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I have this pan and I really want to use it .....


EllenC
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... but every time I try to bake a cake or brownies in it they won't release. I've used pan spray and Bakers Joy and brushing melted butter and brushing oil in the crevases but nothing works. How can I make this work?

I've also thought about making fudge and then putting it in the pan, but I don't want to waste a batch of fudge if I will have the same problem.

Here is a link to the pan in case you want to look at it: Bundt Pan

Totally cute pan, but not very useful right now. Unless of course I want to make trifle with a massive infusion of frustration!

Thanks,

Ellen

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I know how troublesome these pans can be.

You can grease and flour the pan, or much easier, make "baker's grease".

Simply mix together, 1 cup of flour, 1 cup of shortening, and then add in

1 cup of oil and mix til fluffy. Use a pastry brush to apply to your pan.

Store your unused bakers grease in the fridge.

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I have pretty good luck with these type of pans by either spraying with pan spray or using the bakers grease, after baking, I cool the cakes, then freeze them solid. Then I turn the pan upside down and use a propane torch to heat up the bottom of the pan a little. They will usually release nicely.

check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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I don't own the pan, but have seen it.

Some brownie recipes tend to stick a lot. I have some that call for wax paper to be placed in the pan prior to baking, because traditional release agents don't work.

Of the commercial sprays, Vegaline works pretty well.

I generally use the release mixture (1/2 cup lecithin granules, 1 cup of oil, blended until smooth) from the Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book. It's less convenient because it has to be painted on, but it seems to always work.

Brownies also have a disadvantage for use in this type of pan because they develop a crusty exterior while keeping a soft, crumbly exterior that doesn't stay together well. I'd say that the pan is better suited for a soft cake, and possibly molding chocolates.

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I have the pan too and I've never used it. I really want to though!!

I also have this pan, and have never used it.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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If you add liquid lecithin to the baker's grease, it will make it even more release-friendly. But some pans seem to be bad for sticking. We have Wilton brownie pans which no matter how much we grease, still stick. On the other hand, I bought a Wilton mini-muffin tin with what looks like the same finish, which releases just fine.

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I don't own the pan, but have seen it.

Some brownie recipes tend to stick a lot. I have some that call for wax paper to be placed in the pan prior to baking, because traditional release agents don't work.

Of the commercial sprays, Vegaline works pretty well.

I generally use the release mixture (1/2 cup lecithin granules, 1 cup of oil, blended until smooth) from the Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book. It's less convenient because it has to be painted on, but it seems to always work.

Brownies also have a disadvantage for use in this type of pan because they develop a crusty exterior while keeping a soft, crumbly exterior that doesn't stay together well. I'd say that the pan is better suited for a soft cake, and possibly molding chocolates.

I have this pan, too. One of the reasons it hasn't been used yet: calculating how much batter to put in those petite cups. :huh:

I agree with Lisa that cake (rich, fine-grained, not too sugary) is far more suited to this pan than brownies; maybe I'll try Dorie's Coconut Tea Cake in the pan.

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My first, and only, attempt to use a Bundt type pan ended up with my giving the cake to my neighbor who has young and uncomplaining kids, who are the recipients of everything I do which cannot be served to a grown-up audience.

The cake had a sugary streuseley topping...all of which stuck to the pan...forever almost. Who knew? Not me. :raz:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Brownies also have a disadvantage for use in this type of pan because they develop a crusty exterior while keeping a soft, crumbly exterior that doesn't stay together well. I'd say that the pan is better suited for a soft cake, and possibly molding chocolates.

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Brownies also have a disadvantage for use in this type of pan because they develop a crusty exterior while keeping a soft, crumbly exterior that doesn't stay together well. I'd say that the pan is better suited for a soft cake, and possibly molding chocolates.

If you mold chocolates in this pan, won't they be difficult to get out? Or will they pop out after they have been chilled?

Properly tempered chocolate will contract as it cools and should pop out quite nicely. Sometimes you have to give it a tap - which might be difficult with a pan this big and heavy.

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One of the very streuselly Bundt coffee cake recipes I have advises: "Slather on the shortening or oil very liberally - the way you would sunscreen on your shoulders." :laugh:

Would that I had had that recipe at the time. I did follow the instructions given. It said nothing about sunscreen :sad: . It was a wonderful tasting cake, with cardamom...my favorite in the world...well, I have lots of favorites :laugh: . Perhaps I'll try it again. Today. :smile:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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So over the weekend, I thought I would try all the ideas. I decided to make hjshorter's Sour Cream Spice Cake. It is delicious and very light. I usually make it in a bundt pan so I figured it might work for this application. I whipped up a batch of Annie's pan grease. I used a pastry brush to slather it on the pan like sun screen. (Maybe I'm not using enough sun screen?) I filled the holes too full. Then I baked it. Four little cakes came out of the pan. Even after banging it on the counter, nothing else released. Fortunately, I have a 21 year old son who is ready, willing and able to pluck the little failures out of the pan and pop them in his mouth.

I have some Peter's milk chocolate. Maybe this weekend I will try that. What a bummer. It's a lovely pan...

Ellen

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I used a pastry brush to slather it on the pan like sun screen. (Maybe I'm not using enough sun screen?)

FWIW, most people don't apply enough sunscreen--suggested amount it 1-2 ounces (that's 1/8 to 1/4 of most bottles). Try using more of the goo and see what happens.

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I have pretty good luck with these type of pans by either spraying with pan spray or using the bakers grease, after baking, I cool the cakes, then freeze them solid. Then I turn the pan upside down and use a propane torch to heat up the bottom of the pan a little. They will usually release nicely.

pastrymama's suggestion is really a good one. That's what really works a lot of the time. The cooling gives them time to contract and loosen. Freezing makes them nice and hard, and the propane torch warms the grease to let them just pop out.

This is how I release my pineapple upside down cakes. Bake, then refrigerate in the pan, then turn the pan upside down and heat it with the torch. It comes out perfectly.

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I have pretty good luck with these type of pans by either spraying with pan spray or using the bakers grease, after baking, I cool the cakes, then freeze them solid. Then I turn the pan upside down and use a propane torch to heat up the bottom of the pan a little. They will usually release nicely.

pastrymama's suggestion is really a good one. That's what really works a lot of the time. The cooling gives them time to contract and loosen. Freezing makes them nice and hard, and the propane torch warms the grease to let them just pop out.

This is how I release my pineapple upside down cakes. Bake, then refrigerate in the pan, then turn the pan upside down and heat it with the torch. It comes out perfectly.

Brilliant! So I will try again. :smile:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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  • 2 weeks later...

I thought I would update those of you who have or may want this pan. I emailed Nordicware and they sent me a lovely email in reply:

"Ellen, I'm sorry you're having so much trouble with the teacake pan! If you have ever used regular cooking spray to grease it, though, that could possibly be the culprit. Cooking spray can leave an almost-invisible residue that makes for a sticking problem on subsequent use. Try giving the pan a good (1/2 hour or so) soaking in really, really hot, soapy water, and then a good scrubbing with a textured scrubber (not steel wool, though!), or a brush. Then try baking again to see if it makes a difference. Let us know if you still have problems after that. For good measure, below I will include some detailed information for getting the best results with our fancy baking pans.Good luck, and keep us posted!"

Apparently Lecithin in spary oil can create a film on the pans. So I put some Dawn dish detergent in the pan and filled the sink with the hottest water I can get out of my tap. I left it to soak overnight because I was tired. The next day I washed it out, rinced and dried well. Then I made a box cake mix because I hate using up really good ingredients on crumbles that just end up in the vacuum that is my son. (I want him to only get the good ingredients when they look good apparently.)

The cake was chocolate. They came out of the pan perfectly. I cooled them for five minutes and they popped right out. I think next time, I will use a pastry bag to fill them so the details are more crisp. It is very important to avoid air bubbles to get a good look to the finished product. Oh yeah, I sprayed them with Bakers Joy®.

I filled them about 2/3 full. That makes them rise to just the right height. They are the perfect size for one bite. Cakes that are dusted with powdered sugar are best so you can see the details.

I have pictures if someone wants to see them.

Thanks for all your great suggestions.

Ellen

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I thought I would update those of you who have or may want this pan. I emailed Nordicware and they sent me a lovely email in reply:

"Ellen, I'm sorry you're having so much trouble with the teacake pan! If you have ever used regular cooking spray to grease it, though, that could possibly be the culprit. Cooking spray can leave an almost-invisible residue that makes for a sticking problem on subsequent use. Try giving the pan a good (1/2 hour or so) soaking in really, really hot, soapy water, and then a good scrubbing with a textured scrubber (not steel wool, though!), or a brush. Then try baking again to see if it makes a difference. Let us know if you still have problems after that. For good measure, below I will include some detailed information for getting the best results with our fancy baking pans.Good luck, and keep us posted!"

Apparently Lecithin in spary oil can create a film on the pans. So I put some Dawn dish detergent in the pan and filled the sink with the hottest water I can get out of my tap. I left it to soak overnight because I was tired. The next day I washed it out, rinced and dried well. Then I made a box cake mix because I hate using up really good ingredients on crumbles that just end up in the vacuum that is my son. (I want him to only get the good ingredients when they look good apparently.)

Thanks for all your great suggestions.

Ellen

Thanks for posting this! I have some non-stick pans that have recently begun sticking and I do use cooking spray in them sometimes so it's good to know this can possibly be fixed.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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