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hemisphere/molded mousses


QbanCrackr
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so i came across some really nice looking desserts online from a bakery and was wondering how they got them to look so pretty...i'm good with making mousses and stuff but not so much with the presentation...usually thats just a dollop in a bowl or something =/

in any case, here are some links to pictures with my ideas on how i'd get them like that.....maybe some of y'all can contribute with the proper way? :)

#1 appears to be a raspberry + chocolate mousse in an oval shape with a raspberry gelee on top?

piping layers into a stainless mold then topping with the gelee and freezing to set?

#2 by color maybe a mango mousse topped with a kiwi and blueberry...

same as above?

#3 chocolate mousse domes

silicon mold, freeze to set, turn out and cover with pate a glacer? (spelling on that one?

#4 triple chocolate mousse

same as #2?

i'd really love to be able to do these for friends and family, any help would be amaaaazing :)

-d

Danny

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Hello QbanCrackr,

You found some pretty patisserie there!

For my money:

1. As you say. Probably individual moulds. The first mousse layer is piped in. Then chilled (we would use a blast chiller) - this ensures a clean line between the layers. Then the second layer is added. Chilled again. Then the glaze is added and the product is not normally frozen again (although it may be). This kind of glaze is most often bought in by patisseries (then coloured for use) but can be made. Here is an example recipe: http://lapatisseriedebarzaz.over-blog.com/article-11371539.html. I am happy to translate this if you would like.

This kind of patisserie can be made in a large frame and then the pieces stamped/cut out (this is why they are often square edged - it causes less wastage and means you can use a knife!) Here though you can see the chocolate mousse is at different heights which implies they were done individually. Probably line the moulds with acetate ribbon.

NB There is most probably some kind of biscuit (i.e. thin sponge) at the bottom of these even though it is not visible.

2. These are similar to the previous ones but look like mini individual charlottes. That is to say, the funky coloured bottom halves are in fact a thin genoise (or similar biscuit), coloured with one of a variety of techniques (eg colour applied directly to silpat before the batter is spread onto it and baked) and then cut and placed into the mould. A large sheet of genoise will be baked and the individual pieces cut out. As above, there is probably also a disc of genoise at the bottom. There also may well be some kind of gelee/fruit insert in the middle of the mousse.

The coloured portion may not be genoise. It may, for instance, be coloured chocolate (done onto acetate and then used to line the moulds).

The glaze is as above.

3. Yes, you seem to be spot on here. Blast chiller to set, popped out and then glazed. This kind of mirror glaze kind be purchased ready made. I would be happy to share a recipe I have for a home made glaze which is the one I have used on my iced bomb on this page: (half way down)

The glazing is done by placing the items on a wire grill over a baking tray and ladling/pouring the glaze over at the correct temperature.

4. Same as 1.

Hope this is clear and, of course, people may have other ideas!

Richard

===================================================

I kept a blog during my pâtisserie training in France: Candid Cake

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hi,

doing this kind of mousse cake (in france they are called petit gateau) is our main business, we produce about 2000 per week. luckily its not as complicated as richard wrote. you certainly need moulds, which you can get from demarle. first you prepare your mousse, if you got a lot of pieces to do at once you´ll want to keep your mousse slightly more fluid to keep it from setting on you while filling. next you fill some mousse into the molds, and add your core, which is usually a jellied coulis, a brulee, a bavaroise, or simply a compote forzen in small cylinders. you add the core by pressing it into your mousse, now you add more mousse and finish with a piece of biscuit, dacquoise, brownie or whatever you like, scrape it clean and put it in the freezer for 24h. its true that you gain a bit of quality if you use a blast chiller (we have one) but you can do fine without. here is a nice recipe for a nappage neutre, once cooked you can store it in the fridge and flavour it with any fruit puree (20%). you glaze by pulling your petit gateau from the freezer, put them on a grate and laddle the 50C nappage on. the nappage will set pretty much instantly, now you pull em from the grate with an offset spatula and put em back in the freezer until you need them....

gateaux.jpg

1.jpg

2.jpg

3.jpg

Edited by schneich (log)

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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the nappage will set pretty much instantly, now you pull em from the grate with an offset spatula and put em back in the freezer until you need them....

would i keep these in the freezer all the time? or could i keep them refrigerated so theyre not so hard right out of the freezer?

Danny

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wow such helpful responses! tmrw is my sister birthday, if i had some molds i'd love to be able to get this done for then but alas i've got no hemispheres :(

Hello QbanCrackr,

You found some pretty patisserie there!

For my money:

1. As you say. Probably individual moulds. The first mousse layer is piped in. Then chilled (we would use a blast chiller) - this ensures a clean line between the layers. Then the second layer is added. Chilled again. Then the glaze is added and the product is not normally frozen again (although it may be). This kind of glaze is most often bought in by patisseries (then coloured for use) but can be made. Here is an example recipe: http://lapatisseriedebarzaz.over-blog.com/article-11371539.html. I am happy to translate this if you would like.

I tried a google page translation (usually i've found this translator to be real good, but it gave me an error :hmmm:) Would you be so kind as to give me a basic translation on it?

I would be happy to share a recipe I have for a home made glaze which is the one I have used on my iced bomb on this page

Could you also help me with this one? I noticed you wrote it wasn't designed for frozen items--you mean those pieces that are to be served at frozen temperature right?

you glaze by pulling your petit gateau from the freezer, put them on a grate and laddle the 50C nappage on.

50C/122F would be the proper temperature to glaze with?

Danny

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Here is the nappage neutre recipe which I tried to link to (and Schneich managed to):

The recipe is from a book published by l'Ecole Lenotre. The nappage gives a professional, shiny finish which prevents fruit from oxydising and will also prevent mousse-based entremets from drying out.

Ingredients:

500g water

20g NH pectin

125g sugar

400g sugar

33g glucose

Method:

1. Heat the water to 50°C in a saucepan.

2. Mix the pectin with the sugar in a bowl until well combined then, while whisking, add to the warmed water.

3. Add the rest of the sugar and the glucose and bring to the boil.

4. Sieve into a bowl and cover with film, ensuring the film is touching the surface of the glacage.

5. Let the nappage cool then keep at 4°C

Further thoughts:

The reason for the funny business with the pectin and the sugar is to prevent the pectin clumping when it is added to the water.

As Schneich says, you can heat this kind of nappage up for glazing. I haven't tried this specific recipe but with commercially available nappage neutre you can also just work it until it is supple and spread it with a palette knife (eg onto the surface of a framed entremets). If you spread a layer then add a few drops of food colouring and work with a palette knife you can create some interesting (if dated) marble effects.

Re freezing, Schneich may have been talking about a specific dessert but in general mousses, glazed or not, do not need freezing, especially if you are just making a small quantity at home for immediate consumption. It's a conservation thing.

Re recipe for mirror glaze. Certainly, I will post it here when I next go home and can lay my hands on it. As it happens, it worked fine on my frozen bomb (which I served immediately) but I have not tried freezing and then thawing this glaze. It might lose a bit of shine but you ought to be able to revive it with gentle encouragement from a blow-torch.

===================================================

I kept a blog during my pâtisserie training in France: Candid Cake

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Ingredients:

500g water

20g NH pectin

125g sugar

400g sugar

33g glucose

Method:

1. Heat the water to 50°C in a saucepan.

2. Mix the pectin with the sugar in a bowl until well combined then, while whisking, add to the warmed water.

3. Add the rest of the sugar and the glucose and bring to the boil.

4. Sieve into a bowl and cover with film, ensuring the film is touching the surface of the glacage.

5. Let the nappage cool then keep at 4°C

thanks alot!

just out of curiosity, step 2 involves mixing the 125g of sugar with the pectin and then in step 3 you add the remaining 400g?

Danny

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hi,

doing this kind of mousse cake (in france they are called petit gateau) is our main business, we produce about 2000 per week. luckily its not as complicated as richard wrote. you certainly need moulds, which you can get from demarle. first you prepare your mousse, if you got a lot of pieces to do at once you´ll want to keep your mousse slightly more fluid to keep it from setting on you while filling. next you fill some mousse into the molds, and add your core, which is usually a jellied coulis, a brulee, a bavaroise, or simply a compote forzen in small cylinders. you add the core by pressing it into your mousse, now you add more mousse and finish with a piece of biscuit, dacquoise, brownie or whatever you like, scrape it clean and put it in the freezer for 24h. its true that you gain a bit of quality if you use a blast chiller (we have one) but you can do fine without. here is a nice recipe for a nappage neutre, once cooked you can store it in the fridge and flavour it with any fruit puree (20%). you glaze by pulling your petit gateau from the freezer, put them on a grate and laddle the 50C nappage on. the nappage will set pretty much instantly, now you pull em from the grate with an offset spatula and put em back in the freezer until you need them....

gateaux.jpg

1.jpg

2.jpg

3.jpg

Wow! These look amazing! The passion fruit one is my favourite, too bad I can't understand a word in your website :rolleyes:

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Wow! These look amazing! The passion fruit one is my favourite, too bad I can't understand a word in your website :rolleyes:

If you have Google Toolbar switched on, you can have the Translate function which automatically translates text of webpages into your native language. It's usually close enough to figure out what's going on.

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i'm going to be hitting up the kitchen tmrw, i read on another thread here that to stabilize mousses for molding that 1% of the total weight should be gelatin?

i.e. a sheet of gold (assuming with 2g of gelatin in it) would be enough to stabilize 100g of fruit base + 100g of whipped cream (1% gelatin for chocolate mousses?)

my chocolate mousse recipe calls for 12oz of chocolate, 1-3/4c heavy cream & 1 teaspoon of gelatin...i'm not sure on how much the cream weighs so i can't accurately say if thats a 1% ratio but it does come out very creamy and holds up great as a filling between cake layers

Danny

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