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iainpb

Sauce cookbook

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I'm looking for a decent book on making sauces, i can knock out a basic roux and veloute and vary these but would like to learn more techniques and a good range of sauces for various meats / veg etc. Can anyone recommend a good all round sauce book.

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For the traditional European sauces I like the classics like Escoffier and Ranhofer's _Epicurean_. You can download _The Epicurean_ in two PDF files from this great collection of historic American cookbooks--

http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbo...oks/book_47.cfm

Here's the main entry page for the site--

http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/index.html

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I'm looking for a decent book on making sauces, i can knock out a basic roux and veloute  and vary these but would like to learn more techniques and a good range of sauces for various meats / veg etc. Can anyone recommend a good all round sauce book.

I recommend James Peterson's Sauces. Materials are clearly presented and covers a range of classical and modern sauces.

There is also The Saucier's Apprentice by Raymond Sokolov. Old school.

Have fun!


Cognito ergo consume - Satchel Pooch, Get Fuzzy

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I too suggest Escoffier's Guide Culinaire, it's the standard reference for classic French professional recipes. The Cracknell/Kaufman English translation has gone in and out of print, last few decades; even when out of print it's been readily available used. Much of the post-1900 writing about French recipes is traceable to this book. The 5012 recipes begin with basic stocks. Sauces start simple ("Foundation or Basic sauces -- Espagnole (brown sauce), Velouté, Béchamel, tomato") and proceed to a few hundred progressively more complex variations. Posted further comments on Amazon listing.

Ranhofer's Epicurean (note spelling) is a US book, vast and idiosyncratic, subject of a separate thread here. Which cites a 1992 Evan Jones essay giving the story of the book's creation.

The contrast in genesis of these two compendia is remarkable. I gather the GC's origin was at least partly defensive (against bogus or short-cut French recipes), while the Epicurean was a work of revenge (publishing the recipes of the then-dominant US restaurant family).

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I've been trying to read Peterson's Sauces. So far I find it very, hmmm, how do I say this, close minded/intolerant. His opinions, presented as facts, seem to be all based on very old school beliefs. For me, it's a hard read.

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I've been trying to read Peterson's Sauces.  So far I find it very, hmmm, how do I say this, close minded/intolerant.  His opinions, presented as facts, seem to be all based on very old school beliefs.  For me, it's a hard read.

Well, the basis for most sauces are very very old school I haven't read it myself, though it was recommended by every Chef instructor I had at school.

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Thanks for the replies all.

Peterson's books is certainly looking like a good option, though from the reviews i have read here and on Amazon it seems a few people disagree with his general philosophy of cooking. I will try and pick up a copy in a bookshop and have a good look through.

Another book that looks quite worth a read is Michel Roux's Michel Roux - Sauces

has anyone read this book?

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I've been trying to read Peterson's Sauces.  So far I find it very, hmmm, how do I say this, close minded/intolerant.  His opinions, presented as facts, seem to be all based on very old school beliefs.  For me, it's a hard read.

Well, the basis for most sauces are very very old school I haven't read it myself, though it was recommended by every Chef instructor I had at school.

Depends on what sauces and who's school, doesn't it? Within the French/Continental tradition -- backbone of most culinary schools of course -- that's true. But there are lots of other sauce traditions off the continent.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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The Peterson book is the best sauce book I've seen. In fact it's the best cookbook I've seen, in terms of the sheer depth and breadth of the knowledge it encompasses, and its clear and systematic approach.

That said, I think it's showing its age and limitations.

I'm ok with it being euro-centric (or whatever you want to call it). I don't think one author and one book can be expected to conquer the entire world.

My problem is that Peterson hasn't kept up with the important things going on in his own tradition. He was the beacon of cutting edge saucemaking up until 1990 or so, and then aparently just stopped caring. I was excited when the third edition came out. I assumed he'd been busy cataloging all the various hydrocolloids, new methods of reduction and clarification, and other techniques gaining traction throughout the U.S. and Europe at high end restaurants. Instead, these ideas are mentioned in the intro in a list of what WON'T be covered. Hello?

I was disappointed. But this is because the book isn't living up to its potential anymore. Not the same as saying another book does it better..


Notes from the underbelly

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Peterson is the best by a mile / Good conceptual introduction, particularly on stocks.

I've been trying to read Peterson's Sauces.  So far I find it very, hmmm, how do I say this, close minded/intolerant.  His opinions, presented as facts, seem to be all based on very old school beliefs.

The Peterson book is the best sauce book I've seen. In fact it's the best cookbook I've seen, in terms of the sheer depth and breadth...

How do you folks compare or contrast it to the corresponding sections of the Guide Culinaire?

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How do you folks compare or contrast it to the corresponding sections of the Guide Culinaire?

Very different. The Guide Culinaire is a recipe book, based 100% on style and orthodoxy of La Cuisine Classique ... the cooking style developed largely by Carême after the French Revolution and further codified by Escoffier.

It's important largely as a historical document. Much of today's cooking points back to classical French cooking in one way or another--either by direct descent, clever reference, or outright rebellion. Because of this it's useful to have the original text for reference, whether or not you plan to actually make any of the recipes.

Peterson's book attempts to be encyclopedic. He provides a researched history of Wetern saucemaking, starting with ancient Greece, continuing through classical French and Nouvelle cuisine, and culminating sometime in the late 20th century.

He then discusses ingredients and techniques and styles, establishing a kind of theoretical and historical framework for understanding the recipes.

The book (starting with the second edition) branched into Latin and Asian sauces and techniques, but these are clearly peripheral interests to Peterson. It's not where he comes from. His inclusion of these sauces demonstrates that he understands their importance, but if you want to dig deeper you'll need to look to his bibiliography (which is one of the most useful sections in the book, btw).

The core of the book is classical French sauces and techniques, along with two major waves of their reinterpretation: Nouvelle Cuisine (where demi-glace is replaced with glace de viande, reduced cream, and mounted butter); and more contemporary versions, like 1990s-style, unbound, broth-like sauces.

He talks about bad contemporary practices in restaurant kitchens (shortcuts that squander flavor in the name of economy) but he also promotes many contemporary techniques that were unheard of in classical times. Like alternatie methods for making meat coulis, and alternative liaisons, like purees and a whole range of purified starches.

What's missing is the latest wave of techniques and ingredients. You won't find anything about gums and other modern hydrocolloids, or about gelatin clarification, vacuum reduction, or laboratory filtration. I'd be happy to have Peterson for the fundamentals, and to get another book that thoroughly teaches the new stuff ... but that other book doesn't seem to exist yet.


Notes from the underbelly

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Another book that looks quite worth a read is Michel Roux's Michel Roux - Sauces

has anyone read this book?

I have had this book for a while, bought it at a book promotion attended by Michel Roux who was very charming.

I would guess this is far less comprehensive than the others mentioned above, none of which I have seen, but it is a good book for basic and classical sauces with a few other thrown in such as chutneys and flavoured oils.

The layout of the recipes is easy to follow and the photographs are helpful and inspiring.

You will not find any unusual ingredients and I think the hardest thing for me to get hold of would be veal bones for the stock.

Very happy to provide more detail if you have specific questions about what recipes it contains.

Lapin

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Another book that looks quite worth a read is Michel Roux's Michel Roux - Sauces

has anyone read this book?

Very happy to provide more detail if you have specific questions about what recipes it contains.

Lapin

If you wouldnt mind as i havent been able to find this in local bookstores and amazon doesnt have 'look inside' for this book.

Is it generally a 'recipe book' rather than theory / technique - does it mainly base itslef on classical sauces or are there modern sauces too.

I'm looking for a good mix of french / italiain/ asian aswell as some theory on how to vary sauces and tips on matching them to foods. It's a lot to ask for one book i know. In your opinion how much does Roux Sauces meet this?

Thanks for the help

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i like A Fresh Look at Saucing Foods by Deidre Davis. it gives a basic recipe then gives you ideas of which other foods could be paired with the sauce.


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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More info on Roux Sauces:

This is very much a home cooks book, not heavy french classical but traditional none the less. No foams. Each recipe has serving suggestions at the start. Good basic book but not anything like a 'bible'. 175 pages with lots of pictures.

Chapter Headings with info on some of the recipes in each:

Intro - advice, equipment (nothing more complex than a bain marie)

Stocks -(veal, chicken, lamb, game, fish, vegetable, cooked marinade) no fancy clarifications with egg whites or trendy bags, just a fine sieve.

Liaisons & Instant Sauces -(use of egg yolk, starches, cream, blood, breadcrumbs, butter, beurre manie, roux, vinaigrettes) then example recipes ie thai vinaigrette with lemongrass, crustacean oil, pistou sauce

Flavoured Butters & Vegetable Coulis - classics such as anchovy, maitre d'hotel .., range of vegetable coulis, tomato, morel, parsley

Sauces & Chutneys for Terrines, Pates & Game - port sauce, apple, poivrade, pumpkin, venison & blackberry, peach chutney

Sauces for fish - Nantua, champagne, Americaine, Thermidor, Mango, Curried Mussel, Mandarin, Matelote, raspberry scented oyster sauce

Emulsion Sauces - mayonniase, gabriche, aioli, tartare, hollandiase, beurre blanc,

White Sauces - bechamel, coconut & chilli pepper, aurora, bread sauce, parsley, sorrel, soubise, mornay

Brown Sauces - Chasseur, Periguex, Orange, Bologniase, Chicken sauce with curacao, curry sauce which is mainly fruit, onion, curry powder & coconut and almost deliaesque

Dessert Sauces - stock syrup, orange butter, creme anglais, liquorice, prune & armagnac, caramel, chocolate,

If you are only going to buy one book then this is perhaps not the one as there are clearly more comprehensive ones out there but if you want a primer this is pretty good.

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Thanks lapin d'or - that's a great help and the roux book will be one of the ones I pick up, that and probably Peterson.

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Another home cooks book on sauces that I have is the Sauces volume from the The Good Cook Series, Time Life. ISBN 7054 0613X.

This has a more international selection of recipes but also more detailed notes/pictures on the preparation of stocks and reductions.

I think books from this series can often be found for about £5 from second hand book sellers.

It would be worth a look.

Lapin

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Anyone know anything about "Paul Gayler's Sauce Book: 300 World Sauces Made Simple" ?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Paul-Gaylers-Sauce.../dp/1856268004/

Author is exec chef at a very expensive London hotel, with seven other published titles, even if he wasn't on my radar!


"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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Anyone know anything about "Paul Gayler's Sauce Book: 300 World Sauces Made Simple" ?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Paul-Gaylers-Sauce.../dp/1856268004/

Author is exec chef at a very expensive London hotel, with seven other published titles, even if he wasn't on my radar!

I have just purchased this book from Amazon after a direct recommendation from Market Kitchen (a UK TV channel) via a social network so i will be able to give you more infor once it arrives but from flicking through it in a local bookstore it looks pretty good.

It covers sauces by region including classical French and this section seemed fairly thorough, other regions included Asia and Pacific Rim and a final section on dessert sauces.

There is a small primer on theory covering roux, emulsions etc and each recipe seemed fairly well written with suggestions of what the sauce would accompany. The only potential issue i see is the reciped are only ordered by region and not by main dish ingredient - so you would not for example be able to find a sauce to pair with chicken without searching through the book. That said - it seems a fairly good intro and covers a large amount of sauce recipes.


Edited by iainpb (log)

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In addition Paul Gaylor wrote the sauces section of the Cook's Book.

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Any books/chefs who are particularly good at rethinking classic sauces?

I was just reading a Japanese magazine (Senmon Ryouri) which has a sauce feature this issue, and enjoying the thinking behind each chef's saucemaking. For example, one guy says that he doesn't like to add vegetables to fond-based sauces for roast pigeons, because he thinks that the sweetness of the vegetables conflicts with the sweetness of the meat. That sounds like an approach that could be rewarding with rabbit, which can be very sweet (not that I'll have the chance to try that experiment any time soon).

What books in English would include that kind of discussion plus recipes/techniques?

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Anyone know anything about "Paul Gayler's Sauce Book: 300 World Sauces Made Simple" ?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Paul-Gaylers-Sauce.../dp/1856268004/

Author is exec chef at a very expensive London hotel, with seven other published titles, even if he wasn't on my radar!

I have just purchased this book from Amazon after a direct recommendation from Market Kitchen (a UK TV channel) via a social network so i will be able to give you more infor once it arrives but from flicking through it in a local bookstore it looks pretty good. ...

I found it for £4.99 at thebookpeople.co.uk and succumbed. (To other temptations as well ...) Their delivery is usually about a week. Patience!


"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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What books in English would include that kind of discussion plus recipes/techniques?

I mostly see this kind of discussion in books by individual chefs about their own cooking styles.

Seems like everyone has opinions on how the flavors of classic sauces can be improved, especially when it comes to the stock itself: cut the mirepoix in half; use two batches of mirepoix; cut out the cellery; replace the cellery with cellery root; never ever brown the bones; brown the bejeezus out of everything; leave out tomatoes; use more tomatoes and cook them down to brown paste; leave out the onions; blacken the onions; add pigs feet; add chicken feet; use blonde roux instead of brown; use arrowroot instead off roux; use gums instead of starch ...

I'm sure anyone passionate enough to issue manifestos like these will end up making a pretty good sauce. As far as which method you'll prefer ... I don't see any way around trial and error. Maybe start with methods used by chefs whose food you like.


Notes from the underbelly

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