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Hatch Chili Peppers (Merged Topic)


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6 hours ago, liuzhou said:

That confused me. I had to Google adovada. At first I thought it was a dyslexic avocado. But I know zilch about Mexican food, New or regular.

 

LOL.  The other distinction to be made is that there are plenty of differences between what we know as Mexican food and New Mexican food.  Not selling Mexico short, but humans have been living (and eating, evidently) in New Mexico for like 13,000 years).

 

6 hours ago, Chimayo Joe said:


Been to Mary & Tito's many times.  It's been several years since I've been to Albuquerque.  Mary & Tito's would be my first stop when I get back there.

 

We were having a nice discussion about Mary & Tito's last night. As well as Monroe's, Duran Pharmacy, Los Cuates, El Pinto, and of course, The Frontier! (And Blake's Lotta Burger, where you can't forget the green chile and cheese on your burger!).

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3 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

LOL.  The other distinction to be made is that there are plenty of differences between what we know as Mexican food and New Mexican food.  Not selling Mexico short, but humans have been living (and eating, evidently) in New Mexico for like 13,000 years).

 

 

We were having a nice discussion about Mary & Tito's last night. As well as Monroe's, Duran Pharmacy, Los Cuates, El Pinto, and of course, The Frontier! (And Blake's Lotta Burger, where you can't forget the green chile and cheese on your burger!).

Duran Pharmacy! We used to go for breakfast. That was in the late sixties, about 13,000 years ago.

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5 hours ago, weinoo said:

And Blake's Lotta Burger, where you can't forget the green chile and cheese on your burger!).

 

Blake's is an institution around here. People who leave NM will come back just to get one. A friend in town from Tennessee this week is lamenting that he has to leave Blake's again. And rumor has it that one of our 'alumni' living in Rochester, NY will have her parents bring her green chile burgers on the plane when they go to visit.

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This one?

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/12/carne-adovada-adobada-chili-braised-pork-recipe.html

 

it looks like it would taste great but I wouldn't call that New Mexican carne adovada.  Strange ingredients for New Mexican cooking which tends to be very simple.

 

This recipe is what New Mexican carne adovada is:

 

https://www.realfoodtraveler.com/carne-adovada-recipe-from-rancho-de-chimayo/

 

 

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22 hours ago, KennethT said:

What's your recipe for adovada?

 

1 hour ago, kayb said:

Carne adovado sent me to Google. Is the Serious Eats recipe a good one?

 

So what I did was research a bunch of recipes on line, look at a bunch of recipes in my cookbooks, and talk to some real cooks in my family; some cooks even from New Mexico.

 

First, using the dried red chili pods I got from Hatch, NM (via Amazon, KY) I made the above pictured red chile sauce. People, including my wife, have made that type of sauce with chili powder, using the powder in lieu of whole peppers. The sauce itself is fairly simple, with minimal additional ingredients; some onion, some garlic, some Mexican oregano and maybe honey, maybe not - you know the drill, everyone has their own way to make it. some people roast these dried chili peppers before making the sauce; others don't. The chilis are simmered, puréed, and then fried along with the additional ingredients. The resulting sauce is fucking delicious. And it can be used for many things, one of which is carne adovada. I mixed some in while reheating beans - they were great. Eggs, burgers, potatoes - you name it, they put chile sauces on it. (Oh, today I also communicated directly with people in Hatch, as I wanted to find out more about the process the chilis are put through before I buy them).

 

Okay, we have the sauce. Next, I did much of the same research for the adovada. I used good pork (Korubuta) shoulder, cut into 2" hunks. Browned it slightly (you'll see) and removed; cooked some onions and garlic and then added spices (such as cumin, coriander, oregano) to the pan, added pork back in along with a T of honey and vinegar, the red chili sauce and a little stock for the braise, and braised the meat for about 2 1/4 hours till it was almost fork tender. Then I finished it, with the lid slightly ajar, till the meat was fork tender and the sauce nice and thick. Others braise in the oven, I did mine on the stove top. Basically, I bastardized a number of recipes. To make this:

 

182512341_CarneAdovada10-14.thumb.jpeg.3db9f0709d86b15d6add29c1c4c8ab26.jpeg

 

Let's jsut say - it was delicious. We enjoyed it with tortillas, rice, and a sauté of corn. Tonight, we're having more.

 

Serious Eats' recipe:  https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/12/carne-adovada-adobada-chili-braised-pork-recipe.html

 

Cook's Illustrated - behind their ridiculous pay wall, but in the October, 2018 issue.

 

Zestful Kitchen - this recipe certainly looks fine.

 

No shortage of recipes. But, and it's a big but, the real deal is made with chilis (any of a number of varieties - like 8 or 10) specifically grown in the area of Hatch, NM. The Hatch Valley, as it were - sort of like Gilroy and garlic, if you know what I mean.

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33 minutes ago, Chimayo Joe said:

This recipe is what New Mexican carne adovada is:

 

https://www.realfoodtraveler.com/carne-adovada-recipe-from-rancho-de-chimayo/

 

Yeah, that's pretty much it. Well, except for the garlic salt, which I save for my Hidden Valley Ranch dressing. And pizza.

 

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1 hour ago, weinoo said:

 

 

So what I did was research a bunch of recipes on line, look at a bunch of recipes in my cookbooks, and talk to some real cooks in my family; some cooks even from New Mexico.

 

First, using the dried red chili pods I got from Hatch, NM (via Amazon, KY) I made the above pictured red chile sauce. People, including my wife, have made that type of sauce with chili powder, using the powder in lieu of whole peppers. The sauce itself is fairly simple, with minimal additional ingredients; some onion, some garlic, some Mexican oregano and maybe honey, maybe not - you know the drill, everyone has their own way to make it. some people roast these dried chili peppers before making the sauce; others don't. The chilis are simmered, puréed, and then fried along with the additional ingredients. The resulting sauce is fucking delicious. And it can be used for many things, one of which is carne adovada. I mixed some in while reheating beans - they were great. Eggs, burgers, potatoes - you name it, they put chile sauces on it. (Oh, today I also communicated directly with people in Hatch, as I wanted to find out more about the process the chilis are put through before I buy them).

 

Okay, we have the sauce. Next, I did much of the same research for the adovada. I used good pork (Korubuta) shoulder, cut into 2" hunks. Browned it slightly (you'll see) and removed; cooked some onions and garlic and then added spices (such as cumin, coriander, oregano) to the pan, added pork back in along with a T of honey and vinegar, the red chili sauce and a little stock for the braise, and braised the meat for about 2 1/4 hours till it was almost fork tender. Then I finished it, with the lid slightly ajar, till the meat was fork tender and the sauce nice and thick. Others braise in the oven, I did mine on the stove top. Basically, I bastardized a number of recipes. To make this:

 

182512341_CarneAdovada10-14.thumb.jpeg.3db9f0709d86b15d6add29c1c4c8ab26.jpeg

 

Let's jsut say - it was delicious. We enjoyed it with tortillas, rice, and a sauté of corn. Tonight, we're having more.

 

Serious Eats' recipe:  https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/12/carne-adovada-adobada-chili-braised-pork-recipe.html

 

Cook's Illustrated - behind their ridiculous pay wall, but in the October, 2018 issue.

 

Zestful Kitchen - this recipe certainly looks fine.

 

No shortage of recipes. But, and it's a big but, the real deal is made with chilis (any of a number of varieties - like 8 or 10) specifically grown in the area of Hatch, NM. The Hatch Valley, as it were - sort of like Gilroy and garlic, if you know what I mean.


You know what you're doing.  That looks great.

 

Here's another recipe with youtube video. No garlic salt.  Similar to your ingredients except it used ground chile instead of pods. 
 

https://santafeschoolofcooking.com/Recipes/Archived_Recipes/Carne_Adovada/

 

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10 hours ago, Chimayo Joe said:


You know what you're doing.  That looks great.

 

Here's another recipe with youtube video. No garlic salt.  Similar to your ingredients except it used ground chile instead of pods. 
 

https://santafeschoolofcooking.com/Recipes/Archived_Recipes/Carne_Adovada/

 

 

Yes - I definitely looked at that one.  One of my former teachers at Peter Kump's lives in Santa Fe now, and appears to cook at the SFSC. And this is one of the cookbooks I perused...

 

IMG_2575.thumb.JPG.273874299aeafe4de4fe6d5b10b10f1b.JPG

 

Purchased at the Coyote Cafe!  But, did you know that Miller has tomatoes in his red chile sauce? A shonda!

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  • 8 months later...

Anyone have a preferred mail order source? We’ve been eating a lot of chili verde recently and I want to try with fresh home roasted peppers. I also want an excuse to play with my grill. 😄

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10 minutes ago, quiet1 said:

Anyone have a preferred mail order source? We’ve been eating a lot of chili verde recently and I want to try with fresh home roasted peppers. I also want an excuse to play with my grill. 😄

 

The Hatch Chile Store is a good resource...

 

https://www.hatch-green-chile.com/collections/dried-red-chile-pods

 

For fresh hatch chiles, you might have to wait a bit, but they are taking preorders...

 

https://www.hatch-green-chile.com/collections/fresh-hatch-green-chile

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  • 1 month later...

I bought some at Krogers over the weekend. Roasted in the Ninja Foodi and then peeled. They will be going into green chile cheeseburgers.

 

I did see a case of them, the label on the case said, "Hot House Grown". I bought them anyway and they smelled delicious when I roasted them, not sure why they would need a hot house if they are gown in New Mexico. 

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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1 hour ago, chileheadmike said:

I bought some at Krogers over the weekend. Roasted in the Ninja Foodi and then peeled. They will be going into green chile cheeseburgers.

 

I did see a case of them, the label on the case said, "Hot House Grown". I bought them anyway and they smelled delicious when I roasted them, not sure why they would need a hot house if they are gown in New Mexico. 

I think cuz still seasonal outdoors, plus can control, heat, humidity, pests, and water

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Probably because the plants are started in greenhouse for a jump-start for harvest.  Then transplanted outside when hardened up.   There was deep drought (failed Monsoon and winter rains 2019-2020)  up until the last 2 months and now the SW Monsoon is practically biblical with moisture now.  Hallelujah!

Also, earlier harvest so fresh chiles in mid-Summer benefit.

 

https://www.lcsun-news.com/story/news/2021/07/22/chile-harvest-starts-early-some-new-mexico-farmers/8054285002/

 

 

"Instead of starting from seed, more farmers are planting seedlings that have sprouted in a greenhouse to get their fields going faster. For some, it's a hedge against increasing labor costs, while others see the method as a way to save water as climate change adds to the uncertainty of irrigation supplies with every passing growing season."

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My daughter lives in Albuquerque..  we always love to go to the Corrales area.  We usually fill up with fresh when season is on..  the farmers market there  sells a green chili burrito..  that is steller.

 

If u travel to Santa Fe--  get up to Rancho Chimayo   some of the best NM  food around

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Its good to have Morels

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  • 3 weeks later...

I just ordered HatchGreenChilis a few minutes ago. An annual tradition. Tomatillos are about to form up in the garden. A wild patch in the back. Smoked hatch tomatillo salsa for the winter months. My best home grown are the tiny Peruvian Ahi Amarillo. Not much luck with others in my climate. An Ahi plant I can bring indoors and will continue to produce fruit throughout the holidays. 

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3 hours ago, Annie_H said:

I just ordered HatchGreenChilis a few minutes ago. An annual tradition. Tomatillos are about to form up in the garden. A wild patch in the back. Smoked hatch tomatillo salsa for the winter months. My best home grown are the tiny Peruvian Ahi Amarillo. Not much luck with others in my climate. An Ahi plant I can bring indoors and will continue to produce fruit throughout the holidays. 

I usually order those, too.  I told my husband I was going to skip this year because I still have a couple packs in the freezer....but I am really wanting some fresh ones....

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When they are delivered I panic about processing...lol. But they keep for a few weeks being so fresh. I freeze some whole, but most get roasted/smoked. I used my last zip-lock gallon bag in the Spring....roasted/smoked with garlic and onions...

We are not entertaining as much as pre-covid....but I will go ahead and make my smoked tomatillo salsa as always and deliver to friends and family. It does freeze fine.

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24 minutes ago, Annie_H said:

When they are delivered I panic about processing.

That's the main thing stopping me.  I have a lot on my plate right now.  I know I can buy them already roasted and peeled but the fresh are sooooooo good.

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