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Too strong onions


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More often than not I find these aren't all that sweet. Any comments, recommendations? Thanks

"Last week Uncle Vinnie came over from Sicily and we took him to the Olive Garden. The next day the family car exploded."

--Nick DePaolo

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More often than not I find these aren't all that sweet. Any comments, recommendations? Thanks

Cooked or raw ?

edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

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Raw.

Sorry then, I don't know. I know sweet onions are not as sweet cooked as 'regular' onions are when cooked and thought that might be what's going on.

edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

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Thanks. But aren't the so-called sweet onions supposed to eliminate the need for that?

"Last week Uncle Vinnie came over from Sicily and we took him to the Olive Garden. The next day the family car exploded."

--Nick DePaolo

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Don't onions get stronger as they age? Where are you getting your onions from? It could be that they're older or being stored improperly. If you get stuck with a sharp one, soak thin slices in ice water for ten minutes or so, it'll leach out the bite.

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Nakji, I think that's it. This afternoon the local produce manager told me when the get soft at the top they lose their sweetness.

"Last week Uncle Vinnie came over from Sicily and we took him to the Olive Garden. The next day the family car exploded."

--Nick DePaolo

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Is it my imagination or were Vidalias sweeter when they first appeared on the national market, and as they became more popular, they've probably been overproduced, and now less different from ordinary Spanish onions than they used to be? The same seems to be true for Clementines as well.

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Thanks, all. I guess I might as well just buy Spanish or red onions if I'm gonna soak 'em.

"Last week Uncle Vinnie came over from Sicily and we took him to the Olive Garden. The next day the family car exploded."

--Nick DePaolo

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Is it my imagination or were Vidalias sweeter when they first appeared on the national market, and as they became more popular, they've probably been overproduced, and now less different from ordinary Spanish onions than they used to be? The same seems to be true for Clementines as well.

I don't think it is your imagination. It is storage. They developed a method to store them a few years ago and I bet what the rest of the country gets are older versions. Still taste sweet here locally and we are lucky enough to get the Spring "green" versions which are delicious.

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My mom uses the hot water method for de-heating onions. She puts a medium size sauce pan of water to boil then pours the hot water over the onions in a sieve. I use either the hot water method, cold water soak or vinegar soak depending on what dish the onions are going in to.

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