Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

MikeHartnett

Cooking with the Momofuku cookbook

Recommended Posts

I know that the broth we make at Noodle Bar TO is pretty much identical to the cookbook, with an added pigs head. The freeze dried version is way too expensive to be viable at the moment, the biggest saving for it is time.

Thank you for your input. What do you mean by freeze-dried version?

For me the biggest issue was that the Lucky Peach version calls for only 2.25kg chicken necks and not a lot of butchers will sell you that in bulk. I do not own one at the moment, but I was thinking that this recipe could be probably be sped up in a pressure cooker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that the broth we make at Noodle Bar TO is pretty much identical to the cookbook, with an added pigs head. The freeze dried version is way too expensive to be viable at the moment, the biggest saving for it is time.

Thank you for your input. What do you mean by freeze-dried version?

For me the biggest issue was that the Lucky Peach version calls for only 2.25kg chicken necks and not a lot of butchers will sell you that in bulk. I do not own one at the moment, but I was thinking that this recipe could be probably be sped up in a pressure cooker.

Sorry, I skipped over the part when you mentioned the Lucky Peach version, and assumed you were referring to this ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having been to Momofuku Seiōbo in the past few weeks and trying the pork bun, I've been dying to make it at home.

I made up the pork belly earlier in the week and today was bun day.

The mixture recommended in the cookbook makes fifty buns. This is my stash (less a few that made it into pork buns and a few that I decided to sacrifice to try out a more conventional pork bun to see what the dough was capable of).

This is a picture of the momofuku style buns:

Buns.jpg

This is a more conventional type pork bun cut in half to show the texture:

pork bun.jpg

The buns worked extremely well, as did the pork belly.

I agree with Scottyboy that it is good to follow the instructions in the book but I'd add a few caveats:

First, David Chang is very tactile and accurate in his descriptions. Listen carefully if he says that the pork belly needs to be spring like a pillow when it is finished cooking.

Similarly, his description of the bun dough as coming together on the dough hook and not being too tacky is very accurate.

This leads into my other hint. As with all dough recipes there is an illusion of accuracy in measuring. Particularly with the US cup measurements, which are so inaccurate they are frustrating. I consulted the web to get equivalents for metric measurements but this led to a dough that was far too sticky. I wound up adding over 100g extra flour to get the mix correct.

Even then when I went to shape the dough, it was not suitable for a rolling pin as was. I wound up squashing the dough balls into a disk shape using (dry) hands. I then used my (clean) cappuccino chocolate shaker filled with plain flour and lightly dusted the surface. This allowed me to roll the dough out into an oval as instructed. I then used a lard dipped chopstick to execute the fold, as directed. They worked extremely well with this minor modification and, as can be seen, were very light and an ideal counterpoint to the pork and pickle textures.

42 buns have gone into the freezer in vacuum bags. I adjusted the timing to get sufficient vacuum to remove most of the air, but not sufficient to crush the buns.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone still cooking with this book? I return to it regularly. 

 

Tonight I made the pork sausage w/ rice cakes. A bunch of people ... somewhere--people suggested pan-frying them, as per the other dok recipe in the book--was the way to go. And random people on the internet must surely know better than David Chang. So that's what I did. Only I pan-fried them in wagyu fat instead of neutral oil. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone still cooking with this book? I return to it regularly. 

 

Tonight I made the pork sausage w/ rice cakes. A bunch of people ... somewhere--people suggested pan-frying them, as per the other dok recipe in the book--was the way to go. And random people on the internet must surely know better than David Chang. So that's what I did. Only I pan-fried them in wagyu fat instead of neutral oil. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Made Pork Belly Ssam with mustard sauce last week, and it was truly excellent. Made something from it a couple of weeks ago, but for the life of me cannot bring it back to the top of the brain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cannot open this thread after a spinning class and starving!

Edit to say: I rather shouldn't open...


Edited by Franci (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Cookwhoplaysdrums
      Can anyone suggest me some good books related to Gastronomy, food history, culture, recipes based on different cultures. 
      Also recommend the best food magazine subscriptions. 
    • By artiesel
      THE BOOKS ARE SOLD
       
       
      I have Volumes 1 ,2 and 4 of Jean-Pierre Wybauw's Great Chocolate books are for sale.
       
      The books are in great shape!  There is some tape on the corner of the front of volume 1 that I used to keep it together after a drop.  Volume 1 is also autographed by the author (See pics below).
       
      I'm asking $150 for the lot OBO.
       
      Let me know if interested or if you have questions
       
       
       



    • By umami5
      Has anyone come across a digital version of Practical Professional Cookery (revised 3rd edition) H.L. Cracknell & R.J. Kaufmann.
      I am using this as the textbook for my culinary arts students and a digital version would come in very handy for creating notes and handouts.
    • By Mullinix18
      I dont believe that any English translation of Carêmes works exist. An incomplete version was published in 1842 (I think) but even the that version seems lackluster for the few recipes it does cover. I think it's time the world looks to its past, but I don't speak great French and it's a huge task to undertake. I hopefully plan on publishing this work and anyone who helps me will get a very fair cut, and if we decide not to publish it, I'll put it out on the internet for free. I'm working in Google docs so we can collaborate. I'm first cataloging the index to cross reference the pre-existing incomplete English version to give us a reference of what yet needs to be done, and from there we will go down the list of recipies and Translate them one by one. Simple google translate goes only so far, as it is 1700s French culinary terms and phrases being used. I'd like to preserve as much of Carêmes beautiful and flowery language as possible. Who's with me? 
    • By Mullinix18
      I have seen referenced in several places on the internet, including Wikipedia, a stat about escoffier recommending 40 minutes for scrambled eggs in a Bain Marie. I cant find where this number is from. On Wikipedia it refers to the book I currently own, the "Escoffier le guide culinaire" with forward by Heston Blumenthal by h. L. Cracknell...specificly page 157 for the 40 minute cooking time of scrambled eggs but it's not in my book on that page! Even tho there is the recipe for scrambled eggs on that page... I've seen the 1903 first edition online.. And it's not in there either.... Where is this number from?? Id like to know in case there is some even more complete book or something out there that I'm missing. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you. 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×