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What is the single best restaurant in London?


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Hi guys,

I am going for a short trip to London in a few weeks and I am trying to decide on which restaurant to visit. We are staying in Central London and would like it to be near by. Any advice is much appreciated.

Thanks,

ElisG.

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this is going to be a big one!

my vote would go to Le Gavroche. its got history, atmosphere, its in a lovely area, the lunch menu blasts other value for money claims out the water (with arbutus knocking on its door with its pre theatre dinner) the food is the kind of food you could eat again and again and still want to go back.

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How would you define "best"?

Michelin stars? A cuisine you particularly like? Value for money? Something else?

Best tasting food and overall experience. Obviously it will be very subjective.

We like pretty much every cuisine. And as it is a special occasion we aren't worried about price.

Thanks for the advice on Le Gavroche guys, the websites layout is a bit weird though. I don't understand how the menus are structured : :wacko:.

Thanks,

ElisG.

Edited by ElisG (log)
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You probably better not go to Le Gavroche, if you can't understand the menu layout :hmmm:

The first 3 pages are an example of the tasting menu including the accompanying wines. Then you've got starters, the meat and fish, then Cheese and Dessert

"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

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You probably better not go to Le Gavroche, if you can't understand the menu layout :hmmm:

The first 3 pages are an example of the tasting menu including the accompanying wines. Then you've got starters, the meat and fish, then Cheese and Dessert

Yes but there is nothing stating how you would order. I mean is it A la carte? Set menu? etc.

That's quite a snobby statement, because I don't understand a poorly laid out menu with no indication of pricing or how to order, I'm not entitled to visit the restaurant?

Edited by ElisG (log)
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The first 3 pages are the set menu, the rest is the a la carte. It is just an example menu.

I haven't seen a recent menu but as a guideline the last time I went for dinner, many years ago, starters ranged from £20 - £34, mains averaged around £35 each and desserts around £20 each. Dinner for two is unlikely to cost less than £300 including wine. The set lunch has a limited choice and costs £48 (I think) pounds including 1/2 a bottle of wine. The set menu is around £100 not including wine. If you are female you are unlikely to see a menu with the prices on, its that sort of place!

You're entitled to go to any restaurant you want if you are happy to pay and the restaurant is happy to have you.

"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

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The first 3 pages are the set menu, the rest is the a la carte. It is just an example menu.

I haven't seen a recent menu but as a guideline the last time I went for dinner, many years ago, starters ranged from £20 - £34, mains averaged around £35 each and desserts around £20 each. Dinner for two is unlikely to cost less than £300 including wine. The set lunch has a limited choice and costs £48 (I think) pounds including 1/2 a bottle of wine. The set menu is around £100 not including wine. If you are female you are unlikely to see a menu with the prices on, its that sort of place!

You're entitled to go to any restaurant you want if you are happy to pay and the restaurant is happy to have you.

Thanks for the info, because of the occasion we will ignore the price on the bill :P. Plus no-one in my family drinks thankfully, so we will save money on wine.

Any other suggestions?

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  • 2 weeks later...

You could always try this list (mods, please let me know if this is allowed or not, but it does seem relevant) - this will show you the best reviewed restaurants in the last 2-3 years:

http://www.hot-dinners.com/Restaurant-Reviews.html?order=rjr_overallrating

The caveat is - the more reviews, the more trustworthy the overall rating is. For instance, Murano, Corrigans & River Cafe have been well rated recently by lots of critics, while Indian Zing does well because of two recent stellar reviews.

Of course, if you're in town for the London Restaurant Festival (not sure when your trip is), there should be a few more options available to you (Tante Claire, the bus trips, London Eye).

Edited by gavinhanly (log)
Hot Dinners - London's Top restaurants, reviewed by the critics and you
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[

Thanks for the info, because of the occasion we will ignore the price on the bill :P. Plus no-one in my family drinks thankfully, so we will save money on wine.

Any other suggestions?

Yes - drink thankfully.

from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

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I concur with Le Gavroche at lunch as one of the best values in London. In my experience, if your dining companion is even remotely attractive you'll be treated remotely well and she will depart in a slight puddle and may even make remarks of undying fealty.

Although for the recently-furlonged American tourist, I should think that Gavins at Windows offers another purview of all the crooks and nannies that pepper London, beginning with the delivery entrance of The Connaught, punctuated with several declaratve steeples, then ending on the vast wastrel of The City.

At dinner, Arbutus - 17.50 pre- and post-theatre menus are very good values, so good, in fact that my chilly Scottish heart was warmed by a gorgeously braised shin of beef. Equally, Racine, on the Brompton Road promises a modicum of value and delicious bistro cooking. Mainly due to the subterranean kitchen, the servers enjoy unusually shapely calves.

Cheers,

J.

Edited by jamiemaw (log)

from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

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For a casual but great food experience (ie English Food), I recommend St. John's Bread and Wine. Although the food is simple, it is always very seasonal and comforting.

For the fine dining experience, I will go for Marcus Wareing at the Berkeley Hotel. I heard there's a chef in the kitchen reinventing the menu along side Marcus Wareing. The chef is heard to be from a strong resume including Thomas Keller's per se in New York and Rene Redzepi's Noma in Copenhagen.

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