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Room temperature storage


Jossa
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Hello,

I'm having a bit of a crisis, someone has asked me (on very short notice!) to make a three tiered wedding cake. I've decided on white chocolate mud cake but, I need a filling that will hold up at room temp without going off. I will need to fondant the cakes and let them dry out for about 5-7 days before the wedding so I won't be able to refrigerate them once iced!

I've thought of using chocolate ganache but I'm still iffy on leaving it out in the air for longer than a day.

I've also looked for ready made bagged fillings but can't seem to get them here in the UK.

Can anyone out there PLEASE help me!!!

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Sleeved filling? Yuck! Too many ingredients, not enough fruit.

Check your PM's.

Theresa :biggrin:

"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power."

- Abraham Lincoln

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Sleeved filling?  Yuck!  Too many ingredients, not enough fruit.

Check your PM's.

Theresa :biggrin:

Hi Theresa!

Thankyou so much!

I was a bit worried about shop bought filling too! I'm a bit old fashioned that way and you really never know what's in them.

I think I'll go for the first raspberry recipe, it's very similar to the blueberry sauce I use for Italian trifle so I should be able to do it with out to much problem!!

Will this stand up to being out of the fridge? that is my biggest problem!! :biggrin:

Edited by Jossa (log)
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Hello,

I'm having a bit of a crisis, someone has asked me (on very short notice!) to make a three tiered wedding cake. I've decided on white chocolate mud cake but, I need a filling that will hold up at room temp without going off. I will need to fondant the cakes and let them dry out for about 5-7 days before the wedding so I won't be able to refrigerate them once iced!

I've thought of using chocolate ganache but I'm still iffy on leaving it out in the air for longer than a day.

I've also looked for ready made bagged fillings but can't seem to get them here in the UK.

Can anyone out there PLEASE help me!!!

I have refrigerated fondant-covered cakes, no problem. Just try to avoid bringing them straight out of the fridge into hot climates; airconditioned room is best.

"I'll just die if I don't get this recipe."
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Hello,

I'm having a bit of a crisis, someone has asked me (on very short notice!) to make a three tiered wedding cake. I've decided on white chocolate mud cake but, I need a filling that will hold up at room temp without going off. I will need to fondant the cakes and let them dry out for about 5-7 days before the wedding so I won't be able to refrigerate them once iced!

I've thought of using chocolate ganache but I'm still iffy on leaving it out in the air for longer than a day.

I've also looked for ready made bagged fillings but can't seem to get them here in the UK.

Can anyone out there PLEASE help me!!!

I have refrigerated fondant-covered cakes, no problem. Just try to avoid bringing them straight out of the fridge into hot climates; airconditioned room is best.

Do you just wrap them tight in clingfilm? Are they ok for a few days? Thanks for the advise!

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:blink: Wait.

You mean you're going to split, fill and cover the cakes with fondant, and let them sit out at room temp for 5-7 days before the event. Why?

I've never heard about that. Fill me in.

The fondant needs to dry out and also I need (inbetween a full time job!) to decorate the cakes. They are not stacked but are separate on a floating stand and the bride wants lots of detail! I usually only work with fruit cakes on this scale so you can imagine I'm totally in the dark and trying to find the best route.

The trouble is she was let down by her cake maker and approached me two weeks ago as she's seen other cakes I've done, her wedding is in August. I though chocolate mud cake would be the easiest as I know it freezes well and tend to taste better after defrosting. The only thing is they don't tend to be as deep as a fruit cake and I'm concerned that if I don't split and fill them they will look flat. I know they will be OK glazed and iced for a week but the idea of filling them is filling me with dread!!!

I may just try to double the mixture and make deeper cakes.........but then I have the worry of timings and burnt out side of the cake!!

Edited by Jossa (log)
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Don't know a thing about fondant, but a "mud cake" doesn't sound easy to split and fill.

Since this is last minute and it sounds like you don't have a lot of time, do what you can do and let the bride know this is what you can give her. If you can't do the level of detail without serving week-old cake that you are uncertain about, convince her she needs less detail. Take control!

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Don't know a thing about fondant, but a "mud cake" doesn't sound easy to split and fill. 

Since this is last minute and it sounds like you don't have a lot of time, do what you can do and let the bride know this is what you can give her.  If you can't do the level of detail without serving week-old cake that you are uncertain about, convince her she needs less detail.  Take control!

:laugh: I may be cutting my losses here and just make a rub through fruit cake that I can just marzipan and ice......and be damd with it!! :laugh:

By the by, Mud cake comes out like a rich sponge, it's really very nice if you want the recipe I'll happily post it.

Edited by Jossa (log)
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Italian buttercream holds up at room temp for a few days because the eggs are cooked while the icing is made. You may, however, have problems if the layers of the cake push the air out of the icing -might cause fondant to bubble.

I heard Colette Peters speak of refrigerating cakes covered in fondant with clingfilm wrapped on them tightly. I have not done this myself, so I don't know if there are any other tricks to it.

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Lisa, thanks for the photo of the pietra dura technique - I couldn't tell what the ivory was in the first photo - and it certainly didn't look like an inlaid design but you never know!

Jossa, I would love to see a recipe for mud cake; I hear it is the choice for Australian wedding cakes but have never made it, or seen a recipe for it. I know there are a lot of flavor variations on it, as well.

I have a very humid walk in cooler; I can hold a fondant covered cake overnight but that's it. It has to be well wrapped - either with a bun bag or in a box and that in a bun bag but it still develops condensation. Were I to leave it uncovered, I'm sure all the fondant would melt away! Home refrigerators may be far less humid, but you can't go far wrong with putting the fondant covered cake into a box, and then wrapping that with plastic wrap.

You might even check out Squires Kitchen (www.squires-shop.com) to see if they do ready made fruitcake - maybe even Jane Asher might have something ready made available as well.

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Do you just wrap them tight in clingfilm? Are they ok for a few days? Thanks for the advise!

You can put them in a big brand new plastic bag (such as bin liners); I usually inflate it so that the plastic bag is not touching the surface as much as possible (in case condensation forms). I put it in a domestic refrigerator and it is fine for days. Remember the key thing is that it comes out into a cool-ish environment ; ie, not right into a hot summers outdoor party. Even on the occasions when a bit of condensation forms on the surface due to hot weather, it usually evaporates soon enough. Best bet is you experiment with putting a bit of fondant into the fridge and observe the results.

"I'll just die if I don't get this recipe."
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I think I may have cracked it!

Thankyou for all your advice I may not have got there without it!! Think of the solution not the problem...... :rolleyes:

I have doubled the mixture, turned the oven down and made the greaseproof 2 inches highr, when the cake has started to colour I put a double thickness of foil on top, it seems to have worked...so far the second cake is in and baking, only time will tell but it's 1am now and I have at least 1 and 1/2 hours to go!!!

The recipie I use is as follows:

For a 17cm round tin

15cm square

17cm octagonal

165g unsalted butter

100g

white chocolate ( I use belgian white)

1 1/3 cups caster sugar (mine are 250ml)

2/3 cup of milk

1 cup plain flour

1/3 cup self raising flour

1/2 teaspoon vanilla essence ( although I use extract)

1 egg

Baking time1 3/4 hour on moderate slow oven, 160c, 325f,gas mark 3.

1) Grease and line baseand sides of cake tin with grease proof paperbringing paper 5cm above top of tin

2)melt chopped chocolate, chopped butter, milk and sugar in a saucepan over a low heat untill melted and combined

3)transfer mixture into bowl and cool for 15 minutes

4) gradualy add sifted flours, lightly beaten egg and essence. Pour into pan and bake for 1 3/4 hours or untill knife comes out clean

If the cake starts to brown quickly cover with foil, the cake will get a thick sugary crust on top during baking.

Cool in tin then turn out onto rack.

The cake will keep uniced for 1 week in an airtight cotainer or well wrapped and frozen for 3 months.

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Hi Jossa,

Thank you for posting the white chocolate mud cake recipe. I have always wanted to make one. I have tried a few recipes from the internet, but they did not come out very well. Do you also have a recipe for a dark chocolate version or can we just substitute dark chocolate or unsweetened for the white chocolate? Are the tins that you bake in very heavy or would a regular cake pan work ok?

I would also like to know why you let the fondant dry out? Here in the U.S. we just cover with fondant the same day the cake is served. Does drying have a special purpose? Also I would love to see a photo of your finished cake when it is done.

Thanks

check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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Hi Jossa,

Thank you for posting the white chocolate mud cake recipe.  I have always wanted to make one.  I have tried a few recipes from the internet, but they did not come out very well.  Do you also have a recipe for a dark chocolate version or can we just substitute dark chocolate  or unsweetened for the white chocolate?  Are the tins that you bake in very heavy or would a regular cake pan work ok?  

I would also like to know why you let the fondant dry out?  Here in the U.S. we just cover with fondant the same day the cake is served.  Does drying have a special purpose?  Also I would love to see a photo of your finished cake when it is done. 

Thanks

Hi, Your welcome! The recipe is very easy and the only advice I can give you for it to be successful is to add the flour slowly to the chocolate mixture and stir it in thoroughly a bit at a time, it stops the flour from going lumpy but takes a bit of elbow grease!! I add the eggs last after I've mixed everything else together.

The dark chocolate recipe is below:

I use regular cake pans that are spring loaded and alway line then with a folded upper edge.

17cm round

15cm square

17cm Octagonal

306g dark chocolate

225g unsalted butter

1tbs dry instant coffee

3/4 cup of water

3/4 brown sugar (firmly packed into measuring cup)

1 cup plain flour

1/4 cup self raising flour

2 eggs

1/4 cup coffee liqueur (I use Tia maria)

Baking time 2 hours

1) Grease and line base and sides of cake tin with grease proof paper bringing paper 5cm above top of tin

2)melt chopped chocolate, chopped butter, coffee, water and sugar in a saucepan over a low heat until melted and combined, transfer mixture into bowl and cool for 15 minutes

3)gradually add sifted flours, lightly beaten egg and Liqueur. Pour into pan and bake for 2 hours or until knife comes out clean.

If the cake starts to go dark and crusty to quickly cover with foil, the cake will get a thick sugary crust on top during baking.

Keeps the same as the white chocolate cake.

I've managed to bake all three of the cakes I need with a great result! I have managed to get them 3 inches thick by making enough mixture for a 20cm tin but using a 15cm tin! The same with the other sizes. So fingers crossed!!

I'll be sure to put a photo on when they are done!

I always let my cakes dry out for at least 24 hours especially if I have coloured the fondant. It tends to go very sticky and as I use a little vegetable fat to stop it from drying out while working with it, the drying time helps this to absorb. It's just the way my mother always taught me! I'm not sure it there is a difference between English and American fondant but If you eat a cake with newly iced fondant on it tends to be very stick and not hold up very well. While if it's left to rest it hardens slightly and cuts better. :smile:

Edited by Jossa (log)
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