Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

I'm trying to get into the habit of serving tea with my evening meal, actually. If I'm serving Japanese food, I'll use some genmaicha, and I have a traditional-style oolong I serve with most Chinese dishes. I'm a little worried about the caffeine content some evenings, so I'd like to get some mugi-cha - is that barley tea? Which I think complements meals nicely. My neighbourhood restaurant serves a chamomile tea in the evenings, with full whole buds - I'd never been a fan of chamomile until I tried that.

I also have a few sachets of lemongrass tea I pull out if I've made a Thai or Vietnamese dish.

My parents always had tea after a meal when I was growing up, big mugs of builder's tea with evaporated milk. I don't think I could handle that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You may find this topic on Barley Tea of interest. Maybe also this one on Korean Roasted Corn Tea.

I drink chamomile quite often in the evenings, but not with food. What foods do you think it pairs well with?

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I make any type of Asian food--Chinese, Viet or Japanese--I like beer or tea. Well, more likely beer in hot weather. But one of my favorite meals is home-made potstickers and a pot of tea. Until recently, when caffeine as well as acid content was not an issue for me, I liked Genmai Cha or Chinese Jasmine Green tea, a particular brand that's cheap and delicious that I buy in Chinatown here. Lately I've been drinking White Peony Jasmine tea, which is typically brewed weak and seems to have minimal caffeine. If money was no object I would be drinking Jasmine buds or pearls. A friend received a lavish gift of just pearls and it was heavenly.

I went through a phase two years ago where I became addicted to this meal for lunch during the fall and holiday months: pear or apple, Stilton on buttered crackers (talk about rich) and Earl Grey. I switched every few months or so between Earl G with lavender, and Earl G with bergamot, always with milk.

Other nice pairings: Rice pudding and Keemun. Steel cut oatmeal and English Breakfast tea.

As for chamomile, well, I have a hard time with that one. It seems like something a goat or sheep would graze on. Maybe with buttered wheat toast, a jar of apricot baby food and a couple of Advil?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I drink chamomile quite often in the evenings, but not with food. What foods do you think it pairs well with?

It seems to cut the oil in a lot of the fried dishes I end up ordering. I'm going to experiment more, and see what goes best with it.

As for chamomile, well, I have a hard time with that one. It seems like something a goat or sheep would graze on. Maybe with buttered wheat toast, a jar of apricot baby food and a couple of Advil?

I used to agree with you, but when they serve it in china, they use several spoons full of whole dried blossoms. The flavour is delicate, but not pallid or grassy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the quality of chamomile varies widely. Most I see in grocery stores, from Asian groceries to the high end Central Market, is pretty pitiful looking. I have been getting superb Chamomile for years from The Cultured Cup; they have been great at sourcing the best. A heaping teaspoon per cup for five minutes or two or three teaspoons for two or three minutes, both good.

I'll be interested to see what you find out as far as chamomile pairing goes, Erin.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I more often drink tea by itself, or make it according to what tea I'm interested in drinking at the time. I've never deliberately paired it with food. If what I'm eating doesn't pair well with the tea I have ready, I drink water until the food is gone, then resume with the tea.

I have noticed, no surprise, that almost any tea goes well with bland buttery cookies, but not all teas stand up well to strongly spiced curries. That's about as far as I've gotten.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

The 2009 Spring Norbu - Lao Mansa Sheng Pu-Erh Tea that we are tasting hereis the fist tea I've had that begs to be enjoyed with food. I have enjoyed it with buttered toast with jam and today I had it with a little bit of crab with butter that I had for lunch. I like this tea very much on its own but with food it is even more enjoyable.

There is one Chinese restaurant that I frequent in Cleveland and I have taken to drinking their "flower tea" (chrysanthimum) with my meals there. They usually serve a low grade jasmine tea but I don't care for that with food. Some how I stumbled across the fact that they serve chrysanthemum tea and I'm glad I did.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found that tea and wine and food have some fantastic synergies. Just wine and tea can complement each other and bring out nuances... Try a NZ Sauv. Blanc after a few sips of a ginseng ooling for a real shock of pleasure to the taste buds.

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

I had a really cool tea/food pairing occur spontaneously last night. I was drinking a very nice Da Hong Pao sample I was sent a while back while making stock and doing some general kitchen work, and I ended up cooking up a link of Morcilla de Cebolla (Spanish blood sausage with onions) that I found at Central Market as a treat. Morcilla is one of my favorite occasional indulgences when I can find it, but I never tried to pair a tea with it because I just assumed its assertive, super irony & mineraly flavors would overpower any tea. Well, long story short, I took a bite and then sort of absent-mindedly took a sip of the Da Hong Pao and was very pleased with the results. Something about the mineraly flavor of the morcilla went perfectly (to my taste buds at least) with the earthy/mineraly/woodsy/fruity flavors of the tea. In the oolong topic, people have been discussing a hard to describe mineraly "rock" taste in the Wuyi oolongs, and this pairing really highlighted this aspect of the flavor profile that my palate tended to accept and overlook as just a part of the flavor of the individual tea cultivars. This was totally unexpected, but it looks like I'm going to be pairing Wu Yi teas with more irony dishes containing game or offal or whatever else that has a mineral component in the taste from now on. I love happy accidents like this.

Greg

www.norbutea.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a really cool tea/food pairing occur spontaneously last night. I was drinking a very nice Da Hong Pao sample I was sent a while back while making stock and doing some general kitchen work, and I ended up cooking up a link of Morcilla de Cebolla (Spanish blood sausage with onions) that I found at Central Market as a treat. Morcilla is one of my favorite occasional indulgences when I can find it, but I never tried to pair a tea with it because I just assumed its assertive, super irony & mineraly flavors would overpower any tea. Well, long story short, I took a bite and then sort of absent-mindedly took a sip of the Da Hong Pao and was very pleased with the results. Something about the mineraly flavor of the morcilla went perfectly (to my taste buds at least) with the earthy/mineraly/woodsy/fruity flavors of the tea. In the oolong topic, people have been discussing a hard to describe mineraly "rock" taste in the Wuyi oolongs, and this pairing really highlighted this aspect of the flavor profile that my palate tended to accept and overlook as just a part of the flavor of the individual tea cultivars. This was totally unexpected, but it looks like I'm going to be pairing Wu Yi teas with more irony dishes containing game or offal or whatever else that has a mineral component in the taste from now on. I love happy accidents like this.

That is very interesting. I would have thought that the minerality of a tea like that would have made the iron/minerality of the sausage too much. Cool that it worked so well together.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a happy accident today, eating garlic potatoes with some of my favorite white bud sheng puerh from norbu. There is so much garlic in these potatoes that I ca still taste it, and it blends brilliantly with this puerh.

I like that white bud sheng pu erh from Norbu. I had it last week with a very rich brunch and it was a nice pairing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That is very interesting. I would have thought that the minerality of a tea like that would have made the iron/minerality of the sausage too much. Cool that it worked so well together.

The mineraly component of the Da Hong Pao is pretty subtle to my taste, so I didn't think it was too much at all. Frankly, I had never thought of some of the flavors of a tea like Da Hong Pao as "mineraly" at all until I read some of the posts on the oolong topic. I just accepted it and considered it an unnamed (or perhaps un-reflected-upon by me) part of the Wu Yi Yan Cha flavor profile, so after thinking about the "rock/mineral taste" I wasn't surprised to see some harmony emerge with an assertively irony dish like blood sausage. I really didn't focus on how the subtle sweet/fruity aspects of Yan Cha really set the morcilla off in my post, but, to make a comparison to the wine world, I imagine this tea paired up with it just like a red wine with some fruit and mineral components would have. I should say that I really like uber-assertive & bold flavors, though (which is why I cook & eat like a Szechuan/Korean grandmother with an iron stomach most of the time), so this pairing might not be suitable to everyone's tastes.

Greg

www.norbutea.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some people may wish to note that the tannins in tea interfere with the absorption of non-heme iron, so that those suffering from iron deficiency are advised to wait an hour after meals before drinking tea. However, there is some evidence that regular tea drinkers adapt by secreting high levels of proteins in the saliva which bind with tannins so that they no longer interfere with iron absorption. As an iron-deficient lover of tea with meals, I was very happy to learn that the answer may be to DRINK MORE TEA.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As Richard knows, I am far less sophisticated than he is. But I don't think I have shared with him the fact that a traditional British fish and chip "supper" would not be complete unless accompanied by a pot of black tea, served with milk, of course. Darjeeling would be my choice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The depth of knowledge among the members of egullet never fails to astound me!

I spent a bit of time on a farm in Germany (Schleswig Holstein) years ago, and the evening meal, Abendbrot, was often eaten with tea. I only remember people taking it black, usually with sugar and often in glasses rather than cups or mugs. Abendbrot was always a variety of cold cuts, cheeses, etc (maybe also a cold boiled egg leftover from breakfast or a piece of meat from lunch) eaten on bread as an open sandwich with a knife and fork.

I still enjoy a cup of tea with rye bread and cheese or ham or salami. It works with a wide variety of teas, but I like it best with something lighter and slightly fragrant. Lady Grey is my current favourite. The flavours of the food are strong, but the tea seems to enhance it rather than be swallowed by it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Even though I would like to change the situation, the winter is coming. Sooner or later there will be sharp winds, frost and unpleasant moisture. I don't know how you like to warm up at home, but on the first cold day I dust off my home recipe for hot and yummy winter teas.

      You can use my recipe or come up with your own proposals for fiery mixtures. Only one thing should be the same: your favourite tea must be strong and hot.

      Ingredients (for 2 teas)
      Raspberry-orange
      8 cloves
      a piece of cinnamon
      2 grains of cardamom
      4 slices of orange
      2 teaspoons of honey
      your favourite tea
      50ml of raspberry juice or 30ml of raspberry juice and 30ml of raspberry liqueur
      Add 4 of the cloves, cinnamon and cardamom to some water and boil for a while to release their flavour and aroma. Remove the seasoning and brew the tea with this water. Crush two slices of orange with honey. Add the raspberry juice or a mixture of juice and liqueur to the tea. Next add the honey with orange. Mix it in. Decorate the tea with the rest of the cloves and orange.

      Lemon-ginger
      8 cloves
      3 slices of fresh ginger
      2 grains of cardamom
      50ml of ginger syrup or 30ml of ginger syrup and 30ml of ginger-lemon liqueur
      4 slices of lemon
      2 teaspoons of honey
      Add 4 of the cloves, ginger and cardamom to some water and boil for a while to release their flavour and aroma. Remove the seasoning and brew the tea with this water. Crush two slices of lemon with honey. Add the ginger syrup or mixture of syrup and liqueur to the tea. Next add honey with lemon. Mix it in. Decorate the tea with the rest of the cloves and lemon.

      Enjoy your drink!

    • By liuzhou
      China's favorite urinating “tea pet” is actually a thermometer.
    • By Johnhouse
      Hello everyone!
       
      I have been working in food and beverage industry for almost 10 years in different countries. I am looking forward to learn new things on this forum to expand my food and beverage knowledge as well as sharing my experiences that I gained in my journey!
       
      Have a good day! ☺️ 
    • By MattJohnson
      I've been a big coffee fan for years, but lately, I've been drinking more tea.
      Where do you get your tea? Do you have an importer you like? An online store you frequent. I've been buying tea from Rishi at stores in the Milwaukee area (they are located in the area too) and have been very happy.
      One of my favorites so far is the Earl Green. Very tasty.
      .... sorry if there is a thread like this already, I did a quick search but didn't see anything....
    • By liuzhou
      This arose from this topic, where initially @Anna N asked about tea not being served at the celebratory meal I attended. I answered that it is uncommon for tea to be served with meals (with one major exception). I was then asked for further elucidation by @Smithy. I did start replying on the topic but the answer got longer than I anticipated and was getting away from the originally intended topic about one specific meal. So here were are..
       
      I'd say there are four components to tea drinking in China.

      a) When you arrive at a restaurant, you are often given a pot of tea which people will sip while contemplating the menu and waiting for other  guests to arrive. Dining out is very much a group activity, in the main. When everyone is there and the food dishes start to arrive the tea is nearly always forgotten about. The tea served like this will often be a fairly cheap, common brand - usually green.
       
      You also may be given a cup of tea in a shop if your purchase is a complicated one. I recently bought a new lap top and the shop assistant handed me tea to sip as she took down the details of my requirements. Also, I recently had my eyes re-tested in order to get new spectacles. Again, a cup of tea was provided. Visit someone in an office or have a formal meeting and tea or water will be provided.
       
      b) You see people walking about with large flasks (not necessarily vacuum flasks) of tea which they sip during the day to rehydrate themselves. Taxi drivers, bus drivers, shop keepers etc all have their tea flask.  Of course, the tea goes cold. I have a vacuum flask, but seldom use it - not a big tea fan. There are shops just dedicated to selling the drinks flasks.
       
      c) There has been a recent fashion for milk tea and bubble tea here, two trends imported from Hong Kong and Taiwan respectively. It is sold from kiosks and mainly attracts younger customers. McDonald's and KFC both do milk and bubble teas.
       

      Bubble and Milk Tea Stall
       

      And Another
       

      And another - there are hundreds of them around!
       

      McDonald's Ice Cream and Drinks Kiosk.


      McDonald's Milk Tea Ad
       
      d) There are very formal tea tastings and tea ceremonies, similar in many ways to western wine tastings. These usually take place in tea houses where you can sample teas and purchase the tea for home use. These places can be expensive and some rare teas attract staggering prices. The places doing this pride themselves on preparing the tea perfectly and have their special rituals. I've been a few times, usually with friends, but it's not really my thing. Below is one of the oldest serious tea houses in the city. As you can see, they don't go out of their way to attract custom. Their name implies they are an educational service as much as anything else. Very expensive!
       

      Tea House

      Supermarkets and corner shops carry very little tea. This is the entire tea shelving in my local supermarket. Mostly locally grown green tea.
       

       

      Local Guangxi Tea
       
      The most expensive in the supermarket was this Pu-er Tea (普洱茶 pǔ ěr chá) from Yunnan province. It works out at ¥0.32per gram as opposed to ¥0.08 for the local stuff. However, in the tea houses, prices can go much, much higher!
       

       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...