Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

Is the reason you haven't posted the recipe for the Apple-Cranberry Chutney because it is going to be in your upcoming book? or is it in another book? If these are the reasons you won't post it then the following applies. In another thread, you told me to call you and you'll tell me the recipe, would you mind sending it to me via email? Thanks. :wub:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Is the reason you haven't posted the recipe for the Apple-Cranberry Chutney because it is going to be in your upcoming book? or is it in another book? If these are the reasons you won't post it then the following applies. In another thread, you told me to call you and you'll tell me the recipe, would you mind sending it to me via email? Thanks. :wub:

What does it mean to you? Getting the recipe that is? :wink:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Aw, come on, I already posted the wubby smilie! :raz: Whaddya want?

Hopefully your sense of galantry will force the recipe out of you when I tell you that, without it, my guests are getting Ocean Spray out of a can!

You have put me in a fix with those words. :rolleyes:

I take very little oil in which I fry some whole red chiles, fennel seeds, very finely chopped ginger and a pinch or two of asafoetida. When the fennel seeds are golden in color, you add the apples and dry cranberries. Saute for as long as the apples need to get soft and almost ready to break down into a mush. You may want to add some water to help soften. Somewhere in the middle of this I add sugar to taste and also balsamic vinegar to taste and some cayenne to taste. And of course salt to taste as well.

Cook to reduce moisture and can as per instructions from Bell Jar catalog for apple chutney.

Was I gallant enough? Subservient enough? :shock::rolleyes::raz:

Edited by Suvir Saran (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Subservient? I hope not. :unsure:

Thanks for the recipe, I'll have to look up some of those ingredients, but I'm sure I'll manage something similar, if not near as good, as the one we were served the other night. I don't plan on making such a whole lot that I'd have to can it, but thanks for the indication that it can be done anyway.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Canning is easy.. and a great way of sharing yourself and giving gifts that bring joy. Takes very little effort to do.. and brings much much joy. Give it a go... I am sure you have done it... But it is really easy... a few minutes of more effort to preserve an hour or more of your effort in planning a recipe.. How can you go wrong. :smile:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I have done canning. In fact, I just opened a jar of strawberry jam I made in 2001 (we picked the strawberries ourselves too). I just was only planning to make a few cupfuls as a Thanksgiving day condiment. (BTW - what kind of apples do you recommend for the recipe?)

For canning, what do you do to it to counteract the low-acidity of the fruit? Does it have to be refrigerated? Shorter storage length?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh, I have done canning. In fact, I just opened a jar of strawberry jam I made in 2001 (we picked the strawberries ourselves too). I just was only planning to make a few cupfuls as a Thanksgiving day condiment. What do you do to it to counteract the low-acidity of the fruit? Does it have to be refrigerated? Shorter storage length?

(BTW - what kind of apples do you recommend for the recipe?)

I use granny smith apples. And in fact I only ever make this for myself with Quinces and can many batches. It is great with Quince. My grandmother salutes me everytime she opens a fresh bottle. You can try it with quince.... You may need water to soften the fruit.

And sorry... I have edited the recipe.. Look above... I forgot.. you will need to add some water to the fruit to help it cook...

The balsamic vinegar helps give the acidity.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, thanks Nina, I hadn't ask where to find them because there are several Indian stores in towns near me, I'm sure I can get what I need there. I was just looking up asafoetida because I was ignorant of this spice. Fortunately, there was an answer available via a quick search right here on eGullet. Click: Asafoetida

Link to post
Share on other sites
The chutney we had a Diwan was definitely not mushy, soft, but not mushy. I assume that batch had not been canned? If you cook it until it is nearly mushy, wouldn't the hot water bath for canning reduce it to applesauce?

Rachel very good questions.

The chutney should be cooked till the apples are almost ready to get mushy... It is the point where the sugar is getting to become caramel like.... I wish I had this recipe written, so I could give you precise answers.

The canning will not make the apples change their consistency. It is very slightly cooked by the process.

Never an issue to worry about in my book.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh, thanks Nina, I hadn't ask where to find them because there are several Indian stores in towns near me, I'm sure I can get what I need there. I was just looking up asafoetida because I was ignorant of this spice. Fortunately, there was an answer available via a quick search right here on eGullet. Click: Asafoetida

All ingredients are easily available as Nina has mentioned.

All the best with the recipe.... Call me .. you have the number or post here.. and I shall help you as much as I can. :smile:

Link to post
Share on other sites
All the best with the recipe.... Call me .. you have the number or post here.. and I shall help you as much as I can. :smile:

...and Suvir's help is far beyond what mere mortals might offer. :wub:

An apple/cranberry chutney adventure is definitely in my future. Thanks, Suvir.

Do you use cranberries with the quince version?

Link to post
Share on other sites
All the best with the recipe.... Call me .. you have the number or post here.. and I shall help you as much as I can. :smile:

...and Suvir's help is far beyond what mere mortals might offer. :wub:

An apple/cranberry chutney adventure is definitely in my future. Thanks, Suvir.

Do you use cranberries with the quince version?

Yes I sure use the cranberries with the Quinces. I have also used sour cherries and had great results as well. Depends on my mood really. :rolleyes:

And I am simply mortal. Nothing more or less. :shock: It is asking for failure to assume or infer I am anything but... You are too kind to all of us Cathy... I am always amazed at how encouraging you are. Thanks!:smile:

Link to post
Share on other sites

As I put together the chutney this morning, I wrote down exactly what I used. Since Suvir didn't specify amounts, I estimated what looked appropriate. The procedure I used is pretty much what Suvir said to do. How does this sound Suvir? The results taste pretty close to what you served at Diwan. :smile:

Suvir's Apple-Cranberry Chutney

1 Tbs. Vegetable Oil

1 Tbs. minced Ginger

1 tsp. minced Red Chile (seeded & deveined)*

1/2 tsp Fennel seed

pinch Asafoetida**

4 cups diced Granny Smith Apple (~3 apples)

1/2 cup dried Cranberries

1/4 cup Water

1/8 tsp Salt

1 Tbs. Sugar

1/2 Tbs. Balsamic Vinegar

pinch dried ground Cayenne Pepper

Heat a 2 quart saucepan, add oil and fry the ginger, chile, fennel and asafoetida. When some of the fennel seeds look toasty (1-2 minutes), add apple, stir to coat with spices. Add cranberries, water, salt, sugar and vinegar, stir, cover for about three minutes, then remove cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the pan is dry and the apples are about ready to fall apart. Check for seasoning and add cayenne pepper to taste.

* I forgot you said to leave it whole, I minced mine, oh well.

** It certainly has a unique smell which becomes savory as it is fried.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Suvir

I can't find cranberries here. What else can be used to replace the cranberries.

I know that you mentioned sour cherries, which may be available here some time during the year. In December I won't find them either, I don't think.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

BlackDuff

Link to post
Share on other sites
Suvir

I can't find cranberries here. What else can be used to replace the cranberries.

I know that you mentioned sour cherries, which may be available here some time during the year. In December I won't find them either, I don't think.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

BlackDuff

Raisins or currants should work just fine. :smile:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Suvir

I can't find cranberries here. What else can be used to replace the cranberries.

I know that you mentioned sour cherries, which may be available here some time during the year. In December I won't find them either, I don't think.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

BlackDuff

Raisins or currants should work just fine. :smile:

Yeah, Raisins definitely and if you want it really hot , infact to protect you against cold and winters, add a sp. of raisins called Munakka (in Hindi).

Munakkas are large raisins which have a deep penetrating heating effect. So 1 tsp of Apple Chutney a day will keep you away from the chill at play.

:biggrin:

Puneet Aggarwal "Sonzy"

Friendly advice on Indian CuisineSonzysKitchen.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

In Indian cooking we often use the word hot for stuff that will produce heat within the body.

Certain ingredients have the capability of heating the body after they have been eaten.

They do not have to have heat (as that we are used to getting from chiles) we ascribe to spices.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Smarmotron
      What sorts of mustards do you like? The type of mustard I like is pungent without a hint of sweetness (fie upon honey mustards), but not too vinegary. Inglehoffer's Stone Ground tends to be rather good, but it's got a little too much vinegar (overpowers the taste of the mustard). What sorts of mustards do you like? Any brands? Or do you make your own?
    • By Eldictator
      Any ideas on how I could put a honey centre in a jelly pastille
    • By Keith Orr
      Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce (Habenero Hot Sauce)
      I thought I'd submit my recipe which is a clone of a locally available sauce here in Portland OR called Secret Aardvark Sauce.
      Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce
      1 – 14.5 oz can of diced tomatoes or roasted tomatoes chopped - include the juice
      1 – 14.5 oz of rice wine vinegar. Use the now empty tomato can to measure
      1-1/2 cups of peeled and grated carrots (packed into the measuring cup)
      1 cup of finely diced white onion
      1/4 cup of yellow mustard
      1/3 cup of sugar
      2 teaspoons of Morton’s Kosher Salt
      1 teaspoon of black pepper
      13 small Habaneros – seeded and membranes removed. (This was 2 oz. of Habaneros before cutting off the tops and removing the seeds and membranes)
      2 teaspoons curry powder
      1 cup of water when cooking
      5 or 6 cloves of garlic - roasted if you've got it
      Put it all in the crockpot on high until everything is tender. About 3 hours  Note: I used the crockpot so I don't have to worry about scorching it while it cooks. 
      Whirl in food processor – Don’t puree until smooth – make it lightly/finely chunky.
      Makes 3 pints - To can process pint jars in a water bath canner for 15 minutes
      I've thought about making this with peaches or mangoes too, but haven't tried it yet.
       
      Edited for clarity on 11/9/2020
       
      Keywords: Hot and Spicy, Carribean, Condiment, Sauce, Easy, Food Processor
      ( RG2003 )
    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
    • By Lisa Shock
      The basic formula for these cakes was developed by the wife of a mayonnaise salesman in an effort to help him out. I did a bit of research, and have found many variations. Early variants generally involve using less cocoa, which I cannot recommend. Later variants involve using cold water instead of boiling, adding salt, and additional leaveners. I personally do not feel that any additional salt is needed, as mayonnaise and that famous, tangy brand of salad dressing (sometimes the label just says 'Dressing') both contain a fair amount of salt. If you are using homemade mayonnaise or a low sodium product, an eighth teaspoon of salt may boost the flavor a bit. And, of course, somewhere along the way fans who prefer a certain salad dressing over mayonnaise started using it to make this cake. Nowadays, the Hellman's website has a different formula -one with added eggs and baking powder. I have not tried this newer formulation.
       
      Some versions of this recipe specify sifted cake flour. This will result in a very light cake with virtually no structural integrity, due to the paucity of eggs in this recipe compared to a regular cake. Cupcakes made this way give beautifully light results. However, every time I try to make a traditional 8" double layer cake with cake flour, I experience collapse. I recommend AP flour or at least a mix of cake and pastry flour.
       
      I have never made this with a gluten-free flour replacer. This recipe does not have very much structural integrity and as such does not make a good candidate for a gluten-free cake.
       
      I have made this cake many times, the type of sandwich spread you choose will affect the outcome. Made with mayonnaise, the cake has a good chocolate flavor and moistness. Made with that famous, tangy, off-white salad dressing that gets used as a sandwich spread, the cake has a subtle bit of extra brightness to the flavor. If one chooses to use a vegan mayonnaise, the result is tasty but lacking a little in structure; I would bake this in a square pan and frost and serve from the pan.
       
      The cocoa you use will also affect the flavor.  For a classic, homey flavor use a supermarket brand of cocoa. To add a little sophistication, use better, artisan type cocoa and use chocolate extract instead of the vanilla extract.
       
      Supposedly, the traditional frosting for this cake should have a caramel flavor. Look for one where you actually caramelize some sugar first. Modern recipes for the icing seem like weak imitations to me; using brown sugar as the main flavor instead of true caramel.
       
      Chocolate Mayonnaise or Salad Dressing Cake
      makes enough for two 8" round pans, or a 9" square (about 7 cups of batter)
       
      2 ounces/56g unsweetened, non-alkalized cocoa
      1 cup/236g boiling water
      1 teaspoon/4g regular strength vanilla extract
      3/4 cup/162g mayonnaise, vegan mayonnaise, or salad dressing (the tangy, off-white, sandwich spread type dressing)
      10.5ounces/300g all-purpose flour
      7 ounces/200g sugar
      0.35ounce/10g baking soda
       
      Preheat your oven to 350°.
      Grease or spray two 8" round pans or an equivalent volume square or rectangle.
      Place the cocoa in a medium (4-5 cup) bowl. Add the hot water and stir with a fork to break up any clumps. Allow to cool down a little,  then add the vanilla extract and the mayonnaise or salad dressing spread. Beat well to eliminate lumps. In the bowl of an electric mixer or larger regular bowl if making by hand, sift in the flour and add the sugar and baking soda. Mix the dry ingredients to distribute evenly. Slowly beat in the cocoa mixture. Mix until the batter has an even color. Pour immediately into the pans. If making two 8" rounds, weigh them to ensure they contain equal amounts.
      Bake for approximately 20 minutes, or until the center of the top springs back when touched lightly. (The toothpick test does NOT work well on this moist cake!) Allow the cake to cool a little and shrink from the sides of the pan before removing. Removal is easier while still a little warm.
      Good with or without frosting.
      Good beginner cake for kids to make.
       
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...