Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Korean Roasted Corn Tea (oksusu-cha)


Richard Kilgore
 Share

Recommended Posts

In the Barley Tea topic, torakris mentioned Korean Roasted Corn Tea:

At a lot of the Korean restaurants in Japan I would be served what I thought was a strongly brewed mugicha but it turns out it wasn't mugi (barley) at all, rather it was roasted corn tea (called oksusu-cha in Korean). This is now one of my favoite teas andi actually make it more than mugicha now....

I was shopping at the local Super H-Mart yesterday and picked up a bag of the roasted corn. I chose the Soong Yung Tea brand (I guess that's the brand) after asking a woman who waited on me in the fast food kiosk. She said it was the best one with the best flavor.

So, now that I have a bag of it, how do I make it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yoonhi will put a good sized handful into a wire basket, and then put this into a big metal kettle (about 3 gallons) and then boil it for a bit. You could forego the wire basket, and just strain it later.

(It's a good idea to strain it, otherwise you always get this subliminal feeling that there are dead bugs in there.)

Then she sets it aside until cool, bottles it in our empty water bottles, and puts it in the fridge.

Me, I prefer the roasted barely tea for a hot day (boricha).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are these roasted grain teas usually drunk chilled?

I have never tried roasted barley or roasted corn tea, but I love love love toasted barley and toasted barley flour in baked goods, and I probably should try it as tea.

We like them hot, or chilled, or room temperature. For me, on a blazing summer's day a large glass of cold bori cha is a very nice thing (although a Korean would tell you not to drink cold things in hot weather).

Likewise, in the dead of winter, a hot glass of one of these grain teas fills your nose with the memories of Autumn.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting. This tastes like slightly over-roasted popcorn - on the edge of burnt. That said, I think I brewed it a little weak. Maybe 1/2 cup pr more per liter would be better.

This brand clearly looked roasted more than the others. Do most not have the near-burnt taste?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It should definitely looked "packed" rather than weak. Work with the brand you have until you feel comfortable.

You've inspired me to get a few bottles into the fridge for tomorrow (but bori - barley - as I still prefer that to usuzucha).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've actually been mixing barley and corn--half and half--though I'm happy with all corn or all barley too. What I've been doing is filling a pot with water, throwing maybe 10 tablespoons in (covering the surface of the water), bringing it all to a boil, and then letting it steep for a few hours or overnight. (This is basically due to laziness more than any scientific method--I need it cool down a bit but don't want to watch it, but it secondarily allows it to steep nicely.) Then I strain it into a gallon pitcher and stick it in the frig. Makes such a great cold drink.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...