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KD1191

Rogue (now beta) Cocktails

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Very interesting Mayur! Is this more or less a Suze-alike? Or similar enough/in the same family enough to make a workable substitution (like, say, using Cinzano sweet vermouth instead of M&R)? Or is it more of a unique product?

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Suze was supposed to be imported into the U.S. in 2010 and has been spotted in liquor stores in New Orleans that year (the group of people I stayed with for Tales that year bought a bottle as they stocked the bed&breakfast's bar). Now it's slated again to be here this year (but I will believe it when I see it on a shelf):

My linkhttp://offthepresses.blogspot.com/2011/09/suze-to-finally-reach-us-shores.html

Mayur, we are definitely looking forward to the Bittermen's liqueurs reaching our shelves (you can't mail them to us here in Massachusetts). I definitely am glad that an Amer Picon-like spirit will be available for I find it a sin against mankind if someone cannot mix up a proper Brooklyn. Any word on the price point for these liqueurs?

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Very interesting Mayur! Is this more or less a Suze-alike? Or similar enough/in the same family enough to make a workable substitution (like, say, using Cinzano sweet vermouth instead of M&R)? Or is it more of a unique product?

It's definitely similar enough to substitute; we've been using it for white Negronis and Arawaks and Mayahuel had it in their Suzie Q. It is slightly bitterer, the difference being almost entirely, if I may rather self-promotingly speculate, in the quality and type of gentian (the brix is identical to that of Suze and the HB Gentiane de Luxe, with the pH maybe a nod less acid). If using in large amounts (say, drinking it on the rocks with soda), I would recommend adding 1/4 tsp simple per 2 oz pour if you want the milder gentian feel of Suze itself. But for cocktail applications, it's basically a 1:1.

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Mayur, we are definitely looking forward to the Bittermen's liqueurs reaching our shelves (you can't mail them to us here in Massachusetts). I definitely am glad that an Amer Picon-like spirit will be available for I find it a sin against mankind if someone cannot mix up a proper Brooklyn. Any word on the price point for these liqueurs?

We are looking at $24.99 per 375ml bottle retail. Not cheap, I know, but these are ingredients that are largely used in half-ounce pours, so the overall calculus shouldn't be too bad.

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Any time frame available yet for when the Bitterman spirits like Amère Nouvelle and Amère Sauvage might be available on an internet retailer like Drinkupny or similar? Not much access down here in Atlanta (or anywhere near by) yet it would appear.

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Any time frame available yet for when the Bitterman spirits like Amère Nouvelle and Amère Sauvage might be available on an internet retailer like Drinkupny or similar? Not much access down here in Atlanta (or anywhere near by) yet it would appear.

Hmm, I suppose not...

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We're not sure yet. ;) Hopefully, we will have some answers regarding distribution this week (fingers crossed...)

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We're not sure yet. ;) Hopefully, we will have some answers regarding distribution this week (fingers crossed...)

OK, thanks! Definitely interested if I can find a source.

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Was mighty impressed by the '2 Cups of Blood' from Beta Cocktails:

3/4 oz Mezcal Vida

3/4 oz Suze (I used the Chartreuse Gentiane)

3/4 Punt e Mes

3/4 Bittermens Xocolatl Mole Bitters

Stirred & strained, garnished w/ grapefruit peel.

This confused the hell out of my mouth...at least for a couple sips. Several extremely intense flavors competing for ground, with the chocolate/spice of the bitters certainly at the forefront, but the smokiness of the mezcal and long lingering finish of the gentian were very pleasantly discernible. This was my first experience with the Bittermens Mole bitters, and going in I wouldn't have given them a shot at taming the powerful Suze + Mezcal, but they sure did. For as much as the recipe looks like a Clash of the Titans, it's a rather mellow, balanced concoction in the end.

How in the hell did I miss that drink? Time to do a little tinkering behind the bar with the new Bittermens Amère Sauvage Gentiane to see how it works in this cocktail. It's time for a night of inebriation in the name of research!

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We're not sure yet. ;) Hopefully, we will have some answers regarding distribution this week (fingers crossed...)

OK, thanks! Definitely interested if I can find a source.

So, the good news is that later this week, we'll be able to name a great online liquor store who ships to 46 states (sorry, TX, WV, NV and MA). For Nevada, our shipment to our distributor is heading out this week as we have received back our brand registration certificate from the state - and we should get clearance from Massachusetts to ship to our distributor there by next week at the latest. Any Texan bartenders out there have a recommendation for a good boutique distributor?


Edited by BittermensAG (log)

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Any time frame available yet for when the Bitterman spirits like Amère Nouvelle and Amère Sauvage might be available on an internet retailer like Drinkupny or similar? Not much access down here in Atlanta (or anywhere near by) yet it would appear.

So, good news! Our products are finally available through DrinkUpNY. Here's a copy of the press release:

Bittermens Spirits at DrinkUpNY

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Any time frame available yet for when the Bitterman spirits like Amère Nouvelle and Amère Sauvage might be available on an internet retailer like Drinkupny or similar? Not much access down here in Atlanta (or anywhere near by) yet it would appear.

So, good news! Our products are finally available through DrinkUpNY. Here's a copy of the press release:

Bittermens Spirits at DrinkUpNY

Oh sure! Now that they have dropped their free shipping policy to those of us out here in the sticks!

:laugh:

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Suze was supposed to be imported into the U.S. in 2010 and has been spotted in liquor stores in New Orleans that year (the group of people I stayed with for Tales that year bought a bottle as they stocked the bed&breakfast's bar).

I encountered it at this year's Tales. My wife and I were drinking at Iris and the bartender kindly offered me a taste of it. It is truly unique; I'd love to get a hold of some eventually.

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Suze was supposed to be imported into the U.S. in 2010 and has been spotted in liquor stores in New Orleans that year (the group of people I stayed with for Tales that year bought a bottle as they stocked the bed&breakfast's bar).

I encountered it at this year's Tales. My wife and I were drinking at Iris and the bartender kindly offered me a taste of it. It is truly unique; I'd love to get a hold of some eventually.

Time for a trip to Montreal!

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Suze was supposed to be imported into the U.S. in 2010 and has been spotted in liquor stores in New Orleans that year (the group of people I stayed with for Tales that year bought a bottle as they stocked the bed&breakfast's bar).

I encountered it at this year's Tales. My wife and I were drinking at Iris and the bartender kindly offered me a taste of it. It is truly unique; I'd love to get a hold of some eventually.

Time for a trip to Montreal!

I've got a friend in Montreal right now - he texted me to say he couldn't find the Suze. Damn!

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Suze was supposed to be imported into the U.S. in 2010 and has been spotted in liquor stores in New Orleans that year (the group of people I stayed with for Tales that year bought a bottle as they stocked the bed&breakfast's bar).

I encountered it at this year's Tales. My wife and I were drinking at Iris and the bartender kindly offered me a taste of it. It is truly unique; I'd love to get a hold of some eventually.

Time for a trip to Montreal!

I've got a friend in Montreal right now - he texted me to say he couldn't find the Suze. Damn!

From the SAQ's website, it looks like the only store that has it in downtown Montreal right now is the Signature store on Saint Catherine. If he's still there, he might give it a try!

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From the SAQ's website, it looks like the only store that has it in downtown Montreal right now is the Signature store on Saint Catherine. If he's still there, he might give it a try!

The Montreal SAQ Signature store is awesome for weird and rare spirits, along with the limited release and greater aged expressions of more common brands. I scored some Combier cocoa eaux-de-vie a couple years ago.

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A couple of rogue/beta cocktails last night.

The Start and Finish

I am not sure I liked that one. I used 1/4 oz pastis instead of 1/2 oz absinthe because I don't have absinthe (and don't love it in large amounts). It was a little too "all over the place" for me, with strong - and not always harmonious - herbal flavors introduced by the vermouth, lillet, averna, with a strong anise finish.

6824479401_aaef034dc0_z.jpg

Burned popcorn

This one is very good, with flavors from the flamed orange peels and aged rum playing well with the bourbon.

6824488479_ecc1ecf04e_z.jpg

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The Search for Delicious

6948087817_6b961829e1_z.jpg

It's interesting how the salt changes the taste of the Cynar. I like it a lot.

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I made the Warning Label tonight: Demerara rum 151, Cynar, Punt e Mes, orange bitters, grapefruit bitters (made by a friend), Campari rinse, lemon twist.

It is a well balanced cocktail, quite bitter as expected but the 151 helps tone it down somewhat with some caramel notes. You can smell and taste the grapefruit at the end with the Campari/grapefruit bitters combo. I feel it is a little on the syrupy side. Its flavor is very typical of most cocktails in the book.

7007398837_cd90e1facf_z.jpg

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I haven't made the Warning Label as written because I just recently acquired LH151. I used Smith & Cross and it was wonderful (if a bit sweet). Another KC user suggested half S&C and half LH151.

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Finally - finally - got around to making a Broken Shoe Shiner tonight. Magical drink. Rosewater and pastis... who knew?

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The Start and Finish

I am not sure I liked that one. I used 1/4 oz pastis instead of 1/2 oz absinthe because I don't have absinthe (and don't love it in large amounts). It was a little too "all over the place" for me, with strong - and not always harmonious - herbal flavors introduced by the vermouth, lillet, averna, with a strong anise finish.

Tried this one the other day, for the first sip or two I agree with the "all over the place" assessment but as the ice melts it came together for me. It sounds counter-intuitive, but once the drink mellows just a bit the hefty amount of absinthe is actually beneficial by serving as a dominant flavor for the other ingredients to complement and transform (not to mention giving a little backbone via the high proof). I could see a smaller amount of pastis just muddying the waters further.


Edited by sbumgarner (log)

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