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Ramadan


stellabella
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At least four of my students are fasting for Ramadan. Yesterday I commented on their listless, inattentive, glazed stares. Of course, I am totally supportive of their commitment to the religious observation, but I'm worried about their academic participation. They told me that technically they're supposed to rise every morning at 5:30 and have a good breakfast together before dawn, and then eat again after sundown. Of course, they're 18 so they don't rise for their morning meal.

Observing Ramadan in Oxford, Gerogia, must be quite tough.

I know very little about it and wonder, Is anyone else fasting for Ramadan? If so, how do you deal with the fatigue? Do you get used to it? Tips?

This is the worst time of year to be fasting--the weather is changing, our bodies crave warmth and sleep, and above all, food.

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A while back I was in Pakistan during Ramadan. Out my hotel window, I saw dozens of construction workers laboring all day in 97 degree heat with no food or water. I don't know how they did it. (Come to think of it, when I did my trek in Nepal, the Nepali porters drank very little water while walking. Even in the low-lands, which were very hot and humid, they rarely had more than a cup of water with lunch.)

Just hope they don't celebrate Eid in Georgia they way they do in Karachi.

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I have been eating Iftar meals at Diwan for the last week... Amazing Bengali dishes prepared Halal by the staff. I eat with them, and even take some meat to ensure that no Non-Moslem employee makes fun of them.

They work hard and wait till after 5 to eat. They cook their own food. Special Halal meat is ordered for their consumption.

And the food is delicious.

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when i visited egypt in '94 ramadan had just ended, so one of my hosts prepared a special eid dessert for me--called oom-allah--but that's phonetic, no idea how to spell it--she was sorry we had arrived too late to miss the wonderful eid dishes--apparently they eat crazy huge delicious meals every night.

maybe one gets used to the fasting. thanks for the feedback!

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I am not Moslem but look forward to eating my one meal most days with my Moslem friends for the very reason your friend shared with you. Amazing feasts are prepared and enjoyed communally. Often all enjoyed from communal platters or bowls. Eaten by hand. The variety of dishes is rich, the love and time given in preparation of these dishes sincere and substantial. The meal period becomes a time for people to think of elders, old days.. blessings, wishes, prayer, harmony, peace and a future of joy... And I have seen this over the years and in ample doses....Egypt must have been great.. how I wish I could be in Egypt during Ramadan someday....

Stellabella, would you mind sharing more about that dessert your friend made for the Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan? In India that particular Eid is called Meethi Eid (sweet Eid). And desserts, especially a sheer khurma (vermicelli pudding) is traditional and sensational.

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  • 2 years later...

I'm posting recipes for Ramadan on my blog from now untill the end of the holy month.

Please enjoy I invite muslims from other countries to suggest dishes and I will present a similar or possibly even same Algerian dish.

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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I know very little about it and wonder, Is anyone else fasting for Ramadan?  If so, how do you deal with the fatigue?  Do you get used to it?  Tips?

This is the worst time of year to be fasting--the weather is changing, our bodies crave warmth and sleep, and above all, food.

In the Middle East, school and work lets out early. Usually people go home and nap for a few hours until sunset. Then after sunset, businesses reopen and everyone is outside. You need to wake up right before sunrise (at that time it was around 3am) and eat a light meal -- in most arab countries there would be a bunch of guys who would walk through town in the early hours, singing and beating a large drum. They make the rounds to all the houses in town throughout the month and you are supposed to give them some money. It is a nice tradition -- passed down from father to son. The year I left the old guy was training his son to do it, kid had a beautiful voice.

This isn's such a bad time to be fasting -- worse is during the summer when it's hot and sunset is at 8pm or later. Admittedly the nicest time to fast was when it was in January. :rolleyes:

Stress upon your students the need to get to bed a little earlier and wake up for the "suhur" meal. It's tough outside of a supportive environment though. I've stopped doing it in recent years because it was seriously affecting my ability to work. I get very dizzy, and I can't go off for a nap here. :hmmm:

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when i visited egypt in '94 ramadan had just ended, so one of my hosts prepared a special eid dessert for me--called oom-allah--but that's phonetic, no idea how to spell it--she was sorry we had arrived too late to miss the wonderful eid dishes--apparently they eat crazy huge delicious meals every night.

maybe one gets used to the fasting.  thanks for the feedback!

Yes somewhat true. We are also supposed to share what we have, that's supposed to be the Muslim way all the time. Anyone who has traveled/lived in a Muslim country will tell you about the hospitality.

The idea for the "feasts" to break the fast is that the dishes be nutritious and invigorating, lots of special ingredients. Some people actually gain weight during Ramadan! But really it's supposed to be a time of self-evaluation, cleansing and sharing. So you make grand dishes and platters piled with sweets. You are supposed to share them with everyone.

Another reason to fast to remind yourself of hunger, to remind yourself how even "basic" things like water and bread can be scarce.

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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A while back I was in Pakistan during Ramadan.  Out my hotel window, I saw dozens of construction workers laboring all day in 97 degree heat with no food or water...

Is that really the case? Water not allowed during Ramadan?

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A while back I was in Pakistan during Ramadan.  Out my hotel window, I saw dozens of construction workers laboring all day in 97 degree heat with no food or water...

Is that really the case? Water not allowed during Ramadan?

Water is not allowed while you're fasting.

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Is that really the case? Water not allowed during Ramadan?

Water is not allowed while you're fasting.

Well, I was specifically wondering about Ramadan. The term "fast" can imply quite a few different types of restrictions -- religious or otherwise. At any rate, I looked it up, and yeah it seems water is not allowed... I was aware dispensation is given for both food and drink, for the sick and infirm. I was just thinking, if you're doing hard physical labor, outdoor, in the sun, and no water -- that's gotta be tough.

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I'm posting recipes for Ramadan on my blog from now untill the end of the holy month.

Please enjoy I invite muslims from other countries to suggest dishes and I will present a similar or possibly even same Algerian dish.

Thanks Chefzadi. I look forward to reading your blog although I try to eat light during Ramadhan. I think that people get too caught up in eating (especially high fat foods) at this time. The lemons which I prepared (using your recipe) are ready now and I hope to try the Djedj bel Zitoun soon.

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Is that really the case? Water not allowed during Ramadan?

Water is not allowed while you're fasting.

Well, I was specifically wondering about Ramadan. The term "fast" can imply quite a few different types of restrictions -- religious or otherwise. At any rate, I looked it up, and yeah it seems water is not allowed... I was aware dispensation is given for both food and drink, for the sick and infirm. I was just thinking, if you're doing hard physical labor, outdoor, in the sun, and no water -- that's gotta be tough.

Imagine doing it in the hot Australian summer. I've known two Muslims and they both suffered terribly during the heat of Ramadan.

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I remember when I was in Junior High School (in the early 80's) and there was a Turkish girl in my class who passed out. Turns out she was observing Ramadan, which happened to be in the Spring that year. She was fasting and got dizzy and weak. At that time, I didn't know much about Muslims and Ramadan, but looking back I suspect that she was not rising before sunrise to eat the morning meal.

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I know very little about this religion, but if you're "supposed" to get up early and eat before daybreak, and then you're "supposed" to fast...

I guess I'm questioning whether all of these aspects are mandated. If so, I would have very little sympathy for anyone who chose to follow part of the mandate, but not all of it. Getting up early and making sure that your body is properly nourished makes sense, and takes discipline, just as fasting does.

Maybe you can suggest to your students that they prepare at least a small meal for themselves the night before, get up and eat it before sunrise, and perhaps nap again before class.

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I ask kindly and gently that this thread does not turn into anecdotal accounts of "I once knew a Muslim who passed out..." :biggrin:

It's a very special month for us and for the most part the Muslims I know look forward to it very much. The meals after the fast is broken are very special times with family and friends. In India even non-Muslims look forward to all the wonderful food eaten during Ramadan. And one must share this food especially with the poor.

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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A non-muslim, but, I, for one, have been waiting for Ramadan. "Selamat menunaikan ibadah puasa" (Have a fulfilling ramadan) to all muslims. In my neighborhood, there are many stalls selling buka puasa (breaking fast) spread. Unfortunately, it's also raining a bit these days. Guess who you'll see totting an umbrella with a toddler salivating at all the goodies.......and having a break from cooking dinner?

Edited by Tepee (log)

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Bumping up the thread. I've posted many more Ramadan recipes in my blogs and the Bob Beer has submitted an article about Ramadan in Instanbul.

An estimated 1.7 billion muslims in the world. Not alot of Ramadan or halal threads in this global forum though.

I know, I know I can start them. And I will. :smile:

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Chefzadi: is Id tonight or tomorrow night? (should be tonight

as last night was the new moon)?

Anyway: Id Mubarak!

What are you planning to feast on?

Belated happy Diwali to all, and some yummy feast descriptions

are over on the India thread.....

Milagai

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