Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

KD1191

Rogue (now beta) Cocktails

Recommended Posts

Italian Heirloom (Maks Pazuniak) with Cynar, blended scotch (I substituted Glenfiddich 12), Laphroaig, pinch of salt, lemon peel. This one has the particularity of using the oils from multiple lemon twists.

After the shock of the first sip (sweet, bitter, smoke, gasoline...), it grew on me, and I enjoyed the herbal notes of the Cynar with the essential oils from the lemon.

10682807404_0ec0888272_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another one from Maks Pazuniak.

Growing Old and Dying Happy is a Hope, Not an Inevitability (aka Growing Old for short): Cynar, Rittenhouse rye, salt, absinthe rinse, lemon peel.

10791576413_42893dffd9_z.jpg

This cocktail was actually the precursor to the Italian Heirloom. It's a very nice cocktail with Cynar as the base and a pinch of salt to control bitterness. Absinthe nose (I used a spray of St. George - original recipe calls for Herbsaint). First I tasted the lemon oils and the herbal notes from the Cynar, then some sweetness and caramel. The finish is nicely bitter and the cocktail feels very fresh.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Moment of Silence (Maks Pazuniak): rye, apricot liqueur, Averna, Angostura bitters, apple brandy, Campari rinse. For the apple brandy, the recipe calls for Lairds bonded; I substituted calvados.

I find that the taste of Rothman & Winter apricot liqueur can be candy-like and unpleasant in cocktails when used in large quantities. In this cocktail, it disappears and blends harmoniously with the other ingredients. (Note that the original recipe specifies Marie Brizard which is what I plan on buying when this bottle is empty.)

I got a very pleasant bittersweet orange flavor from the cocktail, with a great "bite". Tons of interesting flavors from the Averna and Angostura, without a heavy feel. Great drink for a contemplative mood.

11182124536_536b498ac1_z.jpg


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Frog -- please let us know what you think of Apry re R&W Orchard Apricot. I'm afraid to buy another bottle of MB product as I've been disappointed in every one I've tried. I don't much like fruity liqueurs, but I don't object to Orchard Apricot in limited quantities. The candy-like aspect I find is much stronger in Peach liqueur, such as Mathilde Pêche, which I think requires a deft hand to avoid craptailosity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On its own, Mathilde Pêche tastes like melted peach jolly rancher. Miraculously, in drinks with other strong elements (like your Georgita) it can contribute some natural, and delicious, peach flavors. But I don't think I'll be replacing my half bottle when I'm through with it. Does anyone know of a better peach liqueur? If only peach season lasted longer than it takes to read this sentence...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not the right thread for a detailed discussion, but I've had great success with a recipe for mandarin liqueur which involves suspending three mandarins (in cheesecloth) above - not in - high-strength alcohol for three weeks, then sweetening. It pulls an amazing amount of flavour out of the fruit, and I'm planning to try the same sort of thing with apricots and/or peaches (this season's are just starting to appear; they should be better in another few weeks).

Might be worth trying your own with some Everclear.

Edited for spelling, dammit.


Edited by lesliec (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On its own, Mathilde Pêche tastes like melted peach jolly rancher. Miraculously, in drinks with other strong elements (like your Georgita) it can contribute some natural, and delicious, peach flavors. But I don't think I'll be replacing my half bottle when I'm through with it. Does anyone know of a better peach liqueur? If only peach season lasted longer than it takes to read this sentence...

Rafa,

Briottet peach liqueur is very good and tastes natural (official name is "crème de pêche de vigne") . It's nice in champagne cocktails and also in Fish House Punch.

What do you use your peach liqueur for? (Are there a bunch of girly drinks that you make on regular basis and don't tell us about? I am concerned!)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rafa is a young man. It's natural for him to experiment.

Experimenting is perfectly fine and actually encouraged.

I was objecting to the fact that he was not sharing his findings with us, that's all. I feel left out.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rafa -- make your own peach liqueur: select the pink Skittles from a bag and infuse in can of turpentine.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With Rafa's interests (and manly credentials) in mind, earlier this week I started a batch of what I hope will end up as peach liqueur in a few weeks. I'll keep you all posted (probably in the Infusions thread).

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rafa's silence speaks volumes...

Anyway, here is an Angostura Sour that I made the other night: Angostura bitters, lime juice, simple syrup, egg white; a variation on a Charles H. Baker's recipe. Egg white shaken by hand ("dry" first with the lime juice) which worked great this time.

Aesthetically it's not the most-pleasing; the cocktail is very dark with a maroon color and the foam is colored as well. Flavor-wise, mostly cinnamon and lime. Bitter but less than you would imagine. Good digestif for an upset stomach.

11283962696_0f77a8e93d_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rafa posted something on Kindred yesterday about the Michigander, a creation by Jason Schiffer of 320 Main in Seal Beach, with apple brandy, Cynar, lemon juice, and honey syrup. On Cocktail virgin slut it says that it is reminiscent of another cocktail combining rosemary and Cynar, Rosemary's Baby from Rogue cocktails, so I decided to try that instead. It's not included in beta cocktails.

First you have to light up a fire with fresh rosemary and Grand Marnier. It was fun and burned for a long while. I used 1/2 oz of Grand Marnier (instead of 3/4 oz) since someone had mentioned in the comments that the cocktail was a little sweet.

11347056383_9a6035faf4_z.jpg

It's actually not a good idea to do this in your mixing glass, because it was very hot by the time the flame had died off and I had to transfer the rosemary-infused Grand Marnier to another vessel for stirring. The other ingredients are applejack (I went with calvados), Cynar, orange and grapefruit bitters.

11347071623_e83f52f78c_z.jpg

The orange flavor of the Grand Marnier was not detectable. The rosemary flavor was subtle and completed the cocktail, which tasted like a caramel apple with a little bitterness. Rich but not too sweet.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do apologize for my silence on the matter of peach. I slipped into a diabetic coma after following Dan's suggestion.

Looking forward to your results, Leslie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With Rafa's interests (and manly credentials) in mind, earlier this week I started a batch of what I hope will end up as peach liqueur in a few weeks. I'll keep you all posted (probably in the Infusions thread).

I do apologize for my silence on the matter of peach. I slipped into a diabetic coma after following Dan's suggestion.

Looking forward to your results, Leslie.

Alas, the experiment failed. The alcohol sucked no flavour at all from the peaches, and I have to confess peaches were harmed in the making of the attempt.

But see this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Made a Rosemary's Baby, too, with the same improvement suggested in the comments section of the cocktail virgin slut post. It's ... man, this drink fast forwards you to autumn. Winter, even. Makes me think of the probably mythical image of people aging barrels of applejack in a forest. In snow. When the rosemary is probably dead from frost or something.

And yeah, it does burn for a good long while and heat up the glass nicely (with your experience in mind I did that part in a little glass dish). You'd have a real good time making these after knocking back a few drinks.


Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boudreau has something in the same vein with flamed rosemary (using green chartreuse as the fuel) - see his Rubicon cocktail. I haven't tried it but have been intrigued. Sadly, my rosemary plant has died since I've made the Rosemary's Baby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heart of Glass for me last night. Interesting room-temperature drink created by Troy Sidle. For this one, first you coat a glass with bourbon (the recipe calls for Eagle Rare 10 years, I went with St. George Breaking & Entering). Then you mix separately 1.5 oz bourbon with 3/4 oz each Cynar and sweet vermouth (Carpano Antica is specified, I used Cocchi vermouth di Torino) and 17 drops of Angostura. I only made a half cocktail so I used 8 drops... The whole thing sounded a little OCD to me but I went with it; I transferred the ango into a suitable delivery device and patiently counted each drop. This is all done without ice, so a little bit of water is added for dilution (~ 1/2 oz).

The mix is added to the coated glass and a bunch of orange oil is added - I used three fairly large pieces of orange peel, and you can see the oil sheen at the surface.

 

13299594183_795cc62b33_z.jpg
 

It's close on paper to Audrey Saunders' Little Italy (rye vs. bourbon, etc) but the vibe is very different because of the serving temperature.

I really liked it. It did not feel bitter to me at all except a bit in the finish, but I am so used to Cynar now that I may not be a very good judge.

 

Of course the song is still stuck in my head, even the morning after.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Realized I had finally gotten a copy of the book but hadn't delved into it yet. So tonight I went "Under the Volcano". Always a fan of a good tequila cocktail and this did not disappoint.

attachicon.gifIMG_6167mod.jpg

Anejo tequila (I substituted El Major for Tesoro since both were highland tequilas and I hoped that might make it a decent sub) along with lime juice, yellow chartreuse, cynar and agave nectar. Plenty of agave flavor in this but the cynar seemed to keep it from being too sweet. Definitely one to make again.

 

 

I liked it too. I used Siete Leguas añejo.

 

13318239704_95f8f9bda2_z.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meant to post a few nights ago that I finally got around to having The Last Mechanical Art. Like pretty much everything in this book, it's a brilliant drink. I'm looking forward to having a couple more of them before my supply of Punt e Mes runs out, and even then I'll probably try it with plain ol' sweet vermouth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After trying Underberg for the first time on Sunday (it was less bitter than I expected and has a very strong licorice flavor), I tried Charles Joly's Red Light (genever, Grand Marnier, Underberg). It was created with Bols genever; I substituted St. George dry rye gin. It was surprisingly drinkable and worked great with the dry rye gin, the crisp flavors of which seemed to resonate with the other ingredients.

 

14471393717_bbc5a57f8a_z.jpg
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Teenage Riot (Tonia Guffey) with Cynar, rye (Bulleit), dry vermouth (Dolin), dry sherry (Lustau Jarana), orange bitters (Regan's), flamed lemon twist.

Lemon aroma, bitter, herbal, dry. It did not last very long.

 

 

14926292247_0ffdebbe5b_z.jpg
 

On an unrelated note, my bottle of sherry seems to possess superpowers. It fell from the top shelf of the fridge to the (stone) floor which it hit, but then just rolled without breaking (this is what happens when I try to carry 3 bottles out of the fridge at the same time). A small miracle. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Teenage Riot (Tonia Guffey) with Cynar, rye (Bulleit), dry vermouth (Dolin), dry sherry (Lustau Jarana), orange bitters (Regan's), flamed lemon twist.

Lemon aroma, bitter, herbal, dry. It did not last very long.

 

 

14926292247_0ffdebbe5b_z.jpg
 

On an unrelated note, my bottle of sherry seems to possess superpowers. It fell from the top shelf of the fridge to the (stone) floor which it hit, but then just rolled without breaking (this is what happens when I try to carry 3 bottles out of the fridge at the same time). A small miracle. 

 

Delighted to hear you finally found some decent sherry and the Teenage Riot is a great place to start! Might be fun to play with a few different sherries to see what works best. I have pretty consistently used the Lustau Los Arcos Amontillado to good result. Probably not quite as dry as the Fino with a hint of raisin-y sweetness. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Delighted to hear you finally found some decent sherry and the Teenage Riot is a great place to start! Might be fun to play with a few different sherries to see what works best. I have pretty consistently used the Lustau Los Arcos Amontillado to good result. Probably not quite as dry as the Fino with a hint of raisin-y sweetness. 

 

I second that.  The Teenage Riot is a stunningly good drink, and I'm sure I can taste the Amontillado as one of the (many) flavours.  But then I haven't tried it with a fino.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Kitchenista
      At this time of year when you can hoard fresh, local strawberries because they are so abundant, why not freeze them and enjoy them all year long. Then you won't have to buy tasteless, fake looking ones in the dead of winter!

      The best way to preserve them, sugar-free, and have them fresh, year-round is to freeze them. Remember to start with the freshest strawberries possible. Strawberries start to lose freshness and nutrients quickly and will only last a few days in the fridge, so the sooner you freeze them the better. Follow these steps and they will last up to a year in the freezer:
      1. Gently wash them and pat them dry or allow them to air dry for an hour or so. Slice off the tops, including the stem and any white area, then cut them in half lengthwise.
      2. Line one or more rimmed baking sheets (depending on how many berries you have) with parchment or SilPats. Arrange them in a single layer on the sheets. and place them, uncovered, or loosely covered with plastic wrap in the freezer. Allow them to freeze solid, about 12 hours. Once frozen, transfer the berries (they may stick to the parchment a bit, but peel off relatively easy) to a freezer weight plastic zipper bag. Press out as much of the air from the bag as possible before sealing, to minimize freezer burn over time. If you are planning to leave them in the freezer for months, then consider double bagging them. Place the bagged berries in the freezer, where they will keep for up to one year.
      Note: I will warn you that the thawed berries will not be firm and bright like they were when raw and fresh. They tend to thaw out a bit mushier, and slightly darker…but can still be used for anything you would use fresh strawberries for. For smoothies, use frozen.
      Optional: Brushing the berries with a bit of lemon juice before you freeze them will help to preserve their color. While strawberries can be frozen whole, cut or crushed, they will retain a higher level of their vitamin C content if left whole.
    • By boilsover
      My Breville BSO 800XL  just died on it's second birthday, after only *extremely* light use at my beach house.  Just won't power up.
       
      Reading online, I learned that a common failure mode is the thermal fuse blowing -WHICH IS DESIGNED TO BLOW AT <450F.  This is a $3 part at Radio Shack, and there is a detailed instruction on how to replace it here:  http://virantha.com/2014/03/02/fix-your-breville-smart-oven-by-replacing-the-thermal-fuse/
       
      So I guess I'll give fixing it myself a try and report back.  Has anyone here done this repair?  Was it successful?  And why would Breville use a fuse that is lower than the appliance's top heat settings?
       
      Thanks!
    • By Franzisaurus_Rex
      I've had an idea flowing across my brain waves over the last few months. It's on every channel and I'm getting ready to pull the trigger. 
      I'd like to try to braise a dish in my smoker. I am thinking of braising a rabbit, but the I'm not looking for guidance on the protein/ingredients, rather the technique. I turn to you, o internet, in hope you will tell me your secrets.
      Has anyone ever braised in their smoker before? I've done some research, but I haven't seen much on the "how to" for the technique. Here's my plan:
      - Brown the rabbits on skillet (stovetop)
      - Get the aromatics/other stuffz sweated browned, etc.
      - (MEANWHILE) Smoker heats up to 300-325 degrees.
      - Add stock to rabbit, bring to a simmer on the stove top.
      - Transfer to smoker, braise uncovered for 1-2 hours, then cover with foil to finish for as long as necessary.
      I've seen folks smoke and then braise, but I haven't seen much on the idea of braising something IN the smoker. I saw something on CookingwithMe.at about doing something similar with pork belly, but that's about it.
      All I know is that after using stock+drippings from a smoked turkey created this CRAZY MIND-BLOWING flavor, so I'm basing this a lot off that idea.
      -Franz
    • By boilsover
      The 2017 iteration of the International Home & Housewares Show is being held March 18-21 at McCormick Place in Chicago.  This is the world's 2nd-largest tradeshow for the cookware and housewares industry, close behind Ambiente in Frankfurt.  It is a cornucopia of what's new and what's coming down the pike in the world of cookware, and if you've ever wondered about why makers do the things they do, this is your opportunity to talk with execs and their product development people (e.g., you can discuss ceramics with the 6th-gen owner of Emile Henry).  It takes an able cookware geek a full two days to cover all the booths.
       
      Are any eGulls or eGuys besides me attending? 
    • By chromedome
      I'm posting it here on the grounds that national Food Guides are, by their nature, intended to be used as references. 
       
      Many of you will have read today's news stories about the proposed changes to Canada's food guidelines. All of the stories I read mentioned that Health Canada was soliciting input from the general public, as well as health/food industry professionals. None of them, alas, actually gave a link to the "consultation" page at Health Canada's website. For those who wish to weigh in, here it is:
       
      http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/health-system-systeme-sante/consultations/foodguide-guidealimentaire/index-eng.php
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×