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Rez

Parmigiano Reggiano -using the rind

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When it comes to using a grated cheese on pastas and salads, I don't think anything beats Parmigiano Reggiano for flavor. However, when it comes to grating, I find that the rind is so hard that it can't be grated. The cheese is expensive to begin with, but considering the amount of the rind I have to discard, the cost of the useable gratings is almost prohibitive. Mind you, I said almost. Do others share my feelings, or have some of you found a way to utilize the rind?

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OMG you discard the rind???? NO NO NO - throw it into soup! It gives flavour and body to soups esp. vegetable soups. I hoard them. Friends hand them over to me. It's my secret ingredient in loads of soups.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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Ditto to what Anna says. The rinds freeze well, just throw them in a simmering pot of soup, a tomato sauce or even a stew. The extra bonus comes when you pull them out, they're soft and chewy, makes a great nibble for the chef!



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The place I buy my parmesan from actually sells containers of rinds... at full price. I like it in soup too, but sheesh, how about a discount?! There must be some other things to do with it, I guess.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Always in soups, and tomato sauces, but I've been known to put a small rind in baked beans while they are baking.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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A South African friend of Italian descent showed me how to grill the rinds over a gas burner flame. Made a delicious nibble. I've heard that the microwave will work in a similar fashion...

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Using rinds to make a broth-and you can make two broths out of the same rinds, the flavor still comes out- and using that broth instead of chicken stock makes a slammin' risotto, especially for vegetarians.

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Hi all,

I never heard of grilling the rinds before, sounds interesting. Is there anything you need to do when preparing it for the grill?

I use the rind in my Pasta Fagioli.

Cranberry beans (borlotti beans) - cleaned and soaked over night

(or two cans rinsed cannellini beans)

4oz thick cut pancetta diced medium and browned in pan with olive oil

Add 1 chopped onion and 1 chopped celery, cook until softened

add couple of garlic cloves sliced fine, 2 tbl oregano, red pepper flakes and some anchovies (or a bit of paste), cook.

if I'm using canned beans I'll sometimes add some ground beef that was cooked/drained in a separate skillet at this stage. (The real beans, that have soaked overnight, really seem to stand up well without the meat. But I've found the canned beans could use some help from added beef)

add 1 whole can of San Marzano tomatoes (DOP), smash a bit and cook

add parmesean cheese rind and cranberry beans, simmer 15 min

add 4cups chicken stock, simmer (reducing) for 2 hours (add water if necessary)

sometimes I add ditalini pasta but not always. I cook my pasta separately, so the leftovers keep better.

salt and pepper to taste.

Pull the cheese rinds, turn off heat. Add some roughly chopped parsley and serve in a bowl adding any cheese on top, drizzle with a good olive oil.

take care,

dan

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Cut them up and steep in EVOO (with other aromatics, if you want) for a while; great dressing base.

Use a microplane on the rinds then soak the shavings with olive oil for a nice condiment:

gallery_42214_4635_34700.jpg


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

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I love the stuff and can eat it like maple syrup candy honestly, but if that doesn't suit your fancy and you don't cook soups that often, it is a great dog treat, same rules apply however to the size of the bone and size of dog. beware of the lactose intolerant canine however

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I always have a bag of rinds in the freezer. They go into tomato sauces. Parm rinds are like flavor bombs for a marinara or ragu. My local cheese shops (as already mentioned) sell rinds FULL PRICE. So obviously, they have value.


Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

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