking Rooibos Provence throughout the day and between 3 and 4:30 slugging down as much real tea as my bladder can handle! The dietary part consists of alternating days of 'feasting' and 'fasting' with high protein breakfasts and lunches and high carb dinners. I had planned to get the driver to stop at the Tim Horton's at the top of my street to pick up the black coffee that is to be taken at around 6 pm the day of travel - unfortunately as I was driving myself that didn't happen - so when I hit the lounge I drank down two cups of strong black caffeinated coffee - better late than never. I'm not much of a coffee drinker - and particularly not black. Should be good for some palpitations when I start the next part of the program which is to sleep as soon as I get on the plane!
       
      This is a 'fasting day', 800 calories suggested - I left my carb meal until I reached the lounge.
       

       
      ]
       
      One of the two cups of coffee.
       

       
      These are the "Gentlemen Retire to the Library' chocolates that I posted before that I am taking along - port wine PDF and tobacco ganache. I used Sosa tobacco flavouring this time instead of a cigar so I don't have to concern myself with nicotine poisoning.
       
       
       
       
    • By pastrygirl
      I'm watching The Sweet Makers on BBC - four British pastry chefs & confectioners recreate Tudor, Georgian, and Victorian sweets with petiod ingredients and equipment. A little British Baking Show, a little Downtown Abbey. 
       
      Check it it out for a slice of pastry history. 
       
      BBC viewer only available to the U.K., but on this side of the pond where there's a will, there's a way. 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×