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Roadtrip dining for Amsterdam visitors


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Well, we were supposed to head to the German Alps this fall, but one night last week we looked at eachother and said ´don´t we really want to take another US trip instead?´ and before we knew it, had booked plane tickets to Washington, DC.

A some of you may know, eGullet and eGulleters played a major part in 2 of our previous US trips (see here for the Southwest trip report and here for British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest). So I need your help again.. especially because, while I usually take about 4 months to plan a trip like this, I now only have 8 weeks :shock: .

I´ll ask questions about the Washington DC/Virginia/South part of the trip on the appropriate boards, but here I´d like your help for the Pennsylvania part.

We´ll be arriving in Philadelphia late on Sunday September 6, and will leave on Wednesday. From Philadelphia we´ll head west through Pennsylvania Dutch Country, probably pass through Lancaster, York and Gettysburg, before heading south towards Shenandoah.

I will be perusing the boards.. but I´d love to hear suggestions from you. What´s uniquely Philadelphian that foodloving Europeans have to try? Cheesesteak, I guess? Where´s the best? What´s absolutely not to miss in the 2 days we will be there?

Any thoughts on food on route from Philadelphia to Shenandoah? We´re willing to make detours for great food and must-sees.

All your help is greatly appreciated.

edited, because apparently, it´s very hard to type 'Philadelphia' :wink:

Edited by Chufi (log)
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Chufi,

So excited that you are finally visiting Philadelphia. You probably already figured out that Reading Terminal Market and the Italian Market should be high on your list of places to visit and sample food from.

PM me the dates of your visit and let me know if you need a not-so-knowledgeable guide to take you to Pa Dutch/Amish plces like this.

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In the Gettysburg area, I suggest Sidney(East Berlin) and Pomona's(Biglerville). I mentioned each of them on a topic a couple of weeks ago and I would attach a link here if I had the know-how. I'll work on that skill as soon as I master the arts of tying my shoes and taking out the trash. Anyway, the topic title was "The Lodge at Blue Ridge Summit" and the last activity in it was June 27.

If you don't spend all of your time at the battlefield, a drive through orchard country--e.g., Biglerville, Bendersville, Arendtsville, Cashtown, Orrtanna--taking any backroad that looks interesting would be well worth your time. You'll likely run across some nice fruit for sale and you are sure to enjoy the scenery.

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Oh, wonderful! You'll have a great visit. A possible itinerary:

Monday AM: breakfast or brunch at Famous Fourth Street Deli (knish, bialy, bagel, anything with corned beef)

Monday midday: wander through the Italian Market (don't miss a hoagie at Sarcone's)

Monday night: $45 prix fixe dinner at Matyson (BYO)

Tuesday AM: pancakes in Reading Terminal Market at the Dutch Eating Place

Tuesday midday: continue at RTM: roast pork at DiNic's

Tuesday afternoon: nibble on cheese and sip beer at Tria

Tuesday night: oysters et al @ The Oyster House

Two things you definitely can't get in DC are good deli food and the BYO scene, so those are good to focus on here. They don't have anything like the Oyster House or Reading Terminal Market either. They do have excellent wine bars, casual Italian, high-end tasting menus (if you can get to Komi, you should), and lots else to choose from.

You're going to have a wonderful trip!

Cooking and writing and writing about cooking at the SIMMER blog

Pop culture commentary at Intrepid Media

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Monday midday: wander through the Italian Market (don't miss a hoagie at Sarcone's)

Alas, much of the Italian Market is closed on Monday. You could switch markets and do Reading Terminal on Monday and the Italian Market on Tuesday.

I'd also suggest Carman's Country Kitchen for Monday breakfast in lieu of Famous 4th Street.

I will be scorned - but for cheesesteaks do the taste off between Pat's and Geno's at 9th and Passyunk just south of the Italian Market.

Edited by Holly Moore (log)

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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Alas, much of the Italian Market is closed on Monday.

Good point, and good catch, Holly.

Come to think of it, some of the RTM merchants will be closed on Monday too, particularly the Amish stands. There'll still be plenty to do and see and eat, but check ahead.

Cooking and writing and writing about cooking at the SIMMER blog

Pop culture commentary at Intrepid Media

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Alas, much of the Italian Market is closed on Monday.

Good point, and good catch, Holly.

Come to think of it, some of the RTM merchants will be closed on Monday too, particularly the Amish stands. There'll still be plenty to do and see and eat, but check ahead.

Good thought about the Amish stands at RTM, but then, if their itinerary still includes Lancaster, they don't really need to get an Amish fix in Philly.

But the general Monday-closed thing is worth keeping an eye on, it's by no means universal, there are plenty of places open on mondays, but it's always worth checking if it's something important.

For instance, sampling a tasting menu at Matyson is a great idea for exemplifying the Philly BYOB thing, but there's a catch: although Matyson is open on mondays, they only offer the tasting menu tues-thurs.

So, Chufi, as you get closer, you might want to post a tentative plan and perhaps we can save you some time by checking for any logistical problems like closed-on-monday, or suggest improvements to the flow, based on proximity, etc.

There's really WAY too much to do in two days, so, after scanning through the threads, what looks especially good to you? We can probably narrow it down for you!

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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I will be scorned  - but for cheesesteaks do the taste off between Pat's and Geno's at 9th and Passyunk just south of the Italian Market.

No reason for scorn.

If you do this at 3am, you'll be happy.

If you do this at 3pm, you'll wonder why cheesesteaks have such a buzz.

Charlie, the Main Line Mummer

We must eat; we should eat well.

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  • 1 month later...

Good thought about the Amish stands at RTM, but then, if their itinerary still includes Lancaster, they don't really need to get an Amish fix in Philly.

and where in Lancaster, or vicinity, is the best place to get that Amish fix?

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Good thought about the Amish stands at RTM, but then, if their itinerary still includes Lancaster, they don't really need to get an Amish fix in Philly.

and where in Lancaster, or vicinity, is the best place to get that Amish fix?

If you take some back roads (Rt 340 West to Lancaster), you will pass Intercourse and Bird-in-hand, where you will find the Amish Barn and other similar places such as Plain & Fancy and Hershey Farm (not to be confused with Hershey Park).

ETA : A little more planning and you might be able to get an Authentic Amish Homecooked Meal.

Another PA Dutch Resource.

Note: Don't be surprised by how commercialized some Amish places can be. It seems like the Amish have more websites than most local businesses :raz:

Edited by percyn (log)
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Note: Don't be surprised by how commercialized some Amish places can be. It seems like the Amish have more websites than most local businesses :raz:

So much for the famed Amish disdain for modern technology, I guess!

Somehow, I managed to miss all of this over the last two months. Chufi: If you actually can read posts while you're here, PM me and I'll send you a phone number. I greatly enjoy meeting visitors and showing this place off, as you might recall from my first foodblog. Hope you're enjoying your visit! I trust you will hit the RTM sometime today; if so, do get a hold of me - I live two blocks away.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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jm chen pretty much nailed the Tuesday itinerary. I met Chufi and her hubby for that glass of wine at Tria after working lunch shift today and then dropped them back off at Oyster House in the capable hands of my cohorts behind the bar. I believe the Roast Pork sammie was had as well. Seems like they're having fun and it was a pleasure to meet them, even just for a short while. Wish I could join them for the rest of their trip. Looks like there's much fun in store...

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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  • 4 weeks later...

Time for a little write up! We had a fabulous time on our trip. Most of it was spent in Virginia and North Carolina, but we did spend some time in Philly and PA.

We loved Philadelphia, what a great city to just wander around in. The first day we went to the museum for hours, and had lunch in the cafetaria there. Nothing special but not bad. That night we had dinner at Amada, which was fantastic. We had a Spanish Viognier that was the best wine we tasted on the whole trip, and a wonderful dinner of little dishes that were all equally delicious. After dinner we went to the brewpub next door (sorry, the name escapes me) for a nightcap.. we always love going to American brewpubs, seems they always have a nice atmospehere and pretty good beer (and often, pretty good food too).

The next day we went to Reading Terminal market. It was a Tuesday so the Amish stands were closed, but we had a sandwich at Di Nic's (rooast pork/cheddar/provolone - it's so nice when you don't have to think about what to order because people on eGullet told you what to do!) and loved it. We also bought some cookies from the Famous 4th street Cookie Co.

Late in the afternoon we met Katie Loeb for drinks and spirited conversation at Tria, which was a very nice place with a terrific beer selection. The food looked good too but we had plans for Oyster House!

Katie delivered us to OH in time for dinner. We had oysters, raw and fried, mussels with chorizo, shoestring fries, a cocktail too many ;) and a really good time!

The next day we drove trhough PA Dutch country which was beautiful, and a very relaxing drive after 3 days in the city. We stayed in York, PA that night and a a nice, if a bit underwhelming, pub dinner at the White Rose bar and Gille there.

The next day we had lunch at eGulleter Lori in PA's house.. tomatoes from the garden, chicken salad, ice tea, and a lovely pound cake with raspberry coulis and cream! It was wonderful to sit at a kitchen table, in a real home, and meet Lori and her sons.

That wraps up the Pennsylvania part of the trip.. more to come in other regional forums, soon.

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