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A lot of oyster mushrooms


OliverB
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Yesterday I found a huge cluster of oyster mushrooms growing on a tree in my yard. Scales in at 1 lb 9 oz, what would you do with them? I'm thinking some kind of meat with mushroom sauce, but more than one pound? Or just sautee them? Eat them with eggs?

Here they are, the large one on the left is 6 inches in diameterPicture 1.png:

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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Absolutely gorgeous! I love them sauteed with butter and garlic and served on crusty bread slices or tossed with pasta. If I am feeling really indulgent I make that a creamy alfredo type of sauce (cream, parmesan) with some spinach in the saute to balance out the decadence.

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Something I've tried recently, with a combination of oyster and other fresh mushrooms: Cut the mushrooms into manageable pieces, and put them in a Chinese sandpot or earthenware casserole with sliced garlic cloves, a drizzle of olive oil, maybe a little chopped fresh thyme if you have it. Cover with a round of parchment paper, then the lid of the pot, and cook over low heat for about 45 mins. Shake the pot occasionally so they don't stick. Season with S&P before service. The mushrooms cook in their own juices and come out with an intense flavor. If you have a heat diffuser, it's better to use it with the sandpot or earthenware for stovetop cooking. This is my adaptation of a recipe in Paula Wolfert's Mediterranean Clay Pot Cooking.

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I don't have a sand pot yet, but I'll keep that in mind! Sounds really good. That books also looks great, but expensive. Not by itself, but I'd have to buy all the clay pots.... :-D

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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Oyster mushrooms in January? Lucky you!

When we were lucky to have found large clusters of oyster mushrooms, I parboiled them first, and used them to make:

1. Clear soup (sumashi jiru in Japanese)

2. Gratin

3. Tempura

and some other dishes I don't remember.

If I remember correctly, I think I made foil-yaki first (wrap some mushrooms in aluminum foil, add some sake, close the foil, grill in the toater oven for 8-10 min., spinckle some soy sauce and citrus juice, and eat).

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Mmmmm--oysters are my favorite mushroom. Breaded and fried is great, but I also like them in Asian stir fry.

They dry well, too--just lay them out on paper towels or a rack until they lose most of their moisture. I keep mine in the freezer after I dry them.

Here in Missouri you can find them any month of the year, usually a week or so after heavy rains.

Be sure to keep an eye on that tree--often the mushrooms will appear again and again.

Edited by sparrowgrass (log)
sparrowgrass
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What a treat! I've neither the courage nor knowledge to forage for beauties like that, not yet anyways. Is that a beech tree?

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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it's an elm tree. I'm making about half of them now with some onions, garlic and some pork, all fried separate then all together with some chicken broth, boil down, add cream, smoked paprika, eat with brown rice mix. Seems to come along nicely :-)

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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They dry well, too--just lay them out on paper towels or a rack until they lose most of their moisture. I keep mine in the freezer after I dry them.

I second the drying option. Another method: separate onto a cooling rack, then place in an oven w/ just the pilot light on (or, the oven light, in the case of electric ovens).

Karen Dar Woon

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A few thoughts -

- Do not chop them, Oyster mushrooms simply need to be pulled or torn from the top down to the stem - much more natural and nicer IMO.

- Sear them and get some nice color on them which will help to bring out a ton of flavour.

- Add a bit of chopped garlic and whatever herbs you prefer at the end of cooking.

- Finish with butter and a tiny squeeze of lemon

on fresh crusty country bread

Mmmmm

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