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FDA ban on raw oysters!


PopsicleToze
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Louisiana's oyster industry facing perious dangers from FDA's new ban that only targets Gulf oysters.

Times Picayune article here: Louisiana blasts new FDA rule requiring oysters to be sterilized to prevent rare bacterial illness

"The rule will essentially eliminate raw oysters -- at least as Louisianans know them -- from restaurant menus for seven months of the year. Even oysters that will eventually be cooked during those months would have to go through the same cleansing process before being added to any dish, a move some say would undermine the culinary integrity of some of New Orleans' most famous delicacies."

Seattle wonders if Northwest oysters will be next...

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The seafood industry has faced monumental challenges in the past few years and now this could cripple or kill many South Louisiana restaurants. There's already warning signs posted in every restaurant that sells raw oysters warning patrons about the potential dangers. I do not see why the FDA feels so compelled to do this when there are so many greater threats around. Aren't they eaten raw practically around the world?

The Louisiana Restaurant Association is urging restaurants, fishermen and the public to call their members of Congress and the White House to get the FDA to rescind its plan.

Rhonda

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My understanding was that this "r" month thing is related to the reproductive cycle of oysters, not air transport.

See, for example, this article on Sexless Oysters, which was part of the title of a book by Northwest writer Adam Woog on Northwest inventions.

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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My understanding was that this "r" month thing is related to the reproductive cycle of oysters, not air transport.

See, for example, this article on Sexless Oysters, which was part of the title of a book by Northwest writer Adam Woog on Northwest inventions.

Yes, the R month rule has to do with spawning cycles. It's not relevant in Gulf Coast, because the warmer waters mean that oysters spawn continuously year-round. Despite this, many believe (and I would agree) that even Gulf oysters task better in colder months.

On the other hand, the bacteria vibrio vulnificus has been shown to increase when water temperature rises in the summer. That is the danger that the FDA (rightly or wrongly) is concerned about.

Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"

Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

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I'm surprised that there isn't more concern. It's a pretty big industry, and it's not just Louisiana -- it's the entire Gulf Region. Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Texas will suffer, too.

The Gulf region supplies about two-thirds of U.S. oysters, and some people in the $500 million industry argue that the anti-bacterial procedures are too costly. They insist adequate measures are already being taken to battle germs, including increased refrigeration on oyster boats and warnings posted in restaurants.

Avery Bates, vice president of the Organized Seafood Association-Alabama, predicted two-thirds of Alabama's 50 "mom-and-pop oyster shops" would close, mostly because of the cost of treating oysters.

"It's like swatting a fly with a sledgehammer," pretty much sums it up -- if we didn't have to worry about all of the people who will be economically devastated by this.

Rhonda

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