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Ufimizm

Green Onion Sausage Recipe

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I was wondering if anyone could help me out with a recipe for this. I live in central Wisconsin and a friend came back with a grab bag of wonderful sausage from Louisiana, (excellent boudin, garlic sausage, etc.) The most amazing thing she brought back was fresh Green Onion sausage from Rouses Grocery store. I have to say I fell in love with it immediately. Everyone I shared it with loved it as well. I make my own sausage so I have the tools and techniques to make it. The seasonings seemed basic, but I would like to try to get some direction, before trying to create my own and end up messing things up. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

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Yes, indeed, Rouse's Supermarket has tasty green onion sausage. Which reminds me that the humble green onion is one of Cajun/Creole cooking's less celebrated ingredients, and that Rouse's sells fresh hog casings in the meat department, encouraging our local home sausage making traditions. Anyway, back to the sausage: most fresh cajun sausages are seasoned with a dry, finely ground spice blend; the Rouse's version, to my taste buds, contains at least garlic, cayenne, black pepper, salt, and thyme (and probably other things). The chopped green onions are mixed with the seasoned pork just before the sausage is stuffed into the (natural) casings.

Because of the fresh green onions, this sausage has a short shelf life and it doesn't freeze especially well. Mixed half & half with lean beef, it makes a killer hamburger. It's a nice base for dirty rice, too.

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Great tip about using it to make hamburgers!

I noticed over at Cajun Grocers, the ingredients for Tony Chachere's Green Onion Pork Sausage are listed as follows:

Pork, water, green onion, salt, sugar, spices, garlic, sodium nitrite.

Of course, 'spices' are the trick, here.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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The seasoning was simple. Salt, Pepper, Thyme, Garlic...? I know I am missing some seasonings. I would assume maybe some sage in there as well. It was not spicy, but then again I could probably a small touch of cayenne in it as well It was just such a nice clean tasting sausage. I want more of it as I sit here and type.

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