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devlin

baking powder question

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I think this has come up somewhere around here at some point but I can't find where right now. So, I want to triple a cookie recipe (pizzelle) but am concerned that if I triple the baking powder the results will be less than desirable. Is there a rule of thumb someone can share? I've read somewhere that tripling the baking powder will result in a bitter flavor. Is that so? Should I reduce the baking powder?

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With yeasted doughs, some people cut back on the amount of yeast when multiplying recipes....I don't for a double batch.

I've not heard of a problem with baking powder. Too much baking soda will taste awful, though!

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first it really depends on the initial batch size. if it's really small then tripling should not be effected, however if by tripling you are getting into a decent batch size then i would probably go x2-2.5 instead of times three. i always use the rule of good judgment on stuff like baking soda and baking powder in large batches


nkaplan@delposto.com

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Make certain that the recipe has weight-based measurements.

Doubling or tripling volume-based recipes can lead to huge measurement errors. For example, you'll find equivalents printed all over the place for a cup of flour. One 'cup' of flour can weigh anywhere from 2.5 ounces to six ounces. If what a recipe needs is 4 ounces for a single batch, and the author writes that as '1 cup' then you triple it and really pack your flour in the cup, your triple amount of flour will wind up being 18 ounces instead of the 12 that the recipe author intended.

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Devlin, if this recipe is one that you have used before (with good results), I would not adjust the amounts for a triple batch.

If it's a new-to-you recipe, I would try a single batch first (noting how you measure, if you don't weigh them).

If you need a great pizzelle recipe, PM me!

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i've never made pizzelle, but i have made baked goods with an abundance of baking powder, and i would highly recommend finding non-aluminum powder. i find that when using a lot of baking powder, there can be a funny, well -- tinny -- taste. whole foods carries it and there are other brands as well. some folks in the south make their own, and i'm happy to post a homemade recipe (with baking soda and cream of tartar i believe...)

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Thanks folks. Given everything I've been reading, it sounds to me as if cutting back on the baking powder might be wise.

Weighing as opposed to measuring cups.... For sure. Understand, I've been baking artisan breads for several years now in my bakery, so yeah, I weigh everything.

Baroness, I'd like to take a look at your own recipe, so I'll pm you. Thanks!

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I don't quite understand why cutting back makes sense...

If you imagine making the triple batch as 3 separate single batches, then wouldn't you be using the same quantities as the recipe specifies? If you mixed 3 separate batches then combined them into one big bowl before baking, that's the same as mixing the 3 batches together, right?

For yeasted stuff, it makes sense that due to temperatures and multiplication of yeast, you may reduce the yeast a little, but as far as I know there's no such factor with baking powder.

The comment Lisa made about errors being multiplied when you are doubling (or more) makes sense, but again, isn't any different to the single batch, right? If your "cup" of flour is 6 ounces, the finished product will be too floury, and if you triple the batch, the finished product will be too floury to the same degree as the single batch (assuming that you are consistent in your measuring, even though it's incorrect to begin with).

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I don't quite understand why cutting back makes sense...

It doesn't make any real logical sense to me either, and in my head I ran through exactly the points you raise.

The reason I brought it up here is that I'd read somewhere before that both baking powder and baking soda can be problematic when doubling or tripling or otherwise multiplying a recipe, but also because I had already actually baked a batch of pizzelle after tripling the thing and things went badly. Not that you could tell from the dough itself, because it all looked just fine. But once finished, the pizzelle were off, and there was a decidedly bitter taste to them. I don't know what to make of that, all things being equal, but that was my experience, and I was reminded of reading about exactly that issue in the past.

Edited to note: I wonder whether making the baking powder and then using that in a multiplied batch might work. Any experiences here with that sort of thing?


Edited by devlin (log)

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Hmmm.

My family has routinely doubled the recipe I sent you with no problems. We use Calumet baking powder.

Could the unpleasant taste problem you had be due to another ingredient (old-ish flour, the butter, the eggs)?

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Hmmm.

My family has routinely doubled the recipe I sent you with no problems. We use Calumet baking powder.

Could the unpleasant taste problem you had be due to another ingredient (old-ish flour, the butter, the eggs)?

The flour was new, the butter fine, the eggs just bought. The dough smelled fine, but the cookies ended up with a sort of weird after taste of something that was nearly chemical and salty-like (I used only a dash of salt, as I always have). It's not a new recipe for me either, so I'm flummoxed.

That said, I haven't received any messages lately (just checked), so I haven't gotten the recipe yet. Did something go amiss?

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Check your messages; I re-sent the recipe. Something must have eaten yesterday's copy. :huh:

The reason I mentioned flour is that it is my most common villain; I don't use much all-purpose type and even though it *shouldn't* go bad (somewhat rancid/bitter), it seems to do so.

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... I want to triple a cookie recipe (pizzelle) but am concerned that if I triple the baking powder the results will be less than desirable. Is there a rule of thumb someone can share? I've read somewhere that tripling the baking powder will result in a bitter flavor. Is that so? Should I reduce the baking powder?

When you make a different SIZED cake, you need to tweak the baking time and temperature to allow the heat to get the different distance to the middle before the outside burns.

And if you mess with the time and temperature, you might very well need to mess with the raising agent. (Sadly I have no rules of thumb - but I'd welcome any!)

HOWEVER, devlin, you are making cookies.

Presumably, standard sized - just three times as many of the things.

Being same-sized, no messing with the baking time and temperature.

So, just keep the raising agent in the standard proportion.


"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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... I want to triple a cookie recipe (pizzelle) but am concerned that if I triple the baking powder the results will be less than desirable. Is there a rule of thumb someone can share? I've read somewhere that tripling the baking powder will result in a bitter flavor. Is that so? Should I reduce the baking powder?

When you make a different SIZED cake, you need to tweak the baking time and temperature to allow the heat to get the different distance to the middle before the outside burns.

And if you mess with the time and temperature, you might very well need to mess with the raising agent. (Sadly I have no rules of thumb - but I'd welcome any!)

HOWEVER, devlin, you are making cookies.

Presumably, standard sized - just three times as many of the things.

Being same-sized, no messing with the baking time and temperature.

So, just keep the raising agent in the standard proportion.

Well, yes, I understand I'm making cookies and not a cake, but the cautionary notes I've read here and there refer specifically to cookies in some instances, which I found confusing and for the reasons you mention.

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