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Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook by Fuchsia Dunlop

55 posts in this topic

That looks beautiful Bruce. I'll have to keep that cabbage dish in mind - love cabbage!

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Thumbs up to both the Farmhouse Pork and Qing Qing's Back in the Pot Pork. The latter was particularly delicious -- the pork belly rendered so much fat that it was almost deep frying in its own fat.

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The Cumin Beef is one of the most delicious things I've eaten recently.

Fuchsia's new book Every Grain of Rice: Simple Chinese Home Cooking was released in the UK recently.

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