Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Favorite method for baked potato fries/wedges


infernooo
 Share

Recommended Posts

I also make oven fries and keep it simple

line sheet pan with parchment paper. Cut, rinse and dry potatoes. I use what ever potato I have on hand. Russets are best but Yukon golds aren't too bad.

Coat in evoo and toss. Maybe add a little garlic powder, black pepper and paprika. Some times salt before cooking, sometimes after. Into a 400 oven. I find convection causes premature browning and burning since there is inadequate shielding of the fan in my ovens. I will often kick on the convection for a short while then switch back to bake. Cook till golden brown 35-40 min.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although I often roast potato wedges simply by coating them with olive oil, salt and pepper, there's another method I sometimes use which has its own special pleasures.

Put potato wedges into a pan with at least 1-inch sides. Grease the bottom first. Put wedges in and then pour in water to about halfway cover the wedges. Dot generously with butter and sprinkle salt over all. Start at 450 degrees for 20 minutes, then turn down to 375, and just keep watching them... when they have attained the degree of brownness you like, they're done.

This yields wedges that are very soft on the inside and very crispy on the outside. That's not always what you want for oven fries, but like I said, these are special in their own way.

Jenny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Put potato wedges into a pan with at least 1-inch sides. Grease the bottom first.  Put wedges in and then pour in water to about halfway cover the wedges.  Dot generously with butter and sprinkle salt over all.  Start at 450 degrees for 20 minutes, then turn down to 375, and just keep watching them... when they have attained the degree of brownness you like, they're done.

This reminds me of a recipe from Barbara Kafka's Roasting cookbook, except she uses chicken stock and then drizzles them with butter or chicken fat to finish. I don't really think of them as oven fries, but they are fabulous.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's my method (I just made these last night, actually, and had great results)-

Preheat the oven to 375 with the roasting pan inside the oven. Cut russet potatoes into 1/8 wedges, place in a large bowl and toss with seasonings (usually just salt, pepper, rosemary) and oil. When the oven (and roasting pan) are ready lightly film the bottom with oil and add the potatoes in a single layer. About 3/4 through the cooking process turn the oven up to 425 and flip the potatoes to finish them off.

I prefer the texture of potatoes cooked directly on the pan, as opposed to on foil or parchment, and starting them in a hot pan really tends to prevent a lot of sticking issues.

aka Michael

Chi mangia bene, vive bene!

"...And bring us the finest food you've got, stuffed with the second finest."

"Excellent, sir. Lobster stuffed with tacos."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I cooked potato wedges last night and this is what I used.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees:

I used 1 Yukon Gold and 1 red pototo

I sliced them into wedges then I salt and peppered them and added garlic powder as well. I then put them in a bowl and added the EVOO and tossed the potatoes to make sure all were coated.

Prior to placing them on the cooking sheet I sprayed the sheet with Mazzola cooking spray.

I placed them on the cookie sheet and put in the oven for exactly 30 minutes. Half way thur I turned them on the other side. They come out crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. YUMMY!!

Rena

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use redskin potatos, small enough to be cut in quarters; leave the skin on. Toss in a bowl with olive oil, seasoned salt and rosemary; pour out onto a lipped cookie sheet lined with foil and turn so skin side is down. Roast at 400 until golden brown. These yield a crunchy inside, and a creamy, slightly sweet inside if you're using new potatos, as I did the last time.

I also do sweet potato wedges the same way, except I peel the potatos, cut the heat down to 325, and toss with olive oil, a little sugar, lots of Hungarian paprika and enough cayenne to warm it up. Those you have to turn once or twice. They roast in about 25 minutes or so.

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Does anyone else find that the pan makes a big difference? I have a matte black enameled cast iron Le Creuset gratin pan that I use for oven fries-- it gives the best crust. I use small red potatoes, so my oven fries are usually chunks rather than planks. Toss with olive oil and kosher salt, roast at about 375.

Great topic-- I have my mise en place ready for home-made ketchup for tomorrow AM, so this is great inspiration for something to eat with the ketchup.

Jen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jenny, that sounds really interesting! The water threw me, i can't work out how that ends up making crispy potatoes, but I guess maybe it evaporates or something... in any case, sounds like something I'll have to try next time.

Exactly. The water evaporates, and the butter by then has coated each wedge (I think by magic or something...) and that's how the crispy coating forms. Don't skimp on the salt. I haven't made these in awhile, but I allow 1 to 1 1/2 hours in the oven.

Jenny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...