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Gluten-Free Bread

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We're working on gluten free breads to satisfy growing requests for GF products. We've developed good tasting recipes for white, rosemary, and multigrain. The problem we're having has to do with the dryness of the crumb (it almost powders in the mouth). We add about 1TBS veg oil for each loaf, but that doesn't seem to help. All the recipes have either whole eggs or egg whites, and butter. Our dough base is sorghum flour, potato starch, and tapioca flour, with a small proportion of Expandex.

Any thoughts on how we might be able to add and retain moisture in the crumb for a better mouth feel?

Cheers,

Steve

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Zoe Francois has a new book that just came out which has a chapter on gluten-free breads. Members have had great success with her first book here so I definitely think it would be worth looking at for ideas.


Edited by CanadianBakin' (log)

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We're working on gluten free breads to satisfy growing requests for GF products. ... We add about 1TBS veg oil for each loaf, but that doesn't seem to help. All the recipes have either whole eggs or egg whites, and butter. Our dough base is sorghum flour, potato starch, and tapioca flour, with a small proportion of Expandex.

Any thoughts on how we might be able to add and retain moisture in the crumb for a better mouth feel?

Moisture retention is supposed to be one of the benefits of using Expandex - the proprietary ingredient you mention.

However, its manufacturers seem to expect it to be used as near 50% of the flour in white GF bread.

http://expandexglutenfree.com/consumers/recipes.php

And they suggest using it to reduce (not eliminate) the usual GF gums (not mentioned by the OP).

Using previously-scalded (and cooled) milk as some of the liquid might help, as would some Lecithin (without the other egg-ey components).

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Greetings, all. I'm desirous of baking gluten-free breads for sale at Farmer's Markets, as about 40% of the people who won't take a sample of my bread for sale ask if I have any gluten-free samples. I give! I found what seemed like a fabulous recipe in Wayne Gisslen's Professional Baking, 5th Ed., with a gorgeous photo of a fully risen and "oven burst" loaf, baked in a standard sized baking pan, sliced to show the lovely, bright-white interior of rice and other gluten-free flours, and golden crust. Yeah, right. I baked the recipe as written, and came out with a flabby, wet dough that was so unstructured that it rose and spilled over the top of the bread pan, and sunk miserably upon cooling. Here's a photo to laugh at!

I tried making a "slash" by running a skewer along the length of the pudding . . . hmmmm.

So, does anyone have any recipes to share? I haven't found a gluten-free posting on Egullet, although I have to think someone has introduced the subject. Thanks!

GlutFreeSlice.jpg

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are you looking for standard white loaves or whole grain type gluten free breads? if you plan to sell these as gluten free, you'll need to keep a separate baking area and separate set of pans and utensils for gluten free baking. cross contamination with non gluten free ingredients can cause huge problems for gluten sensitive individuals.

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Try baking without slashing and see what happens.

Greetings, all. I'm desirous of baking gluten-free breads for sale at Farmer's Markets, as about 40% of the people who won't take a sample of my bread for sale ask if I have any gluten-free samples. I give! I found what seemed like a fabulous recipe in Wayne Gisslen's Professional Baking, 5th Ed., with a gorgeous photo of a fully risen and "oven burst" loaf, baked in a standard sized baking pan, sliced to show the lovely, bright-white interior of rice and other gluten-free flours, and golden crust. Yeah, right. I baked the recipe as written, and came out with a flabby, wet dough that was so unstructured that it rose and spilled over the top of the bread pan, and sunk miserably upon cooling. Here's a photo to laugh at!

I tried making a "slash" by running a skewer along the length of the pudding . . . hmmmm.

So, does anyone have any recipes to share? I haven't found a gluten-free posting on Egullet, although I have to think someone has introduced the subject. Thanks!

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are you looking for standard white loaves or whole grain type gluten free breads? if you plan to sell these as gluten free, you'll need to keep a separate baking area and separate set of pans and utensils for gluten free baking. cross contamination with non gluten free ingredients can cause huge problems for gluten sensitive individuals.

Definitely agree with this statement. I've taken several master level classes in gluten free baking/bakery management and having everything separate including the air system (AC, Heating, etc.), storage, employee changing rooms, restrooms, and dishwashing is critical to the prevention of cross contamination.

There's a 100% gluten free bakery near me and I have spoken to the owners. They run a test which costs $30 on every single container of provisions they receive, like: sacks of rice flour, sacks of oats, sacks of sugar, tubs of baking powder, etc. Everything they buy is marked 'gluten free' but in reality, about 20% of the products arrive contaminated and must be returned. It's a constant battle for them, and they are in a major city (Phoenix) buying from major distributors.

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Thanks for the recommendations, all. Yes, I'm planning to use separate utensils, and certainly won't bake both types of breads at the same time. I won't have access to a separate baking area, however, and plan to warn my future customers that if they're extremely sensitive, they shouldn't buy my bread. But for those with a modicum of sensitivity, I believe my product will work. I cooked for a woman with extreme celiac disease for years, and developed a successful pie crust and pizza dough, but bread has eluded me, being that the rise is difficult to obtain. I plan to try the wet dough recipe again, but will maybe accept the fact that it won't rise as well as wheat dough, and certainly not look like the photo in the cookbook! What's your opinion of the photo, master-class graduate? Is it possible? I'd love to have a recipe, if you are willing. Thanks for your input!

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The texture of that bread 'failure' looks a lot better than the gluten free breads I've seen, the texture has always been crumbly and 'cakey'. How was it?

As for the top, if you hadn't tried to slash it I think it would have looked nicely rustic. I'd give it another go.

Also, if it's collapsing, then it's a sign it hasn't been cooked long enough. I was taught to push it as far as possible without burning it to avoid the collapse. It has to do with ensuring the crust is firm enough to hold the shape as it cools. From the colour of the bread in your photo versus the cookbook picturre, the bread could have been pushed a little further.

Hope that helps.


Edited by Broken English (log)

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PanaCana, I'd love the black bread recipe.

Liz, I'm a recently diagnosed celiac and am trying to learn to bake gluten free. I'm working my way through the Gluten Free Gourmet Bakes Bread book. I had some success with the crumpets recipe, and some of the quick breads have been pretty good; haven't hit a really, really good yeast loaf yet.

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I've pretty much given up gluten-free baking (for many, many reasons). I buy the Udi's bread for sandwiches and that's enough to tide me over.

Check out the gluten-free girl's blog and cookbooks. She seems to be having success doing gluten-free baking.

You should also join the silly-yaks list serve on yahoo. The celiacs on there have a number of books/ authors they recommend for first time gluten-free bakers. Again, no comment from me about the authors or quality of their baked goods.

Good luck! Gluten-free baking has to be the hardest thing to do successfully.

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Kay, the only question I have is this: do you have tapioca starch / fecula de yuca / almidon de yuca available to you? If not, any recipes I have for GF won't be do-able. Yuca behaves just like gluten in recipes (ie gives the bread a nice elasticity and helps achieve a good rise and texture) without any of the gluteny badness.

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Thanks for all the replies, everyone. I'm not tied to white at all, PanaCana, I'd love to see your recipe! It sounds great. And yes, tapioca and corn starch in this recipe, and the texture and flavor were good, Broken English. That part I was impressed with; it was just the final "ET" shape of the bread I was disappointed in! I'm trying it again, without the slash, and maybe not rising quite so much in the pan, so it doesn't spill over. I think the very wet dough is a benefit after all, after having tried it with less water, and getting non-risen GF bricks instead of bread. I'll post the recipe when I grab the big book at home tonight. It's a challenge!

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Liz, here are a couple of different recipes.

This first one, a yuca (manioc) only bun, is my go-to dinner roll when celiacs are visiting. These are best served warm, but stand reheating well (warm oven or nuker). It's a no-yeast bread, but you can make a yeast version by subbing in 1/4 oz of active dry for the baking powder and then allowing the bread a 20-30 minute developing rise before forming it (and a 10 minute proof before baking, of course). I like the baking powder version better, though. They have an intriguing texture, more like yeast breads than biscuits (which is technically what they are), an excellent flavour, and are very filling.

Pan de Yuca:

2.5 C yuca flour (that's tapioca flour by another name)

4 C grated cheese - mozzarella is traditional, but I really like medium cheddar

1 tsp baking powder

a pinch of finely ground salt

1 C butter, cut into small pieces

2 large eggs

1. Mix the yuca flour, cheese, baking powder, and salt together. I do this by hand, but apparently a food processor also works just fine.

2. Add the butter and eggs and knead until you've got a smooth dough (or process)

3. Preheat the oven to 500F (or as hot as she'll go - this recipe is original for wood-fired ovens)

4. Pinch off balls of about 2-3 oz each, roll them round, and set on your baking surface of choice (I use silpats)

5. Bake immediately, about 7 minutes, then about 3-5 more with the broiler on to golden them up.

6. Serve hot.

This dough also holds really well - I've made batches up to 3 days ahead and then simply fridged 'em with absolutely no ill effect. In non-mozza versions, I find it actually improves the flavour.

I'm going to have to go looking for the black bread recipe - it's one that uses a blend of flours, and I thought it was in the current binder but apparently not. :rolleyes:

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Here's the recipe from the misleading-picture cookbook:

Rice flour, 1 lb.

Potato starch, 3 oz.

Cornstarch, 2 oz.

Tapioca flour, 3 oz.

sugar, 1 oz.

nonfat milk solids or powdered milk, 2.5 oz.

xanthan gum, .5 oz.

salt, .5 oz.

instant yeast, .5 oz.

oil or butter melted, 2 oz.

water, warm, 1 lb. 12 oz.

white vinegar, .33 oz. or 2 tsp.

egg whites, lightly beaten, 6 oz.

total weight: 4 lb., 1 oz.

Sift all dry ingredients, mix on low speed to combine. Dusty!

Slowly add fat, water, and vinegar, and mix to combine.

Add egg whites, beat at high speed for 3 minutes to form batter.

Grease loaf pans and dust with rice flour, fill pans half full.

Proof until doubled, bake at 400 degrees for about 50 mins., depending on size of loaves.

I'd love to hear about someone else's results. The texture is not crumbly, and the flavor is good, but it's the rise that's missing! Thanks, all.

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That is similar to a gf white bread recipe that I use from King Arthur Flour. you might find that a pain de mie pan gives more reliable results. it helps form a very stable sturdy crust

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Thanks, Liztwozee. We are snowed in right now, but as soon as I can get supplies I'll make this. I appreciate your post.

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I like the idea of a Pullman pan; how does one use that -- with the cover on for rising and baking? How do you determine the perfect amount of dough, so it doesn't stress the pan when baking? As you can tell, I know nothing about the subject!

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Much to my chagrin, I recently was diagnosed with non-celiac gluten sensitivity. (And yes, it was based on actual lab work, not conjecture.) I've been buying gluten-free bread from Costco or a local health food store, but it leaves a lot to be desired -- and I'm not good at expectation-lowering.

 

Last week, at a favorite used book store in Chicago, I spotted Hertzberg and Francois's Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day. It looked worthwhile, and I already had their glutinous book, so I bought it. Before I start trying stuff out, does anyone have any comments, cautions, observations, etc. about the book?

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On 04/04/2017 at 11:39 AM, Alex said:

Much to my chagrin, I recently was diagnosed with non-celiac gluten sensitivity. (And yes, it was based on actual lab work, not conjecture.) I've been buying gluten-free bread from Costco or a local health food store, but it leaves a lot to be desired -- and I'm not good at expectation-lowering.

 

Last week, at a favorite used book store in Chicago, I spotted Hertzberg and Francois's Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day. It looked worthwhile, and I already had their glutinous book, so I bought it. Before I start trying stuff out, does anyone have any comments, cautions, observations, etc. about the book?

I haven't worked with it myself, but my daughter has just discovered that many of her chronic illnesses appear to be due to wheat or gluten (she's awaiting her appointment for testing/confirmation). 

 

I'm curious to know how you're getting on with it, and whether I should buy it for my daughter. 

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1 hour ago, chromedome said:

I haven't worked with it myself, but my daughter has just discovered that many of her chronic illnesses appear to be due to wheat or gluten (she's awaiting her appointment for testing/confirmation). 

 

I'm curious to know how you're getting on with it, and whether I should buy it for my daughter. 

 

Thanks for asking. The adjustment hasn't been as difficult as I anticipated, probably because when not on vacation we seldom eat out nowadays, and I do most of the cooking and all of the baking. I think that any concrete, noticable benefits will happen very gradually, though. I probably won't get to trying out the book until at least sometime in May, perhaps even later. I'll keep you posted. However, right now I'll PM you a great recipe for brownies that I developed.

 

The sensitivity was confirmed via a number of test results, but the primary one came via saliva testing, which revealed a marked IgA (immune) response to gliadin, a main component of gluten.

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