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Best Terrine Mold


mr drinkie
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I am looking around for a good terrine mold and have found the Le Creuset one for about $150 and some metal ones for about half that price, but does anyone know (1) how the regular metal ones perform versus the LC enameled cast iron ones and (2) are there good terrine molds out there that I am missing? Any recommendations? It just seems that there should be cheaper ones out there somewhere? I wish I had bought one when I lived in France.

k.

I like to say things and eat stuff.

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Eventually, I would like to do both, but right now I am mainly considering rustic French meat terrines like this one. The metal meat loaf pans will probably work well with that, but I also want to try this recipe from Saveur.

I guess I was wondering if the cast iron will heat more evenly and handle gelatin-based terrines better.

k.

I like to say things and eat stuff.

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Blether, thanks for the reply.

After some additional research. I have decided that cast iron/enamel terrine molds probably heat more evenly -- though I can't say for sure. That is what a couple reviewers have said on Amazon at least, but there are so few reviews it is hard to say.

If I felt that I would only be 'trying' terrine out, then maybe a tin pan would suffice at first, but as I have lived in France for some time and love rustic terrines, I think I will continue to make them. (I could be wrong though.) I just remember seeing all those different terrines in a row and choosing as if it were candy. It is hard to go back.

I still don't know if gelatin will be greatly affected by tin versus cast iron, but I assume that the Le Creuset will do a sufficient job (at a much higher cost). Also, I will be in Chicago this weekend and maybe I will find a kitchen store that has the mold on display, and I can ask a few questions then.

Anyhow...if anyone has used this pan, I would still appreciate some feedback.

Thanks in advance.

k.

I like to say things and eat stuff.

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I've been a terrine maker for years and I heartily recommend the collapsible ones; just a regular loaf pan and you risk not being able to get it out cleanly. I personally don't like the Le Creuset unless it is one that I am going to serve from the pan, but the pics you provided are fully removed and would be better suited to a collapsible model. This kind has been used for years and is similar to some of the models I use.

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The LeCreuset does look wonderful for presentation.

But it lengthens cooking I'd say. Longer to heat and cool.

And of course I worry about scratching the interior enamel.

Great feature (a terrine essential, I'd say) is the little hole in the lid for my thermometer probe. I use a thing with a wire between the probe and the (outside the oven) display.

Cook to a chosen core temperature, with the bath only slightly hotter.

I've just bought a small silicone terrine from Mastrad. Seems ideal for things that are going to be turned out.

French description http://www.cuisinstore.com/terrine-silicone

UK source http://www.comet-accessories.co.uk/accessories_online/fiche.cfm?cat_id=129&produit_id=146968&affil=7554D6D530488ACB286435BB3C1B8937&xtor=AL-1

Silicone is super-easy to store (crushable), and is MUCH cheaper than cast iron.

But you might not always want to present your efforts IN the terrine ...

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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Thanks, for the replies. I like the prices on these options a lot better, and I am not really interested in serving out of the dish, so I am ruling out the Le Creuset for now.

I also see that there is a non-stick version of the same collapsible mold, are there any advantages/disadvantages to non-stick (other than it being non-stick). Will terrines brown differently around the edges?

I also like the silicone option, but boy is it hard to find in the US. I can locate the stand-alone silicone bake pan, but not the terrine option with the cover and press. I may have to order it from Europe. I thought the video of the silicone pan in use from this site inspiring.

Thanks again.

k.

I like to say things and eat stuff.

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... I can locate the stand-alone silicone bake pan, but not the terrine option with the cover and press. I may have to order it from Europe. I thought the video of the silicone pan in use from this site inspiring.

Note that the press is not included - it is a €5 extra http://www.cuisine-french.com/cgi/mdc/l/en/boutique/produits/mas-presse_terrine.html and its only available for the small size (500 grams, just over 1 lb).

That video is also linked from the french page that I linked above. Neat video, really "sells the sizzle" doesn't it? :smile:

But I must admit that though I'd seen it a few times before, I hadn't previously noticed that the press was being left in the terrine for cooking, and turning out, and then being used as a cutting stand ...

Edited by dougal (log)

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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I have the le creuset mold. I have nothing negative to say about it. However I am now wishing I had a metal one with straight vertical sides and a removable bottom. Lately I have been doing terrine en croute and it is very hard with the standard cast iron molds.

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Collapsible moulds are good for en croute treatments, but typically, unlined, don't seal against leaking liquid.

Have you looked through The Terrine Topic ? There's good information in there about containers, too, and as a fan of French terrines, I think you'll find reading through it to be a trip in itself.

There's some truly stunning pieces of work in there, by various eG members. You could do worse than forgo a mould entirely and do as Baron d'Apcher does (see the latest page, page 10, various posts). Will we see your own terrines in there, mr drinkie ? I need to jump in there myself at some point.

Edited by Blether (log)

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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Wow. Thanks, blether, for the terrine thread link. I got through 3-4 pages and it was very good reading (and pictures). Right now I am just thinking about rabbit terrine with berries and gin. That just sounds way too good. I just made a rabbit dish a few weeks ago and it was fabulous, and I had strangely never thought about it for a terrine.

Here in Minnesota rabbit is very expensive, but when I lived in DC it was one of the cheapest meats at the market. Maybe the market will determine the contents of my terrine.

And yes, I will show the photos of my terrines when they pop out of the oven.

k.

Edited by mr drinkie (log)

I like to say things and eat stuff.

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In most commercial kitchens anything is used for terrines, Pate en croute molds (the collapsible ones) do work well if they are lined with cling film. I can attest to this as I have done it many times.

That being said I have worked with the enamel-clad cast iron ones, and they are a luxury to work with, no need for cling film liners, no leaky seams, and they hold up very well to years of use and abuse. Most "presses" are invariably a piece of wood wrapped in foil or cling and weighted down with a couple of un-opened tin cans. My favorite and best "press" was a hunk of nylon cutting board that I recut to a size to fit terrine molds--dish washer safe and robust to boot!

But-tum... correct me if I'm wrong about the terminology. A "terrine" is a meat item baked/poached in an earthen-ware form, No? Hence the word "Terrine" related to Terre, or earth? A "pate" is a meat paste, and a "pate en croute" is a meat paste baked in a crust, hence the need for a metal form?

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  • 6 months later...

Well, I am resurrecting this thread as I have (finally) purchased my molds. A trip to France resolved that. I got two of the silicone Mostrad ones (500g) with cover and the press. I thought breaking them up into two small molds would be nice instead of one big one and this way the terrine press works with the size.

I also got a tin collapsable one. I don't know the size off hand (maybe 750g). I also saw the Emile Henry Colors mold there made out of some Ceradon material. It was much cheaper than the cast iron one and I thought about getting it, but it would have been difficult to get back in my bags. Has anyone tried this material out? These items are much cheaper than the cast iron.

Anyhow, I want to start making terrines soon and I was wondering about thermometers. The Mostrad molds have a hole in the lid to insert a thermometer. I've been reading threads on those remote thermometers but it seems as if most of them get mixed reviews. I do have a thermapen. Is that the best option or is there a good remote thermometers out there?

Thanks.

I like to say things and eat stuff.

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