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French (?) truffles


chocoera
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hey friends :)

everyone getting excited for the holidays? first halloween...not too exciting, but a chance to do some scary desserts, then thanksgiving (pumpkin? cranberry? raisins and cinnamon? gosh...we could have so much fun!) then christmas, and we all are getting a bit crazy and worried about the christmas rush (or is that just me?) :rolleyes:

before i can enjoy the holidays though, i have the task of creating a classic chocolate truffle. known as a french truffle maybe? (just what i've heard) my dad is hosting a "vintage" party for some out-of-state biz clients and thought chocolate dipped dried fruit and ginger and some of those rustic, super creamy, cocoa covered balls of ganache would be perfect. problem is, i don't ever make handrolled truffles. i do molded chocolates (more fluid ganache) and some hand cut and dipped chocolates, make ganache, slab, cure and cut, which obviously are a bit firmer.

so i didnt know if anyone had any tips, tricks or recipe and ratio ideas for this type of chocolate treat? i use the e.guittard rouge cocoa powder, and thought that maybe if i slab ganache and cut, THEN roll, they would be more equally sized? and then hand roll them around in some tempered (or untempered?!) chocolate, then that goes directly into a pan of cocoa powder, roll around and shake off excess in mesh strainer? should that be tempered or untempered chocolate you think?

and i want more than just chocolatey goodness in this truffle...always thought these guys had an alcohol spike in them? whiskey? brandy? maybe that apple calvados? (anyone used this?) or pear williams? but nothing that would make someone spit it out...just enough to go...huh...what's that? mmm....lovely :) *trust me, i have had one of those alcohol spit them out type chocolates...and i LOVE alcohol* (wait, that came out wrong...) :wink: anyway, just hoping for a memorable chocolate, something with flavor, and firm enough to roll and hold shape (not sure for ratios on this), but soft enough to almost literally melt in your mouth.....thoughts?

also, side note, dad wanted to know if these were rolled in cocoa powder, could we "glue" a tiny chocolate decoration to the top? or would the chocolate not stick to the cocoa powder surface? (he wanted to personalize with chocolate biz logo, i have it on some transfers for him that i made)

thanks you guys! :wub:

Edited by chocoera (log)
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I'd go with a slab recipe - spiked with your booze of choice (I like Kirsh or a fortified wine) - pipe or pour into a shallow container and scoop out when they firm up. Roll in your hands as soon as you are able to get rid of any edges - dip in tempered chocolate then roll while still wet in cocoa mixed with powdered sugar.

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I would add a small change to Kerry's excellent advice, bearing in mind that I am adding the words of the novice to those of the master. :wub:

Rather than scooping up the centers from the slabbed ganache, I would turn out the ganache, cut it into squares, and then roll each square in your hands quickly to make the balls. This I think is faster and less trouble. Oh well, it's what I do. :hmmm:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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an alcohol spike in them? whiskey? brandy? maybe that apple calvados? (anyone used this?) or pear williams? but nothing that would make someone spit it out...just enough to go...huh...what's that? mmm....lovely

Grand Marnier always works well.

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If you search diligently, you can find recipes on the internet for "bourbon balls" (or rum, or Kaluha) that don't start with a basis of cookie crumbs. I KNOW I have quite a few bookmarked, but I'm not at my home computer to find them. Maybe later, I hope! :cool:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Here's a basic recipe that I use for liquor truffles that are hand rolled:

8 oz Heavy Cream

8 oz softened butter

4 oz (or to taste) liquor

13 oz semisweet chocolate

4.5 oz milk chocolate

Scald cream, pour over chopped chocolate. Let sit for few minutes, then stir until emulsified.

Add softened butter, then liquor. Chill. Scoop with small ice cream scoop, roll into balls and

roll in cocoa powder.

If the ganache is too soft, you may want to roll them in chocolate before the cocoa powder. (no need to

temper it as long as you're rolling the truffles in cocoa)

I've often made this recipe with Grand Marnier, B&B or Framgeilco. You may have to play with the

butter / chocolate ratio.

Beaches Pastry

May your celebrations be sweet!

Beaches Pastry Blog

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you guys never disappoint :) i got the juices flowing i think i can tackle this one :) thanks for the thoughts and opinions....thinking i might lean towards the grand marnier and slabbing/cutting/rolling method!

and kerry...did you mean roll 1/2 the batch in cocoa and 1/2 the batch in powdered sugar? or did you mean mix the two? hmmmmm just wanted to clarify!

look for a picture and recipe next week (thanks beacheschef for some ratios!!)

:raz:

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you guys never disappoint :) i got the juices flowing i think i can tackle this one :) thanks for the thoughts and opinions....thinking i might lean towards the grand marnier and slabbing/cutting/rolling method!

and kerry...did you mean roll 1/2 the batch in cocoa and 1/2 the batch in powdered sugar? or did you mean mix the two? hmmmmm just wanted to clarify!

look for a picture and recipe next week (thanks beacheschef for some ratios!!)

:raz:

Mix - cocoa by itself can be a bit of a shock to some.

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you guys never disappoint :) i got the juices flowing i think i can tackle this one :) thanks for the thoughts and opinions....thinking i might lean towards the grand marnier and slabbing/cutting/rolling method!

and kerry...did you mean roll 1/2 the batch in cocoa and 1/2 the batch in powdered sugar? or did you mean mix the two? hmmmmm just wanted to clarify!

look for a picture and recipe next week (thanks beacheschef for some ratios!!)

:raz:

Mix - cocoa by itself can be a bit of a shock to some.

Definitely mix them. The powdered sugar cuts the bitterness of the cocoa powder and provides a nice soft, hand made look.

Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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  • 2 weeks later...

gallery_60295_6566_181927.jpg

gallery_60295_6566_1375824.jpg

tried a couple recipes and techniques, but went with grewling's with grand marnier and actually piped the ganache, let it crust a tad and then rolled. after initial rolling, hand rolled in untempered chocolate and dropped in cocoa mix. thought these turned out well...ganache was silky and soft enough to melt in your mouth, but firm enough to roll...did the powdered sugar/cocoa combination and it tasted great. thought we got the look of "a real truffle" like the ones dug out of the ground too.

thanks for all your help, :wub: they were a hit and i learned something new!!

best always :0)

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these truffles became hard enough to roll just at room temperature? i made some using a 2:1 ratio i put it in the fridge to be able to roll them but out at room temp you have to handle them pretty gingerly as the ganache isn't as thick as i'd like it to be

Danny

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yup, the ganache is pretty thin right off the bat, i just put it in a hotel pan to cure for a couple hours, and when still soft, put it in a pastry bag and piped. the agitation crystalized it and if you wait 10 min after piping, it has a little crust on it, and then its firm enough to roll into a ball :) if you need the recipe, just let me know!!!

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