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bmdaniel

The Tiki Drink Discussion Topic

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Wouldn't "rich" simple just be a 2:1 instead of a 1:1 syrup?

I can't think of how you'd make honey syrup either, wouldn't it just end up being another batch of simple with a little honey flavour added?


"...which usually means underflavored, undersalted modern French cooking hidden under edible flowers and Mexican fruits."

- Jeffrey Steingarten, in reference to "California Cuisine".

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Wouldn't "rich" simple just be a 2:1 instead of a 1:1 syrup?

I can't think of how you'd make honey syrup either, wouldn't it just end up being another batch of simple with a little honey flavour added?

Yes rich typically means syrup made at a higher saturation level and often refers to the syrup having been made with a more flavorful sugar as well, such as a Demerara or Turbinado sugar.

Honey syrup is honey that has had water added, either equal parts or 2:1 to make it pour and mix easier. NB 2:1 honey syrup has sweetness comparable to 1:1 simple syrup.


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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It would be interesting to use some honey syrups made with different honeys and see if you can taste the different floral notes of each one.

Thanks for the answer thirtyoneknots. Are there any tiki drinks that use it? I'll admit I'm not yet up to snuff on all my tiki recipes.


"...which usually means underflavored, undersalted modern French cooking hidden under edible flowers and Mexican fruits."

- Jeffrey Steingarten, in reference to "California Cuisine".

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It would be interesting to use some honey syrups made with different honeys and see if you can taste the different floral notes of each one.

Thanks for the answer thirtyoneknots. Are there any tiki drinks that use it? I'll admit I'm not yet up to snuff on all my tiki recipes.

If by "it" you mean honey syrup the answer is yes: Jeff Berry has many recipes calling for honey or honey mix (ie, syrup) in his books. Most notable of these in my estimation is the Navy Grog and its variations. Honey mix/syrup can (and should) always be subbed in any iced drinks calling for honey, just be aware of the preportions used to prepare it and adapt accordingly.


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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I made my first tiki drink tonight!

It is probably all wrong. But it was delicious. I have wanted to try one for a while, due to my thrift store tiki glass collection, er, problem.

I made a Mai Tai. I had a bit of dark rum left over from making coquitos at Christmas, it was Gosling Black label, pretty cheap, and to my completely undeveloped palate kind of delicious. I found a nip of trader joes gold rum at the local liquor store, and figured even with my wretched budget i could make a mai tai. I used a recipe that sugested using amaretto if you can not find orgeat. I can find orgeat, i am just totally broke so i cant really buy it. So.... probably totally wrongly i used it. I had 2 oz of dark and 2 of the gold rum, one of cointreau, and one of the amaretto, and a little simple. I shook it, and poured it over some smashed up ice. I cant stand slushy drinks, so the ice was basicly just pounded with a big screw driver in a plastic bag.

I put it in to one of my naked lady tiki glass, stuck in one of my many many swizzle sticks and drank. wonderful. maybe not right or perfect... but if until now the only tiki drink you had was scorpion bowls or gross hyper pineapple Mai Tais at Kowloon, a great thing. I could taste the dark rum and the light rum. I loved how the dark sugar taste of the dark rum played with the orange.

I will definitely be saving up for some rum bottles.

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Anyone who references drinking at Kowloon is a true believer! Now you're hooked, and you can start improving here and there with wee investments in homemade orgeat, some killer rum, and so on.

Meanwhile, I want to know where you're finding nips of Trader Vic -- I assume "joe" above is a typo -- rum!


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Hi Chris!

you right. Typo ooops.....I love Kowloon! and i used to love even more the other route one Polynesian place that has been gone for years and whose name i forget. I am actually right now eating my cereal from a giant Kowloon fogcutter for two goblet/bad ass cereal bowl.

I live in Somerville MA, and i got the trader Vic nips at the liquor store right next door to my local Foodmaster Supermarket. I don't think it even has a name, it just says Liquor in neon outside. Really small and really really um, basic.

I think i could make some orgeat, and start figuring what i should get for some decent rum! Summer fun!

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What rum(s) do you use in Mai Tais?

I just made one like this:

1 oz El Dorado 15

1 oz Smith & Cross

1 oz lime

1/2 oz curacao (Brizard)

1/4 oz orgeat (Monin... yes Chris, I know, but it's what I had on the shelf)

1/4 oz simple (I use a 2:1 with a bit of vanilla)

...and it's sublime. I mean, significantly decidedly better -- richer, more nuanced in complementary ways -- than my longtime combo of Appleton Estate 12 and Clement VSOP, which served me (and a whole lot of guests) well for ages. I may never make one of those again, unless to prove a point.

So, my question: What other rum(s) should I be trying in a Mai Tai?


John Rosevear

"Brown food tastes better." - Chris Schlesinger

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Made the Smugglers' Cove Top Notch Volcano from the 12/09 NYT tonight in, yep, a volcano bowl complete with a Lemon Hart 151 flame. I skipped the burning spices and used a dash of pimento dram instead, so it went something like this:

4 oz demerara

4 oz lime

4 oz fresh pineapple juice

1 oz passion fruit purée

1 oz Luxardo maraschino

4 oz Plantation Jamaican rum

2 oz Don Q blanco

2 oz Appleton Reserve

1 ounce maraschino liqueur

Shook it all up, poured it over the lagoon of crushed ice, and handed out straws. The MIL liked that plenty. :wink:


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Chris,

I have everything but the Don Q. What would sub well so I can make it before I find some Don Q?


"...which usually means underflavored, undersalted modern French cooking hidden under edible flowers and Mexican fruits."

- Jeffrey Steingarten, in reference to "California Cuisine".

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I was just kludging the "4 ounces aged South American or Caribbean white rum, 4 ounces amber rum" ingredients. I have no idea what those things are (rum takes on color as it ages, of course; one might say it turns amber), so I just came up with something that seemed like it would work.

What do you have on hand?


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I was just kludging the "4 ounces aged South American or Caribbean white rum, 4 ounces amber rum" ingredients. I have no idea what those things are (rum takes on color as it ages, of course; one might say it turns amber), so I just came up with something that seemed like it would work.

What do you have on hand?

Chris,

I'm not sure how an aged South American and a white Caribbean would be similar, except that South American rums tend to be on the harsher side (in my experience anyway, somebody more well-versed in rums please let us know if it's different), and a little age on one might smooth it out some.

As far as my stocks go, I have the usual swill left over from parties, mainly Bacardi Silver and Myers Silver. I also have some Rhum Agricole I haven't used, as well as a Flor de Caña white that I haven't even cracked open yet. I think that's all the clear rums I have that aren't flavoured.

edited: to expand on a thought


Edited by Shamanjoe (log)

"...which usually means underflavored, undersalted modern French cooking hidden under edible flowers and Mexican fruits."

- Jeffrey Steingarten, in reference to "California Cuisine".

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At Tales this year I saw a number of people carrying around real-looking leles, wooden swizzle sticks from the swizzlestick tree. Unfortunately I was too busy enjoying other things to take the time to ask about them. Does anyone here know of a place to purchase them other than flying to Martinique?


Mattias Hägglund

elements restaurant

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I know that cocktailkingdom.com has been trying to source them for sale online. No news yet.

Ask Ed Hamilton, founder of Ministry of Rum, very nicely? We got ours from a bartender who probably got it from Ed or someone who's close to Ed.


"I'll put anything in my mouth twice." -- Ulterior Epicure

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At Tales this year I saw a number of people carrying around real-looking leles, wooden swizzle sticks from the swizzlestick tree. Unfortunately I was too busy enjoying other things to take the time to ask about them. Does anyone here know of a place to purchase them other than flying to Martinique?

Ben Jones (of Rhum Clement) usually walks around with a pocketful during Tales events. I was lucky enough to snag one this year by asking nicely.

I don't know of a source for the real thing, but I've seen a very clever small wooden dowel arrangement that approximate the effect (a slightly larger dowel is bisected at right angles by two smaller dowel stubs at one end). Not sure if anyone is marketing those commercially, but they probably stand up better to wear.

Edit: found a site with pictures: click


Edited by J_Ozzy (log)

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Well, i couldn't find st James, but i got the appleton estates and a barbancourt, because that was about it for darker rums that are not gosling. Most stores by me have the barbancourt, and brugals?which is dominican.

I got an ice crusher from the 50'sat a yard sale that is shaped like a rocket ship. it works like a dream. I got some orgeat by trader tiki. I did not have energy to make it myself, and the fellow in the cocktail store in Davis sq told me this one was good. I have been making Mai Tais. I like them kind of on the limey side. SO much better than a pineapple explosion, and so fun to serve in my naked lady Tiki glasses. For the triple sec I have been using some stuff i got in a new hampshire liquor store for cheap. It is a grand marnier brandy based knock off. It is not as good as cointrea or grand marnier, but does not taste of jolly ranchers like de kuyper etc.

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With summer coming on, I've been thinking about Tiki drinks. I've also been thinking about introducing Bittermens Elemakule bitters to the roasted pineapple bitters I got from the Canadian company House Made. I'm not sure if trying to build a drink around the bitters is considered proper technique but that's basically what I'd like to do. Anyway, any ideas from the Tiki folks?


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Another tiki related question. Tiki drinks seem to frequently call for a 151 rum, the only one available through the LCBO that I'm aware of is Bacardi. Assuming not using 151 is better than using that one, what would I replace it with in the recipes? Wray & Nephew overproof is available, will that do the trick or could I just use whatever I want if getting bombed isn't part of the equation? I guess what I'm trying to figure out is if the high proof rum is part of the tiki profile or if it's just there to boost the booze content.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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This question comes up a lot over on the TikiCentral forum, especially around the time Lemon Hart 151 was thought to be discontinued, and the answer is basically that there is no substitute for 151-proof Demerara rum. Worse, even if you go somewhere where it's available, you can't fly it home. In recipes where there's both a 151-proof Demerara and a dark Jamaican, I've been known to sub JWray overproof and aged Demerara, but the flavour isn't going to be the same. I haven't compared them myself, but from what I've read, the next best option for subbing for Lemon Hart would be another brand of dark overproof rum, like Gosling's, rather than Bacardi or JWray.

It's especially irksome that we can't get the rum here now that a Canadian company owns the Lemon Hart label.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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. . . . Worse, even if you go somewhere where it's available, you can't fly it home. . . .

Is this a hard and fast government regulation, or an airline mandate?

Because I do know that SAS (for example) no longer permits anything that is 140 proof or over in carryon bags (passengers were getting too raucous), but you're still permitted to bring it along in your checked luggage. You may want to check a few different airlines, to see whether their policies vary on this point (I do realize SAS and other Northern European carriers aren't exactly the first ones you think of in conjunction with a trip between North America and, say, Jamaica, but it might be worth looking into, anyway).


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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. . . . Worse, even if you go somewhere where it's available, you can't fly it home. . . .

Is this a hard and fast government regulation, or an airline mandate?

Because I do know that SAS (for example) no longer permits anything that is 140 proof or over in carryon bags (passengers were getting too raucous), but you're still permitted to bring it along in your checked luggage. You may want to check a few different airlines, to see whether their policies vary on this point (I do realize SAS and other Northern European carriers aren't exactly the first ones you think of in conjunction with a trip between North America and, say, Jamaica, but it might be worth looking into, anyway).

I've always based my understanding of this question on government regulations, which appear to apply to both checked and carry-on luggage. When I bought my two bottles of Lemon Hart 151, I made sure to do so on a trip when I would be driving home.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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