Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Jaymes

Pasta e Fagioli

Recommended Posts

My favorite version is this:

- put some olive oil in a pot

- add a clove of garlic

- add a sprig or two of rosemary

when you start to get a "the garlic is a cooking smell" throw in the cooked beans ( canned (already cooked) , dry, fresh, or frozen (to cook beforehand)

- add water and salt

- boil just a little bit

- pass all or most of the beans through a food mill

- put the bean mush in a pot (it should be a little liquidy because the pasta will absorb quite a bit of water)

- boil

. add dried spaghetti broken up into 2 inch size pieces

- cook for about 10 minutes

done.

(you can drizzle a little oil on the top if you like)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started this thread back in 2002. Ten years. Unbelievable.

To respond to somebody about the meat, I do use pancetta/proscuitto. I've found a domestic (US) version at Sam's/Costco that, while not as good as the real Italian stuff of course, also costs much, much less. I wouldn't use it to wrap a slice of juicy melon, but it's so affordable that we can put lots of it in this soup.

And it's spectacular.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's what I do:

. . .

Start with about as much good-quality, imported pancetta as you can afford. Try for at least ¼ pound. ½ pound is better. More than that is even more wonderful. If you've purchased it in a chunk, then chop it into medium-small dice. If you've bought slices, then julienne them. (Lately, I've been using a domestic brand that I buy at Costco/Sam's. It's not grand enough to just wrap around melon and serve, but cooked up in a soup, it's perfectly fine. And, it's affordable enough that I can use 1 pound, or even more.)

To respond to somebody about the meat, I do use pancetta/proscuitto. I've found a domestic (US) version at Sam's/Costco that, while not as good as the real Italian stuff of course, also costs much, much less. I wouldn't use it to wrap a slice of juicy melon, but it's so affordable that we can put lots of it in this soup.

I'm confused. Do you use pancetta or proscuitto, or does it matter? Your comments about "wrapping around melon" make me think of proscuitto, but in your instructions you referred to pancetta, which seems to me to be a more natural choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's what I do:

. . .

Start with about as much good-quality, imported pancetta as you can afford. Try for at least ¼ pound. ½ pound is better. More than that is even more wonderful. If you've purchased it in a chunk, then chop it into medium-small dice. If you've bought slices, then julienne them. (Lately, I've been using a domestic brand that I buy at Costco/Sam's. It's not grand enough to just wrap around melon and serve, but cooked up in a soup, it's perfectly fine. And, it's affordable enough that I can use 1 pound, or even more.)

To respond to somebody about the meat, I do use pancetta/proscuitto. I've found a domestic (US) version at Sam's/Costco that, while not as good as the real Italian stuff of course, also costs much, much less. I wouldn't use it to wrap a slice of juicy melon, but it's so affordable that we can put lots of it in this soup.

I'm confused. Do you use pancetta or proscuitto, or does it matter? Your comments about "wrapping around melon" make me think of proscuitto, but in your instructions you referred to pancetta, which seems to me to be a more natural choice.

Honestly, I like them both. Usually have used what I can find, or what is on sale. I've lived a lot of places where I can't get one or the other. It is a pretty boldly-flavored soup, so I don't find it critical to use one over the other. Either one beats beef, in our view.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night was my turn.  Some days ago I made up a pot of Rancho Gordo cranberry beans, pretty simple, with salt, sage, and olive oil.  Everything I had hoped but there was a lot left, and I wanted to make Pasta e Fagioli with the leftovers.

 

Never having made Pasta e Fagioli in my life, I consulted the three Italian cookbooks that I have, I believe nine versions Pasta e Fagioli  from the NY Times, and several other recipes online.  I had in mind just beans and pasta, but most authors seem to call for tomatoes in some way or fashion.  With all the diversity I realized I was pretty much on my own.

 

I prepared a tomato sauce of Pomi chopped tomatoes -- my favorite Italian brand -- which Cooks Illustrated detests because it contains neither salt nor citric acid.  I started with a chopped onion heated tenderly in olive oil for over half an hour without browning.  I added salt and a lot of sage.  (My sage plant still needed much more pruning.)

 

Then I added a portion of the tomato sauce to the beans, enough so that it looked right to me.  And some boxed organic chicken broth to thin it.  I boiled up some DeCecco orecchiette and plated (or maybe bowled) it with the sauce.

 

The flavor was excellent but the sauce was too thick.  It was more like pasta with cranberry bean sauce.  It was too heavy for my taste.  Next try I diluted the sauce pot with much more chicken broth (the rest of the box, to be honest).  And less than half as much orecchiette, cooked a little longer than before.  Pasta e Fagioli is not the time for al dente orecchiette.  At least in my experience.

 

This time perfection -- with parsley and parmesan and pepper.  And much soave.  I finished the whole pot, three or four large bowlsful...if sadly not the full 1.5 liter bottle.  An awful, awful lot of thujone and sage.  Fortunately (at least according to Wikipedia) ethanol protects from thujone intoxication.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thrilled to see this topic re-emerge. It's such a wonderful soup - one of the world's great classic dishes. 

 

While Houston definitely isn't digging out of a two-foot snowfall, it did get pretty cold (for Houston) and wet here, and I naturally thought of pasta y fagioli, so made up a nice big pot.

 

Pre-Rancho-Gordo, just used ordinary beans. Didn't think this delicious soup could get any better.  But now, of course, with his marvelous beans, it has.

 

  • Like 4

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By haresfur
      I found this article about arancino/arancina really interesting
       

    • By jennyandthejets
      I'll be in Naples for a few days next month and I wanted to try something traditional, and my friend recommended trying parmigiana. She said she loved it, but the problem is that she ate it at her Italian friend's house, and I won't be able to have that exact parmigiana. So, I did some research online and found a few restaurants that have good ratings and are serving allegedly great eggplant casserole. This place is 4 stars rated, but people seem not to agree whether the parmigiana is good or not.... On the other hand, this place has a great rating, appears when searching for the parmigiana, but nobody seems to write about it in their reviews. Finally, this one is said to have the best parmigiana in Naples (or in the world, for that matter), and I wanted to know if anyone had the so-called world's best?
      I would really appreciate if you could help me make the decision. Looking forward to your advice!

    • By alacarte
      I recently took a trip to Northern Italy, and was delighted to find that the cappuccino everywhere was just wonderful, without exception. Smooth, flavorful, aromatic perfect crema, strong but not too strong.
      Aside from the obvious answer (duh, Italians created cappuccino ), what makes Italian capp so fantastic, and how do I duplicate the effect here?
      I'm wondering if it's the water, the way the coffee is ground or stored, the machines used....I'm baffled.
      Also noticed that the serving size tended to be smaller than what I'm used to -- i.e. a small teacupful vs. a brimming mug or Starbucks supersize. Not sure why that is either.
      Grazie mille for any insight on this!
    • By Modernist Cuisine Team
      The Modernist Cuisine team is currently traveling the globe to research pizza and different pizza styles for our next book Modernist Pizza.  Nathan and the team will be in São Paulo and Buenos Aires soon. We'd love hear from the eGullet community—what pizzerias should they visit while they're there? You can read more about our next book Modernist Pizza here. Thanks in advance, everyone! 
    • By scordelia
      My article was published (my first one!)! Hooray! And I do have some Florentine restaurant recommendations including the new Osteria del Pavone which is amazing--lampredotto ravioli is now a thing and it must be tried.
       
      http://www.classicchicagomagazine.com/florence-in-winter/
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...