• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Kerry Beal

Coffee Cakes - Bake-off XVII

31 posts in this topic

The problem is with the questions, not the answers. If you know what the questions are, you can find the answers. Now I am such a novice at this baking life, that I didn't even know there were questions about how to make sure a bundt cake was done or how to make sure it didn't stick in the pan. So I didn't ask.

Now I know. Yes, my cake was fully baked and is delicious. I baked it a very long time. The old toothpick trick wasn't all that useful, because the pick had to travel through a layer of interior streusel which would not come clean because of its very nature.

However my bundt cake is also in a great number of pieces. It wasn't the cake that stuck. It was the streusel. And stick it did. Despite all my greasing and flouring. Who knew?

Well, now I do. No more bundt cakes for me for a while. We'll eat it and they can all laugh at me and I shall remain above the frey, concentrating on loftier thoughts. :rolleyes:

Thanks to all for the help. What a week. My first springform cheesecake slips and falls through its collar and my first bundt cake is in tatters. At least my blueberry loaves came true on the second try (well, I screwed up the first ones sort of and they turned out more colorful than needed, that sort of gray-purple color).

Please do not hire me to cater your next big fancy do! :wacko:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The problem is with the questions, not the answers.  If you know what the questions are, you can find the answers.  Now I am such a novice at this baking life, that I didn't even know there were questions about how to make sure a bundt cake was done or how to make sure it didn't stick in the pan.  So I didn't ask.

Now I know.  Yes, my cake was fully baked and is delicious.  I baked it a very long time.  The old toothpick trick wasn't all that useful, because the pick had to travel through a layer of interior streusel which would not come clean because of its very nature.

However my bundt cake is also in a great number of pieces.  It wasn't the cake that stuck.  It was the streusel.  And stick it did.  Despite all my greasing and flouring.  Who knew?

Well, now I do.  No more bundt cakes for me for a while.  We'll eat it and they can all laugh at me and I shall remain above the frey, concentrating on loftier thoughts. :rolleyes: 

Thanks to all for the help.  What a week.  My first springform cheesecake slips and falls through its collar and my first bundt cake is in tatters.  At least my blueberry loaves came true on the second try (well, I screwed up the first ones sort of and they turned out more colorful than needed, that sort of gray-purple color).

Please do not hire me to cater your next big fancy do! :wacko:

Bummer about all the problems. When doing a bundt cake with streusel, you do really need to butter the pan well. But, always start with cake batter first, then layer your streusel and more batter, ending with batter. Some streusels can be more sticky. But, as long as the pan is buttered well, it should be fine. Most bundt cakes or any cake in that type of pan, generally take at least an hour to bake.

For blueberry or any berry cake, it usually works best to fold the fruit in gently by hand at the very end. Frozen will work well, just add it last and fold gently. Shouldn't have smurf muffins or cake that way ;). I've seen lots of that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While in Japan I was surprised to discover that what they mean by 'coffee cake' is cake flavored with actual coffee. I also recently had a woman from India ask me for a good coffee cake recipe because she misses 'cake with a good strong coffee flavor.'

I personally don't like coffee, so I am not interested in making such a cake. I was just wondering about how common this use of the term is outside of the US. -And, if it refers to a particular type of product or is as loosely applied as it is here.

The cake I tried in Japan was the cake style, with coffee flavoring the streusel.

I enjoy both styles, but have not perfected a recipe for either. When I lived in Santa Fe (high altitude) I would use the one egg high altitude cake recipe from the 1980's Joy of Cooking and add an improvised struesel topping of butter, sugar, flour and nuts with a dash of nutmeg & cinnamon. At sea level the recipe is really different, even after adjusting and changing the volume measurements to weight measures. So, I haven't been happy about this for 14 years and am looking forward to seeing what others post in this thread.

Happy Baking all!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
At sea level the recipe is really different, even after adjusting and changing the volume measurements to weight measures. So, I haven't been happy about this for 14 years and am looking forward to seeing what others post in this thread.

Lisa, is there a rule of thumb for adjusting for sea level elevation for baking?


edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi R Wood, Lisa Schock et al,

Yes there are specific rules for altering leavening and cooking temps and times for high altitudes and some one else will know them better than I. We lived at 4500' for 6 months last year and I had a chart to help me. There's lots on the web about this.

The Smurf effect...I like that...was because I did something stupid. I answered the phone, forgot to put in the milk before the berries and had to remix the batter.

The bundt thingy. The cake tastes great but I have decided to give it to the young family down the road. They received all my attempts at cake decorating a couple of years ago and my confectionery output (we had to get it out of the house!) so here comes the raggy bundt. I'll make another cake...maybe even with coffe this time. :biggrin: AND in a 9x13 pan for sure!

Thanks for all the help. :wub:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went through a period of making a bunch of different coffee cakes, trying to get one similar to what I used to get at a bakery in Summit, New Jersey (Trost's). Unfortunately, I never succeeded, but I did end up finding this pippin:

Moist Coffee Cake

I was trying to make something similar to this recipe. Either my streusel wouldn't clump together enough, or it would sink through the cake (even if I added it after baking for a bit). They also had a tasty blueberry cake that had a blueberry jam-type thing spread all over the top. That was delicious. Maybe I will start trying again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By ChristysConfections
      Hi everyone!
       
      I hope I'm not posting in the wrong section. I am looking for recommendations on where to find a used/economically priced climate controlled (low humidity and refrigerated, but not too cold) chocolate display case as well as a regular refrigerated display case (bakery style). Something like this, but it doesn't need to be too fancy looking. I am living in Canada on the West Coast, so the closer to local, the better. I'm finding it very challenging to find something. I found and excellent deal on a couple of used ones in the USA, but the seller doesn't want to deal with the hassle of having it crated and shipped. I'm trying to keep up to date searching on the Ecole Chocolat graduate forum as well as The Chocolate Life classifieds. 
       
      Also, does anyone know if a smaller table-top type climates controlled chocolate display case exists? Or are the only options out there for larger models?
       
      Warm Regards,
      Christy
    • By Lam
      So I've been looking for the ultimate matcha brownies (technically blondies but it just doesn't have the same ring to it). I've made chewy and fudgy regular brownies, but I find white chocolate based blondies to be much trickier. I have made a few matcha brownie recipes in the past, but they all came out sad and cakey. So I have taken it upon myself to come up with my own recipe. My matcha brownies came out very moist and "fudgy" but not chewy. I'm thinking next time I should try using vegetable oil instead of butter and only dark brown sugar. 


    • By ltjazz
      Hey all,
       
      I've made thicker and creamier sorbets with 25% to 35% sugar strained fruit purees and sugar, syrups, and other stabilizers that have worked well. However, because it's so much fruit and little to no water it can be an expensive project.
       
      I am trying to make "Water Ice" or "Italian Ice" in my home ice cream machine. Think of textures similar to Rita's Water Ice, Court Pastry Shop, or Miko's in Chicago. It eats much lighter than a sorbet but isn't really icy, but it's also not thick like sorbet. Ritas uses "flavoring" and sugar, while the other two use fruit juice. I'm thinking of thinning the strained fruit juice with water and adding a stabilizer, but I'm having trouble getting this in my home ice cream machine without it freezing solid like granita.
       
      Can anyone suggest a way to use real fruit juice, water, and a combination and concentration of stabilizers to get a looser, frozen fruit dessert that isn't icy?
    • By Mette
      I've searched high and low for a recipe for lemon mousse, firm enough to make little 'eggs' to go on a dessert plate. Ideally, it should not be based on lemon curd or lemon cream, but just plain old lemons.
      Also, please throw me the best chocolate mousse recipe EVER - I'm in a mousse phase....
      Thanks in advance.
    • By B Edulis
      Once again, I tried to recreate my mother's shortbread cookies, using her recipe, and they didn't turn out. They were so crumbly they fell apart when you picked them up. I'm very attached to this particular recipe -- she told me that she got it from the first boy who ever kissed her, whose Scottish mother was renowned for them. That's one way to get a recipe!) She made them at all holidays. Here the recipe:
      1 cup of butter
      1/2 cup of sugar
      2 cups of flour
      pinch salt
      I've been creaming the butter and suger and adding the flour, chilling it and rolling it out and baking them at about 300 degrees. They spread more than hers did and they're just way crumbly. The taste is good, though.
      I wish I could as her for advice, but she's no longer with us -- can anyone help me?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.