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KD1191

Rogue (now beta) Cocktails

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Racketeer (Stephen Cole) with Rittenhouse rye, Vida mezcal, Punt e Mes, Benedictine, yellow Chartreuse, Peychaud's bitters, Laphroaig. I went full Punt e Mes for the vermouth since someone had commented on Kindred that it was too sweet with the Carpano Antica specified in the original recipe.

 

It's Manhattan-ish with a double dose of smoke.

 

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Fernet sling, subbing in D&C's house vermouth (1:1 Dolin:Punt) for Carpano. 'Cos I ain't paying $65 for a bottle of vermouth. Interesting observation about the weird soda flavour from a weird country in the comment. Makes me wish this came in cans.

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Little Secrets (Brad Bolt) with El Dorado 5, El Dorado high strength (Plantation overproof), lime juice, St Germain, rhubarb bitters (cherry bark vanilla bitters). It really needs the 7 drops of bitters to cut through all the other ingredients. It's an interesting take on the Daiquiri.

 

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I finished my bottle of Campari with Maks' Campari "Martini" - Campari and salt tincture, orange twist. It's a really nice way to enjoy Campari, and a great demonstration of what salt can do in cocktails.

 

 

Campari "Martini" (Maks Pazuniak @maks_p) with Campari and salt tincture #betacocktails

 

 


Edited by FrogPrincesse fix broken picture (log)
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I finished my bottle of Campari with Maks' Campari "Martini" - Campari and salt tincture, orange twist. It's a really nice way to enjoy Campari, and a great demonstration of what salt can do in cocktails.

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I just mixed a Havana Club-powered Art of the Choke. A lovely drink.

 

2 Cups of Blood. This drink is completely mental. Equal parts mole bitters, Suze, Punt e Mes and Del Maguey Vida jacked with orange bitters and agave syrup. Drinking this with a cold/blocked nose is unsettling.

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I just mixed a Havana Club-powered Art of the Choke. A lovely drink.

I thought for a second that you had gone to the dark side and made a powdered Art of Choke.

 

2 Cups of Blood. This drink is completely mental. Equal parts mole bitters, Suze, Punt e Mes and Del Maguey Vida jacked with orange bitters and agave syrup. Drinking this with a cold/blocked nose is unsettling.

Love the bitterness and metallic notes of that one. What did it taste like with a blocked nose?

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I thought for a second that you had gone to the dark side and made a powdered Art of Choke.

 

Love the bitterness and metallic notes of that one. What did it taste like with a blocked nose?

 

Nothing but bitter. I noticed that I hadn't posted about the drink in this thread before--when I make something from the book I do a quick search in this thread to see if I've had it before/what I thought of it--but I'm sure I had it before. Sure of it. Sure I liked it, even. Guess I didn't post or, if I did, posted elsewhere. But with a cold all you get is bitter. None of the metallic notes. None of the 'balance' that the drink actually has. You may as well be downing mole bitters straight. 

 

EDIT

 

Trans-Europe Express. Equal parts yellow Chartreuse, Macallan Glenfarclas 25, Punt e Mes and Campari with a couple dashes of bitters (Peychaud's and Regan's orange) and a green Chartreuse rinse. I find it somewhat endearing that Chartreuse can knock the shit out of assertive ingredients like Campari, Punt e Mes and the whisky.

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Nana Ester: 1.5 oz Shiraz, a half ounce of Poitin, three quarters of an ounce of lemon juice, a half ounce of simple and five drops of orange blossom water. Big and bold cheap Shiraz gets beaten into submission by moonshine. Not bad but you could hardly session these bad girls the way you could say, Silences or Times. Fruity. Moonshineynailpolishremovery. Citrus, yeah, obviously. 

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Nana Ester: 1.5 oz Shiraz, a half ounce of Poitin, three quarters of an ounce of lemon juice, a half ounce of simple and five drops of orange blossom water. Big and bold cheap Shiraz gets beaten into submission by moonshine. Not bad but you could hardly session these bad girls the way you could say, Silences or Times. Fruity. Moonshineynailpolishremovery. Citrus, yeah, obviously. 

 

Swap brandy for the Poitin, throw in some fruit and call it sangria. Might be drinkable then.

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Trans-Europe Express. Equal parts yellow Chartreuse, Macallan Glenfarclas 25, Punt e Mes and Campari with a couple dashes of bitters (Peychaud's and Regan's orange) and a green Chartreuse rinse. I find it somewhat endearing that Chartreuse can knock the shit out of assertive ingredients like Campari, Punt e Mes and the whisky.

 

Thanks for this one.  We liked it sufficiently that I've added it to Kindred (by way of Cocktail Virgin Slut).

 

Not sure I'd want to use a single malt in it, though.

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I had a vague recollection of there being a few Nardini drinks in beta cocktails, so I flipped back and forth until I found the Infernal Architect. Surprisingly tolerable for a drink that brings together four unlikely ingredients, one of which is that bull-in-a-china-shop, Strega.

 

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Delighted to hear you finally found some decent sherry and the Teenage Riot is a great place to start! Might be fun to play with a few different sherries to see what works best. I have pretty consistently used the Lustau Los Arcos Amontillado to good result. Probably not quite as dry as the Fino with a hint of raisin-y sweetness. 

 

 

I second that.  The Teenage Riot is a stunningly good drink, and I'm sure I can taste the Amontillado as one of the (many) flavours.  But then I haven't tried it with a fino.

 

Agreed! It's as great drink, even better with amontillado sherry.

 

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Teenage Riot (Tonia Guffey) with Cynar, Rittenhouse rye, Noilly Prat extra dry vermouth, Lustau dry amontillado sherry, Regan's orange bitters.

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Has Eeyore's Requiem really never been mentioned on this thread? How odd. Or maybe the new search function is out of whack... Who knows. Anyway, here it is. All bitter things together create this beautiful thing.

 

Eeyore's Requiem (Toby Maloney) with Campari, Tanqueray gin, Cynar, Fernet-Branca, Dolin blanc vermouth, Fee/Regan/Angostura orange bitters, expressed orange peel (x3)

 

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I tried this one a few months ago and I actually found it more sweet than bitter in spite of all this bitter ingredients. What about you?

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@ananth I may not be a very good judge because I am so used to bitterness by now. 

So this is slightly sweet from the Campari, but I didn't feel that it was overly sweet. It was bitter but felt balanced overall. I thought it was a great drink. I got into the "zone" as soon as I had the first sip, which is usually a good sign. Everything seemed to really come well together.

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It's been mentioned in several other topcs, if not this one - vermouth generally, blanco vermouth, and Kerry and Anna have had a few on Manitoulin.

 

But it's a damn good drink and should be mentioned everywhere.  Maybe the Drinks topic next?

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I can't recall all of the places it's been mentioned... but it's definitely been mentioned. It's a personal favorite and I haven't had one in quite a while. Maybe I should remedy that soon.

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I am aware it's been mentioned elsewhere... I was just surprised it hadn't been mentioned here, of all places!

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