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Dianabanana

Where can I buy *French* Maille dijon?

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The Maille produced in France is reportedly a far superior product to the one produced in Canada, and I'm having a hard time finding it. Kalustyan's lists Maille Dijon Originale "product of France," but upon arrival it turned out to be the same Canadian product that I can buy in my grocery.

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Try doing a "Google" on the product you want and then call the company to be sure it's the one you want. Have you tried the Mustard Museum? They have a huge selection from all over the world.


'A person's integrity is never more tested than when he has power over a voiceless creature.' A C Grayling.

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I've Googled extensively and Kalustyan's was the only place that even claimed to have the French product. I was hoping somebody here might know of a place that carries it.

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Try www.mustardmuseum.com


'A person's integrity is never more tested than when he has power over a voiceless creature.' A C Grayling.

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What's the difference between the French and the Canadian versions?

Shel


 ... Shel


 

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I noticed the same problem when the flavor of my old reliable Maille dijon changed and I saw that while it is imported - it's now imported from Canada. It's just like when they started making the large aluminum can of Sapporo beer in Canada - it became a completely different beer. Anyway, near as I can tell, you just can't get the French made mustard in North America.

Since then I've switched to a different mustard, made in France, that I can get at my local regular supermarket (a SuperFresh)! And I even like it better than the Maille. I buy both the regular and the old-fashioned (with seeds) versions. Apparently they have lately changed the label format but they say the mustard is the same. I haven't tried it yet in a bottle with the new label. I'm sure hoping that they didn't change anything else. Here it is:

http://www.mustardmuseum.com/product/2640/french

Edit: The old name was "Temeraire", in case you find that.


Edited by Carole (log)

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This is a tough one. I was surprised to find out that Maille is owned by Unilever. My guess is that they decided to market a slightly different flavor profile for North Americans and don't want to confuse matters by allowing a different product with the same name to be sold in the US. My only thought would be to contact Unilever or get it shipped directly from Europe. There does seem to be a Maille mustard store in Paris, at least as of a few years ago.

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At the risk of attack, I would recommend my favorite, Bornier - still made in France and available in the states with a little searching. I always preferred it to Maille, though the vinegar balance is a bit different.

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Interestingly, I have read that the French Maille is made with Canadian mustard seeds, so the difference must lie in the formula or the other ingredients.

Thanks for all the suggestions!

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You might have missed this: Here's a link to a place that advertises "All French Mustards" This might be the one you are looking for:

http://www.lepicerie...on_Mustard.html

Their mustards are from France.


'A person's integrity is never more tested than when he has power over a voiceless creature.' A C Grayling.

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I was in Costco today (in Canada) and saw big honking jars of Maille - made in France. Then I hit one of the local grocery stores - Sobey's - which is based on the east coast - they also had the french version. The jar in my fridge is Canadian, as were the jars in my usual supermarket.

So if you can't find it in your Costco, send me a PM and I'll put you together a care package.

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