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Hatch Chili Peppers (Merged Topic)

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I was driving all over Denver today looking for Aleppo pepper. I finally find it at a retail Penzey's, but not before being bombarded from road signs for "Roasted Hatch Chili Peppers", $18.99/lb.

For that price, I figured, must be something special.

They smell fantastic, but...

What do I use them for? If they're as popular as they seem, surely they have some authentic use?

Help! Else, I make into salsa or bread.

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Yikes! They are 99 cents/lb here green and $2.79/lb roasted at Central Market in the Dallas - Ft. Worth area. You might be able to get them to ship it to you for less than that bargain $18.99/lb.

Hatch Mac n' Cheese

Green Salsa

Red Salsa

Hatch Chile Jam

Hatch Dip for chips or veggies

Hatch Chilies Stuffed with Chicken and Cheese

Whatever you can do with other chilies, you can do it with Hatch chilies

Have fun!

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Whatever you can do with other chilies, you can do it with Hatch chilies

Have fun!

Oh, these are just great ideas, Richard. Thank you!

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A cautionary note: Hatch chilies come hot and mild here. THe mild ones are indeed rather mild and are great for stuffing or simply if your heat tolerance is low, since the hot ones are more seriously hot. Hot or mild, they have great flavor.

And they are great in bread.

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Green chile cheese souffle. I can't make enough of these this time of year.

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Rob (aka gfron1) did a multi-course dinner about a year ago that was themed around those chiles. He's in New Mexico which is a long way from where I live in Canada so I wasn't at the dinner but it looked and sounded tasty. He posted pics and descriptions on his blog. If I'm not mistaken, it was late august or early september of '08 if you're interested in digging it up.

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You can clean them, removes seeds and stems, and freeze them for later.

Some things to try:

Posole

Green Chile Stew

Green Chile Enchilada Sauce

And, my personal favorite, put them on a regular red-sauce and mozzarella pizza! I freeze some in small bags every year, just for pizza fixings.

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I was driving all over Denver today looking for Aleppo pepper. I finally find it at a retail Penzey's, but not before being bombarded from road signs for "Roasted Hatch Chili Peppers", $18.99/lb.

You may be mis- reading the signs...They are usually sold by the bushel.There are lots of places out on W. 44th and on S. Federal that will roast em for you.in any quanity...

Bud

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I am sure the signs should read $18.99 for a bushel of unroasted chiles. They have gas-fired hooppers to roast the chiles on the spot. Pork and green chile stew, posole, and green chile cheeseburgers are all super options.

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Today I noticed with great delight that the big cases if hatch chiles are back. They will roast them for you in the big drum roasters outside for free with the purchase of a case (23.99 here).

After two hours cleaning and seeding, my hands are on fire (what a dope), but I've got about 15 one pound bags, and can't wait to start cooking with them.

Here's some pictures:

a6cd0823-a7f5-1c1b.jpg

a6cd0823-a811-f353.jpg

a6cd0823-a82c-c98e.jpg

a6cd0823-a852-394f.jpg

And this is the 'juice' left in the bottom of the bag from the chiles after roasting, I think it'll be a good lube (in place of water) when I start blending these for green sauce:

a6cd0823-a868-c2ba.jpg

---

- From iPhone using Tapatalk

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Wonderful. I envy you. And I can't wait to read what delicious dishes you make with them.

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This is my favorite time of year! Hatch season. I hate the weather, but love the chiles it brings. I saw some very early in the season and picked up 10 or so pounds. I'll get more soon enough.

The first thing I make is a one year supply of chili verde. I don't use anything but hatch chiles for the base. No cheating with tomatillos here. Then I roast the rest and freeze them before skinning and seeding. The skin protects the chiles from freezer burn for year round access.

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I love driving around and smelling the roasters as you drive by...

Indeed, it's time to restock my freezer. -And make some rellenos, stew, etc.

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This is my favorite time of year! Hatch season. I hate the weather, but love the chiles it brings. I saw some very early in the season and picked up 10 or so pounds. I'll get more soon enough.

The first thing I make is a one year supply of chili verde. I don't use anything but hatch chiles for the base. No cheating with tomatillos here. Then I roast the rest and freeze them before skinning and seeding. The skin protects the chiles from freezer burn for year round access.

Cheating?????

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This is my favorite time of year! Hatch season. I hate the weather, but love the chiles it brings. I saw some very early in the season and picked up 10 or so pounds. I'll get more soon enough.

The first thing I make is a one year supply of chili verde. I don't use anything but hatch chiles for the base. No cheating with tomatillos here. Then I roast the rest and freeze them before skinning and seeding. The skin protects the chiles from freezer burn for year round access.

Cheating?????

I employed some hyperbole, but I still think tomatillos are a no-no in chile verde :). All the green and base flavor comes from Hatch chiles when I make it. I think tomatillos end up diluting the flavor of a great chile. When making chile verde I use a ton of roasted green chiles, pork shoulder, onion, garlic, Mexican oregano and pork stock. I don't think it needs anything else.


Edited by avaserfi (log)

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Gotcha. We cannot get Hatch chiles here except in cans (phooey). No wait, we can't get it in cans either...those must be brought back from the States. Such purity is impossible. Ah well...

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The first chiles showed up last weekend, I roasted some and made them into a green chile rub for a pork shoulder. mmm mmm good.

As soon as there are more, I want to do green chile enchiladas, pozole, and a chicken stew I make with sherry and green chiles. I am also going to freeze some for the winter time. CAN'T WAIT.

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Yum.

Are these babies available outside NM and AZ?

They are available in the WA area and currently are on sale for 98 cents a pound at one of our good stores.

Kay

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This is my favorite time of year! Hatch season. I hate the weather, but love the chiles it brings. I saw some very early in the season and picked up 10 or so pounds. I'll get more soon enough.

The first thing I make is a one year supply of chili verde. I don't use anything but hatch chiles for the base. No cheating with tomatillos here. Then I roast the rest and freeze them before skinning and seeding. The skin protects the chiles from freezer burn for year round access.

"Cheating?" I originally got my chile verde recipe from my Mexican neighbor and it and every other chile verde, salsa verde etc., recipe includes tomatillos. They make a pickled sauce using just chiles, but it is a flavoring condiment, not the dish itself.

I don't think that tomatillos "dilute" the flavor, they enhance it in its many variations throughout Mexico where the seasonings change, from region to region, but the base is always chiles (often poblano with other, hotter peppers), tomatillos and onions.

The local produce market has Hatch chiles and they showed up at three different vendors at the farmers' market yesterday.

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I have been using Andie's recipe for about a year now, and it's a house staple :wub: ...except for the fresh tomatillo part. Poblanos, which we can finally get from a local store, and tomatillos...either from NJ, Toronto or canned. Plus the other ingredients of course.

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This is my favorite time of year! Hatch season. I hate the weather, but love the chiles it brings. I saw some very early in the season and picked up 10 or so pounds. I'll get more soon enough.

The first thing I make is a one year supply of chili verde. I don't use anything but hatch chiles for the base. No cheating with tomatillos here. Then I roast the rest and freeze them before skinning and seeding. The skin protects the chiles from freezer burn for year round access.

"Cheating?" I originally got my chile verde recipe from my Mexican neighbor and it and every other chile verde, salsa verde etc., recipe includes tomatillos. They make a pickled sauce using just chiles, but it is a flavoring condiment, not the dish itself.

I don't think that tomatillos "dilute" the flavor, they enhance it in its many variations throughout Mexico where the seasonings change, from region to region, but the base is always chiles (often poblano with other, hotter peppers), tomatillos and onions.

The local produce market has Hatch chiles and they showed up at three different vendors at the farmers' market yesterday.

As I said in a later post hyperbole! I love tomatillos, but for me, the perfect chili verde doesn't need them "authentic" or not. I would expect the the rendition of chili verde I make is more of a Southwestern variation than one found in a region of Mexico.

Care to share a link to your recipe? Maybe I can be converted. :biggrin:


Edited by avaserfi (log)

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