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lebowits

A Rasher (Re-hash) of Bacon

32 posts in this topic

I tried the chocolate bacon bar, but I was not that impressed. Now a maple, bacon sweet something would be good. But I think the whole bacon craze has gotten a little out of hand at this point. :biggrin: I am definately not on the side of "bacon goes with anything"

I've got these great maple sugar chunks - wonder how dark milk, with the canadian maple flavour, bacon, maple chunks and smoked salt would taste?

Sounds dangerous my friend....dangerously delish.... :laugh:


"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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Came across an article in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinal . Thought some of you may enjoy reading it. Apparently they had a professional and amateur contest showcasing bacon in deserts. The winner of the amateur category was chocolate bacon baklava and the profesional contest winner was bacon toffee truffles. They have a few rescipes at the bottom.

Clark

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So the aW of the bacon bark is 0.47 - well below the levels for any sort of contamination with either molds or bacteria.

I guess the 6 month shelf life is likely due to flavour drop off rather than any sort of concerns about contamination of the product.

Thinking of attempting a bacon bark for Valentine's day as an option for the ladies to give to them men in their lives :raz: . Was wondering if when you make your bacon bark do you put any of the rendered fat that's cooked from the bacon into the chocolate itself? Is this even an option or am I speaking crazy talk! I have a sneaky feeling it would throw off the temper in the chocolate, but you are far more an expert than me so I thought I'd get your take before I go and destroy a nice batch of dark chocolate on this hair-brained idea :smile:

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So the aW of the bacon bark is 0.47 - well below the levels for any sort of contamination with either molds or bacteria.

I guess the 6 month shelf life is likely due to flavour drop off rather than any sort of concerns about contamination of the product.

Thinking of attempting a bacon bark for Valentine's day as an option for the ladies to give to them men in their lives :raz: . Was wondering if when you make your bacon bark do you put any of the rendered fat that's cooked from the bacon into the chocolate itself? Is this even an option or am I speaking crazy talk! I have a sneaky feeling it would throw off the temper in the chocolate, but you are far more an expert than me so I thought I'd get your take before I go and destroy a nice batch of dark chocolate on this hair-brained idea :smile:

I don't add any of the bacon fat - that would result in a chocolate that is much softer (gianduja vs chocolate) - just really crispy bits of bacon and some smoked salt to dark milk chocolate.

When I want to use up the bacon fat - then I make bacon truffles with it instead.

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So the aW of the bacon bark is 0.47 - well below the levels for any sort of contamination with either molds or bacteria.

I guess the 6 month shelf life is likely due to flavour drop off rather than any sort of concerns about contamination of the product.

Thinking of attempting a bacon bark for Valentine's day as an option for the ladies to give to them men in their lives :raz: . Was wondering if when you make your bacon bark do you put any of the rendered fat that's cooked from the bacon into the chocolate itself? Is this even an option or am I speaking crazy talk! I have a sneaky feeling it would throw off the temper in the chocolate, but you are far more an expert than me so I thought I'd get your take before I go and destroy a nice batch of dark chocolate on this hair-brained idea :smile:

I don't add any of the bacon fat - that would result in a chocolate that is much softer (gianduja vs chocolate) - just really crispy bits of bacon and some smoked salt to dark milk chocolate.

When I want to use up the bacon fat - then I make bacon truffles with it instead.

That makes complete sense. Off to buy some bacon then to the kitchen! Thanks Kerry :smile:

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