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Candy Apples


Lilija
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I have a craving, and I need a candy apple. I decided to minimize the damage and bring a batch of them to a party on Saturday, so I can have one, and share the rest.

I found some decent recipes, I think. Basic stuff, sugar, corn syrup, red food coloring. Can anyone share success stories and tips? Also, best ways to transport them? I don't want caramel or chocolate, or anything like that. No cinnamon flavors, or embellishments, just a very substantial coating of crunchy red candy on a tart apple.

Steer me in the right direction, please?

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I have nothing to add except spiritual support. My wife makes them the way you describe, they always look and taste good.

I find an entire candy-coated apple with the Popsicle stick intimidating, and for that reason I favour the coated wedges.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Coated wedges, you say? That's very interesting, I didn't think that would work, because of the exposed moisture. Do you know how she does that, generally? I'd like that even better, since the party I'm attending is at a bowling alley. Wedges would be way easier to deal with.

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My only comment was going to be that I like the concept of candy apples but find them very unwieldy. The idea of wedges is great - you might actually be able to take a proper bite, rather than with the full ones where I spend 10 minutes licking the toffee (which isn't a bad thing!) and then taking bites of the sour apple... being able to combine the two would be great!

I thought of the chinese-style apples... they batter and deep fry chunks of apple before applying a toffee. I wonder if the batter helps block the moisture from dissolving the sugar too quickly. But I'm not sure how those last anyway so maybe not.

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Oh, see, when I bite into a candy apple, I go full bore, and just take a chomp out of the side of the thing, hence the bleeding gums.

I've been reading. Some say boil the apples for 10 seconds to melt the wax off the skin. Some say freeze for a half hour to get the coating to stick. I wonder if all this heat/cold would affect the texture or lasting power of the apples. Well, they only have to live overnight, I plan on making them Friday night for an early Sat get together.

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I make them for Halloween and use small apples, too. With the limited amount of coating in the pan, if you try to use large apples, after the first few are coated, the remainder of the coating doesn't coat the whole apple so that you have an area near the stem that is naked. I just stick a craft popsicle stick in them then wrap with parchment paper and tie with ribbon. I've seen them with little twigs used for the stick, and that's cute. I guess they used fake ones bought at craft stores because I can't imagine finding sticks in the woods and trying to clean well enough to stick in an apple! :rolleyes: However, the popsicle sticks are inexpensive and they work well. I have the recipe at home somewhere and can dig it up if needed.

candy apples.jpg

(Jaymes' caramel corn is on left and peanut brittle is on right.)

Rhonda

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Would it be too much trouble to dig up your recipe? It certainly seems like what I'm looking for. They're beautiful, all those snackies look great. I like the idea of parchment wrapping, too. I live near a candy-making supply store, so I can get all this stuff in one trip.

RWood, I hadn't considered the sweating and condensation part of cooling the apples, thanks for mentioning it. It makes total sense. I have a few dozen apples that I just picked from an orchard, they're a little large, but I think the unwaxed kind of rough skin might be just the thing for candy coating. I'll just have to use a very deep narrow pot, maybe.

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Here's the recipe. If the coating is too light, you can double-dip the apple, but work quickly.

Unsalted butter, for parchment paper

2 cups sugar

3/4 cup water

1/2 cup light corn syrup

1/2 teaspoon red food coloring, (optional)

6 medium apples, or 12 lady apples

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper; butter parchment, and set aside. In a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan, combine sugar, 3/4 cup water, corn syrup, and food coloring, if using. Bring to a boil over high heat; reduce heat to medium-high. Insert candy thermometer and continue to boil until temperature reaches between 300 degrees and 310 degrees (hard crack stage), about 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, insert a wooden stick into the top of each apple, pushing about halfway through; set aside. When mixture reaches temperature, immediately remove from heat. Working quickly, dip apples in sugar mixture until completely coated. Transfer to prepared baking sheet; allow to cool.

Rhonda

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I know this isnt what you want, but last month's Gourmet had a recipe for red-wine caramel candy apples. Simply put, They rock.

October 2009

Red wine reduction is a simple yet sultry addition to the caramel that enrobes these apples. Its rounded, fruity acidity balances the sweetness, making a fall favorite feel particularly special. View more of our favorite recipes from this issue.

8 small McIntosh apples, stemmed, washed well, and dried

1 1/2 cups red wine

2 cups sugar

1/2 cup water

6 tablespoons heavy cream

Equipment:8 wooden ice-pop sticks; a candy thermometer

Insert a wooden stick halfway into each apple at stem end. Line a tray with wax paper and lightly grease paper.

Boil wine in a small saucepan over medium heat until reduced to 1/2 cup, 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

Bring sugar and water to a boil in a 21/2- to 3-qt heavy saucepan over medium heat, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then wash down any sugar crystals from side of pan with a pastry brush dipped in cold water. Boil, without stirring, swirling pan occasionally so caramel colors evenly, until dark amber. Add reduced wine (mixture will bubble up and steam) and swirl pan. Add cream and simmer, stirring, until incorporated, then continue to simmer until thermometer registers 238°F. Remove from heat and cool to 200°F.

Holding apples by the sticks, dip them in caramel and swirl to coat, letting excess drip off, then hold apples up (stick end down) for about 15 seconds to allow more caramel to set on apples. Put caramel apples, stick side up, on greased wax paper and let stand until caramel firms up, about 30 minutes.

cooks’ note: If caramel becomes too thick to coat apples, reheat over low heat to loosen

"It only hurts if it bites you" - Steve Irwin

"Whats another word for Thesaurus?" - Me

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