Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Ferran Adria announces El Bulli closure


gavinhanly
 Share

Recommended Posts

Indeed!, I have just came back from the press conference where he has announced the closing for 2012 and 2013 and will be back in 2014. The format is jet to be developed but El Bulli will probably be opened the whole year from 2014 onwards, at least until 2020.

Only time will tell how will it be after these two years dedicated to creativity and reflexion.

Rogelio Enríquez aka "Rogelio"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe it's because my three year old is completely obsessed with "Charlie and the Chcocolate Factory" movie these days, but this immediately brought to mind Willy Wonka and his closure of the chocolate factory for a period of time. Let's hope Adria does not return with Oompa Loompas :smile:.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let's hope Adria does not return with Oompa Loompas :smile:.

I don't know... might be kinda cool if he did. :raz:

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Must be nice not to have to worry about making a living. Unheard of really, to close a money maker like this.

Actors do it all the time, stopping a role when their show is on top but usually not in any other type of business.

I wonder what type of innovations for the making of food products he can or hopes to accomplish ?

What happens to all the people he employes in the the two years ?

Edited by Aloha Steve (log)

edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Must be nice not to have to worry about making a living. Unheard of really, to close a money maker like this.

Actors do it all the time, stopping a role when their show is on top but usually not in any other type of business.

I wonder what type of innovations for the making of food products he can or hopes to accomplish ?

What happens to all the people he employes in the the two years ?

My reaction exactly. Surely there's more to the story.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a couple of fairly lengthy discussions with Albert Adria, and, he said that the restaurant itself doesn't really make money. They survive off the sale of books.

IMO, if he needs a break, he needs a break. After spending years living in a van trying to keep the place alive, and then a lot of intense years working hard running it, he deserves a sort of retirement. The toughest part of shorter vacations is knowing that you have to return to work soon. With a longer span of time ahead of him, perhaps he can fully relax and enjoy life a little.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Must be nice not to have to worry about making a living.

My thoughts too...but then I read the other posts. Interesting. El Bulli sounds more like a college lab than a restaurant. BTW, they are opening a new college near San Sebastian dedicated to these food techniques.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd say this is just shrewed marketing, nothing more. Now he is in more demand and when he opens his sycophants will fall all over each other to get into his restaurant. While still popular, he had become a adjective for the gastro thing, his name and flame not so shocking anymore. I'm sure he'll come up with something interesting, at this point if he were to open a sub shop everyone would still flip out because of his brand. He's working is adoring public.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I doubt that shrewd marketing has much to do with it. After all, el Bulli already receives more requests annually than they could fill in something like 50 years. While there will certainly be a great deal of anticipation as the re-opening approaches, if marketing were the whole story, why not simply keep the restaurant open all year long starting this year? There is certainly enough demand. I am sure there is a story here, but don't know what it is.

While I have never eaten at El Bulli, never applied for seating, and don't do any form of molecular gastronomy at home, I have considerable admiration for the creativity of Feran Adria and his team.

Edited by Richard Kilgore
tone (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

From what I understand, it has nothing to do with marketing but clearly the fact that it has been harder and harder to come up with new concepts each and every year and he has decided that in order to continue to be innovative, they needed some time to reflect on what they have done and use that as a springboard for new creative ideas. Hence the 2-year hiatus. The restaurant has never made money and making money from El Bulli has never been a motivation for Ferran. His consulting for various food related companies along with his product sales keeps El Bulli running.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I may come under attack for this, but who the heck cares about E Bulli? I would be much more concerned if I learned that Harold McGee would cease researching and writing about food, or if Alton Brown retired from TV. For the first, he contributes to knowledge which I can relate to and benefit from in my home kitchen, and for the second, he is entertaining. Neither is a characteristic of Adria, who makes stuff which requires investments in equipment and materials far beyond 99% of the human population, and who costs to experience his personal achievements much more than almost any of us can pay for. The less I hear about ridiculous food manipulations, the better.

Ray

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hard for me to understand a post that both expresses concern if McGee disappeared but heaps derision on the "ridiculous food manipulations" of Adria, the practitioner often credited with finding ways to bring many of McGee's concepts into reality and sharing those methods freely.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

In a move that I don't find to be much of a surprise, Chef Adria has announced that the closure of El Bulli will in fact be permanent.

He has decided to open an academy, as a better way to spend the half-million Euro per year that El Bulli supposedly costs to operate.

Edited by KD1191 (log)

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In a move that I don't find too be much of a surprise, Chef Adria has announced that the closure of El Bulli will in fact be permanent.

He has decided to open an academy, as a better way to spend the half-million Euro per year that El Bulli supposedly costs to operate.

Should have tried to go. Oh well.

I think the article says they have been losing a half million Euros per year, not that it's the operating cost.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In a move that I don't find too be much of a surprise, Chef Adria has announced that the closure of El Bulli will in fact be permanent.

He has decided to open an academy, as a better way to spend the half-million Euro per year that El Bulli supposedly costs to operate.

Should have tried to go. Oh well.

I think the article says they have been losing a half million Euros per year, not that it's the operating cost.

Yes, he says the restaurant operates at a net loss. Sorry if my choice of words wasn't clear.

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In a move that I don't find too be much of a surprise, Chef Adria has announced that the closure of El Bulli will in fact be permanent.

He has decided to open an academy, as a better way to spend the half-million Euro per year that El Bulli supposedly costs to operate.

Should have tried to go. Oh well.

I think the article says they have been losing a half million Euros per year, not that it's the operating cost.

Yes, he says the restaurant operates at a net loss. Sorry if my choice of words wasn't clear.

Perhaps if the restaurant stayed open like a regular business does, all year long, maybe it would not loose money.

The rent, insurance other operating expenses go on all 12 months, I would imagine.

edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oopsie.

Spanish celebrity chef Ferran Adrià has denied weekend reports that he is to permanently close his three-Michelin-starred restaurant El Bulli. ...

[A]n article in the New York Times over the weekend quoted the famous chef saying that he would close El Bulli for good replacing it with an academy for advanced culinary studies. ... However, Adrià has now denied the report in a Spanish newspaper saying the New York Times had misquoted him.

Phew and -- huh? "[m]isquoted"?

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I may come under attack for this, but who the heck cares about E Bulli? I would be much more concerned if I learned that Harold McGee would cease researching and writing about food, or if Alton Brown retired from TV. For the first, he contributes to knowledge which I can relate to and benefit from in my home kitchen, and for the second, he is entertaining. Neither is a characteristic of Adria, who makes stuff which requires investments in equipment and materials far beyond 99% of the human population, and who costs to experience his personal achievements much more than almost any of us can pay for. The less I hear about ridiculous food manipulations, the better.

Ray

I share the general sentiment, and Frank Bruni of the New York Times had these comments that I also think are pertinent:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/27/dining/27adria.html?ref=dining

El Bulli hasn't been accessible to most of us, so it's hard for me to get too regretful about it.

However, I do recognize that Adria's at the forefront of some interesting techniques with food, some of which will sooner or later trickle down to a more accessible level. For me, it's a situation analogous to the money spent on space exploration, in that it's actually pushed the development of several new technologies that have found their way into my life, probably to a greater extent than I realize.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Anonymous Modernist 16589
      I'm looking to buy some new pots and pans and would like to tap into your knowledege and experiance with them. Which pans tend to yield the best and most consistant results. Same for pots. Any and all recommendations would be greatly appriciated, thank you in advance.
      Herman 8D
    • By Doodad
      Has anybody tried making a dark roux in a pressure cooker? Can this be done without scortching do you think? I have made roux in the oven before and started wondering about this topic.
    • By kostbill
      I really want to improve the flavor of my chicken breast so I want to try to inject brine with fat and flavors.
       
      I would like to try brining with some hydrocolloids. The one example I found is this: https://torontofoodlab.com/2013/08/20/meat-tenderizing-with-a-carrageenan-brine/.
       
      However I cannot apply that to my chicken breast because I am cooking it sous vide, so the chicken will not reach the temperature needed for the carrageenan to gel.
       
      I am thinking of using Methyl cellulose, first disperse in hot water, then leave it for 24 hours in the fridge, then add salt, fat and flavors and inject it.
      I am afraid that until it reaches the 50C or 60C that the Methyl cellulose needs in order to gel, the liquid will escape.
      Any ideas?
      Thanks.
    • By Anonymous Modernist 760
      Thanks for putting up this forum 🙂
      I would like to bake using a combination of sous vide and a conventional oven. Would it be possible to put the dough in a vacuum bag cook it sous vide at 37C for the dough to raise optimal and then put it in a conventional oven?
      Thanks
    • By PedroG
      Utilization of meat leftovers from sous-vide cooking
      Sometimes when you buy a nice cut of meat, your eyes are bigger than your and your beloved's stomach. So what to do with the leftovers?
      In Tyrolia (Austria) they make a "Gröstl", in Solothurn (Switzerland) they make a "Gnusch", in the Seftigenamt (a region in the Swiss canton Berne) they make a "Gmüder", and we (Pedro and SWAMBO) make a varying concoct using ideas from all of the three. We call it "Gröstl", but it is not necessarily a typical Tyrolean Gröstl, and it is different each time, and we usually do not top it with a fried egg as they do in Austria.
      Ingredients

      All your meat leftovers
      Onion (compulsory)
      Any hard vegetable (we prefer celery stalks, or zucchini)
      Any salad (iceberg lettuce or endive/chicory or any other salad leaves, may contain carrot julienne)
      Fried potatoes, or alternatively sweetcorn kernels
      Sherry or wine or bouillon or the gravy you preserved from your last LTLT.cooked meat for simmering (I usually prefer Sherry)
      Eventually some cream (or crème fraîche)
      Salt, pepper, parsley, caraway seeds (typical for Tyrolean Gröstl), paprika, condiment (in Switzerland we use "Aromat" by Knorr, which contains sodium chloride, sodium glutamate, lactose, starch, yeast extract, vegetable fats, onions, spices, E552)'
      vegetable oil (I prefer olive oil)




      Mise en place

      cut your meat in small cubes or slices
      cut the onion(s) not too fine (place the first cut below your tongue to avoid tearing during cutting)
      cut the vegetables about 3-4 mm thick
      cut the salads to pieces smaller than 4 cm, distribute on the cutting board and season deliberately
      cut the potatoes to 1 cm cubes
      place 3 heavy skillets with ample oil on the stove

      Cooking

      in skillet 1, stir-fry the onions, add the hard vegetables still stir-frying, add salad, add sufficient liquid (Sherry or wine or bouillon or gravy) for simmering under a cover until soft. If desired, reduce heat and add some cream at the end.
      in skillet 2, stir-fry the potatoes until soft (in case of sweetcorn kernels, add to skillet 1 after stir-frying and use skillet 2 for skillet 3)
      in skillet 3, as soon as the vegetables and the potatoes are soft, sear the meat in just smoking oil for 30-60 seconds, then add to skillet 1

      Serving
      You may mix the potatoes with the vegetables and meat to make a rather typical Gröstl, or serve the fried potatoes separately; we prefer the latter, as the potatoes stay more crunchy.
      Do not forget to serve a glass of good dry red wine!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...