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Gail CDM

Sides for Beef Wellington

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I need your help. I have to cook Beef Wellington for 50 people...plated, and I don't know what sides I should go with. Maybe some kind of potato...but WHAT. Help please

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Make it easy on yourself.

Do Pommes Dauphinoise (or any potato dish that can be cooked as a whole and portioned up for serving), steamed french beans and vichy carrots.


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No good on the potatoes...don't have a deep fryer. Good thinking though. Maybe something along that line though. Maybe Duchesse Potatoes. I think the nutmeg in the pots would accent the heaviness of the meat. Since I need to complement the meal with red wine, and cannot serve it, is there a nice red wine reduction that can go along with the bean/carrot combo. Cranberry something comes to mind..what do you think?

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Erm, you might want to have a wee Google to find out what Pommes Dauphinoise actually are...

Personally I'd avoid fruit in the sauce of this dish, as the carrots would give enough balancing sweetness to the plate (though I have a very English/French palate).


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Some confusion there, maybe, between pommes de t dauphine (seasoned mash mixed with egg & fried as croquettes - very a la minute) and gratin dauphinois (sliced, baked in cream).

Personally I think the pastry gives a good opportunity to get away from potato hegemony, and I like something green with Beef Wellington. In this season, endive ? Leek ? Cabbage ? Elizabeth David gives a French recipe for leeks in red wine, if you're intent on the wine. Port or Madeira also make a complementary sauce.

Beef Wellington's a lot of work. There's good reason to keep the sides simple - I love sprouts so find it easy to agree with that idea. They're not everyone's cup of tea.

What other courses will you serve ? Are you holding off the decision till you've finalised the main plate ?

ETA: I also like leeks cooked to remain a little crunchy, and dressed like a hot salad, Italian style, with oil & vinegar. Something to cut the richness.


Edited by Blether (log)

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Greens. Easy and can sit as long as you like. Root vege gratin for a variety of flavors and again can sit and are pretty indestructable.

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Starting with amuse bouche of Leek and wild rice turnovers. still working on sauce- thinking of either sesame / peanut seasoned with allspice / cinnamon or clove.

Then mushroom soup (morels and procini)with a splash of white wine to smooth it out.

Salad consisting of bacon, shallots,spring greens, with a wonderful rosemary / thyme peanut balsamic something.

Veggies need to be light, fresh, green,and blending with the meal.

With such a heavy meal...dessert is still up in the air. Need to have something to cut the richness of the meat. Citrus - Lemon Pie, maybe. Suggestions??

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Well you're serving Beef Wellington... so dessert has to be crystallised oranges spiked with Grand Marnier, and brandysnaps. So good, so 70's...

eta: crystallised by which I mean caramelised.


Edited by Blether (log)

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What did you finally decide on the sides for the Wellington?

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Roasted parsnips are another thought. Then there's a winter green gradation - a few florets of broccoli dressed with the smallest amount of oil and some lemon juice, a couple of slices of braised fennel, and at the white end, parsnip ? Leeks will either fit as a link to the turnover, or be too much in the same meal.

Once you have some crunchy vegetable, you could even puree the parsnip - serve the meat on a little parsnip puree, drizzle with red wine / stock reduction - or bring the wine reduction and parsnip puree together ? Parsnip gives a nice sweetness as a third element with the rich meat & a sour-dressed veg - and it's always such a great flavour with beef.


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Sprouts are just too questionable...not everyone likes them. I like the idea of broccoli, lemon and oil. That will keep it light. The potatoes are still in question too.. what about a nice mushroom risetto? Morels are just too expensive this time of year. Any suggestions for a better selection of mushroom?

Dessert is steering towards Creme Brulee, with a whisper of lemon.

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If you're serving mushroom soup, mushroom risotto might not be the best choice for a side dish. Also, creme brulee doesn't seem particularly light, if you're still thinking of something light for dessert.

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Probably because we are Italian we always serve petit pois and artichoke hearts.  We slice an onion very thinly and saute' it in olive oil until soft, then add a clove or two of sliced or smashed garlic, cook for a minute or two.  Then we add cans of petit pois and artichoke hearts to the pan.  Cook only until warm and serve.  It's light, green and goes well with the Wellington.  Frozen or canned artichokes and peas work just as well.

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