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Starkman

Grease the pan and then...add parchment?

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Quick Question:

Is greasing the bottom of a pan before laying parchment over it done solely so that the parchment won't slide around?

Thanks,

Starkman

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Well, that's the only reason I do it, anyway. I can't imagine what other purpose it would serve... added protection against leaks sticking to the pan?


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Well, that's the only reason I do it, anyway. I can't imagine what other purpose it would serve...

What he said...


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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We were always taught in pastry and baking, by the inimitable Nick Malgieri, to butter the pan, put parchment in and then butter the parchment.

I was taught to do this in culinary school, with vegetable oil spray, especially with most cakes. I think there are two reasons:

1) If there's a failure of the spray and the item sticks, it's better for it to stick to the parchment, which can then be removed with care outside of the pan. If a cake or something similar sticks to the bottom of a pan, you cannot get to it easily while in the pan and you risk tearing it up. I think this is why we use parchment rounds but don't use parchment side-liners; you can easily slide a spat or knife around the inside sides of a pan.

2) The parchment creates a structural element that helps keep some baked goods in one piece, like roulade cake where you may have a thin cake the size of an entire sheet pan.

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We were always taught in pastry and baking, by the inimitable Nick Malgieri, to butter the pan, put parchment in and then butter the parchment.

I was taught by the more efficient David Lebovitz to butter the pan, put in the parchment, then flip over the parchment. Voila, the parchment is already greased. :wink:

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We were always taught in pastry and baking, by the inimitable Nick Malgieri, to butter the pan, put parchment in and then butter the parchment.

I was taught by the more efficient David Lebovitz to butter the pan, put in the parchment, then flip over the parchment. Voila, the parchment is already greased. :wink:

Hey, nice tip! :smile:


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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When baking sponge, I don't grease at all, Usually I bake in open cake rings, which are laid on a flat tray with a parchment underliner. After baking the cake is cut from the ring with a small spatula or knife.

I do notice a glazed or "fried" surface texture on the cakes if the form is buttered/ greased out. With Angelfood cakes I have been specifically "warned" NEVER to grease the pan or the batter fall and collapse.

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I simply either spray a small spot in the center or smear a dab of butter in the same spot before I put the parchment in the pan, because it's obviously only useful for keeping the parchment in place, yeah? But I like the Lebovitz method. Nice tip.

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I use Bake-Clean spray and parchment. I spray sides and bottom edges well, collar the side with parchment and just line the bottom with a square that fits without overlapping the side. I do not spray the inner side of the parchment paper. The dry collar gives me more rise.

Theresa :smile:


"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power."

- Abraham Lincoln

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We were always taught in pastry and baking, by the inimitable Nick Malgieri, to butter the pan, put parchment in and then butter the parchment.

I was taught by the more efficient David Lebovitz to butter the pan, put in the parchment, then flip over the parchment. Voila, the parchment is already greased. :wink:

That is a good tip! I always sprayed the pan with spray oil, then parchment, up the sides of the pan. Just so I don't have to worry about the cake sticking.


"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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I'm wondering if recipe authors sometimes tell you to grease the parchment purely out of habit. The stuff has silicone in it and should release. Are there categories of baked goods that will stick to ungreased parchment? I've never experimented with this.


Notes from the underbelly

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Nothing really sticks to parchment. I make caramel on a bi-wekly basis and I pour it on.... a parchment paper lined marble slab. No release issues--even if the caramel has been sitting on the paper for a few days.

The only reason I can think of why you would want to butter parchment, is to make it "stick" onto the bottom or sides of the pan so the paper doesn't get shifted or jostled around when pouring/portioning batter.

P.S. If you ask a bakery supply delivery driver "What's the biggest mess you can make?" It's not spilled flour or oil or even peanut butter, It's picking up 500 sheets of parchemtn paper that slide out of a box. Nothing sticks to that stuff........

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Nothing really sticks to parchment. I make caramel on a bi-wekly basis and I pour it on.... a parchment paper lined marble slab. No release issues--even if the caramel has been sitting on the paper for a few days.

I always just put mine on a silpat. I will have to try parchment, it will keep from tying up my silpat.


"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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