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Things that are a total waste of money


Fat Guy
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I don't think I'd care for LC for everyday top-of-stove stuff, but for braising in the oven, it's wonderful.

ITA. I love love love mine. I have a real LC one and also the Sam's knockoff and honestly I can't tell the difference. They both rock!

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I guess I have got a lot of stuff that many of you feel might be a total waste of money.

It all comes down to personal preference.

I do have a pot filler and I have a stockpot that has a spigot at the bottom and I use a pasta cooker that has a perforated insert (just like the one Jacques Pepin used today on his show) that allows me to lift out just the pasta (or dumplings, etc.) leaving the water behind to cool before I have to move the pot.

I have a fair amount of tile on the walls.  I do have some granite but I also have a lot of butcherblock and some stainless steel.  There is even a section of marble. 

I have lots of gadgets because I love to collect them. 

There is more than enough cookware for several kitchens - mainly because I also collect that stuff.  :rolleyes: 

I don't spend a lot of money on jewelry or clothes (shoes are another matter), expensive cars, cruises, spas, and etc.

I buy things that make me happy and which I plan on passing on to my offspring who are as nuts about cooking stuff as me.  :wub: 

Then there is the fact that if I ever fall on hard times, I can probably live quite comfortably on the sale of my collection of copper for at least a few years. :biggrin:

After that I can get into the other collections - the vintage toasters and the mixers which ought to carry me for a few more years.  And I have a vintage range that should help a bit. 

Assuming I can bring myself to part with any of them. :blink:

My kitchen is well-loved and well-used.  I do actually cook and bake in it and I am happy in it.  It's not a "just for show" kitchen and is beginning to show a little wear here and there but to me that shows that it has been serving its purpose.

That is exactly how I feel about MY kitchen. I love my kitchen. I know that there are things in it that others wouldn't need or want - but it's MINE lol. An example - I have two pull out trash bins - my designer told me I would be thankful one day. I thought, nope, I don't need that - well, with the size of my kitchen and the placement of them, I am really glad to have them - but to just see that/hear that sounds like a complete waste. I didnt' know until I had to WORK in my new kitchen how right she was.

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Ok, I have to write in favor of my glass range hood.  Our range is in an island, and the glass makes the hood less intrusive in the middle of the room.  It is not particularly hard to keep clean, and there is NO maid in this house (admittedly I'm not the most fastidious housekeeper either).  The biggest cleaning issue is dust on top, rather than splatter underneath, and it works like  a dream.

I am curious about the glass range hoods - I've never seen one. We also have our hood over our island and had the same concerns about something being this huge intrusive thing!

We opted for encasing our hood in wood - and I love it - LOVE it. I do wonder though what the glass ones look like. Do you have any pics?

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Mine are ones mentioned already:

1. Those weird funny sinks that are too small, too shallow, too narrow, oddly shaped so difficult to clean, etc.

2. Glass hoods

3. Electric small appliances such as can openers, juicers, etc.

4. Large enameled cast iron cookware. I have a small Le Crueset saucepan and frying pan that are already at the limit of what I can handle. I would need a crane to handle something like a dutch oven, which I know many love

On the granite argument. Here's a closeup of my granite countertops:

1409435118_0f55d244d7_m.jpg

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This thread just further explains why there is so much variety in cookware, kitchen gadgets and crap. To each his own.

I have a few All Clad pots that have served me very well over the years, no warping. You can, however, take every single piece of cookware (there aren't many gadgets, but fine, take those too) out of my apartment as long as you just leave me my Le Creuset dutch oven. By FAR my favorite kitchen thing. Makes me wonder if the haters have ever even used it.

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My favorite pot though is an Ikea non-stick wok that is well made, cheap and extremely versatile. I love it for cooking pasta of all things. It is from their top line.

Yes! I own the same pot and use it all the time -- it's great for pasta. And it cost,oh, eight bucks?

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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I'll have to attribute my relative lack of useless or inferior or poor value products to eGullet Society members. Reading and discussing others' cookware and kitchen appliance experiences over the last six or seven years has saved me something in the six figure range I am sure.

And put me in the enameled cast iron camp. I have lots of it in French ovens in all sizes and love it. Have a sauce pan, but don't use it much. Never saw any need for the skillets. And have a bunch of Sitram, much more cost effective than All-Clad, of which I have two small promo pieces.

On the other hand, if someone wants copper cookware or All-Clad or a high end oven or other kitchen design element as a matter of interior design rather than to cook with, who am I to object or care. May even help on resale of a house, so I can't even say it's a waste of money.

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I got my AC pieces years ago (from a mail order galaxy far, far away) and I'm happy with them - with the exception of the nonstick skillet (and a non-stick 2 Qt. saute pan gift). The nonstick didn't hold up.

A sales associate at WS asked if I'd cleaned them with Dawn and I had. She said Dawn not only cuts grease, it screws with the nonstick coating. I use the rest of my pieces, love my 2 LC dutch ovens and my cheapo nonstick skillets (thanks, Costco) which can be replaced when the insides give out.

Based on actual use, I admit my juicer and espresso maker may not have been the best purchases. But like others, I got those a long, long time ago.

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I got my AC pieces years ago (from a mail order galaxy far, far away) and I'm happy with them - with the exception of the nonstick skillet (and a non-stick 2 Qt. saute pan gift). The nonstick didn't hold up.

A sales associate at WS asked if I'd cleaned them with Dawn and I had. She said Dawn not only cuts grease, it screws with the nonstick coating. I use the rest of my pieces, love my 2 LC dutch ovens and my cheapo nonstick skillets (thanks, Costco) which can be replaced when the insides give out.

I agree with Dave. Take 'em back and ask for the manager if you get that story again. I don't think there's a Dawn Disclaimer when you buy them.

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. . . .

A sales associate at WS asked if I'd cleaned them with Dawn and I had. She said Dawn not only cuts grease, it screws with the nonstick coating.

. . . .

This is nonsense.

I wondered about that. I use Dawn dish soap all the time on my AC non stick and have for several years. I haven't noticed a problem.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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. . . .

A sales associate at WS asked if I'd cleaned them with Dawn and I had. She said Dawn not only cuts grease, it screws with the nonstick coating.

. . . .

This is nonsense.

Freakin hilarious. Dawn is a standard cleaner.

I have a bastard bunch of pots and pans, Mauviel through Ikea. (Not bad.) My recent faves have been from Target and TJMaxx. Stainless steel with the stacked booties, glass lid, cheap and versatile. A pan doesn't make a cook.

Those stupid gizmos for veining shrimp: Not worth the three bucks thay ask for them. Use your fingers.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Those stupid gizmos for veining shrimp: Not worth the three bucks thay ask for them. Use your fingers.

I presume you mean de-veining shrimp. Veining shrimp sounds like a truly tedious and thankless task, seeing as how they need to be de-veined again before you eat them. :raz:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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. . . .

A sales associate at WS asked if I'd cleaned them with Dawn and I had. She said Dawn not only cuts grease, it screws with the nonstick coating.

. . . .

This is nonsense.

Freakin hilarious. Dawn is a standard cleaner.

I have a bastard bunch of pots and pans, Mauviel through Ikea. (Not bad.) My recent faves have been from Target and TJMaxx. Stainless steel with the stacked booties, glass lid, cheap and versatile. A pan doesn't make a cook.

Those stupid gizmos for veining shrimp: Not worth the three bucks thay ask for them. Use your fingers.

Actually, Dawn is a brand name for a whole line of cleaners. Their Power Dissolver will mess up your teflon and finger tips.

"Dawn Power Dissolver is not intended for use on copper pots, varnished or painted wood, appliance lettering, scratched nonstick surfaces, oven hoods, and dishwasher doors. Please check the back of the bottle for more information, including a full list of appropriate and inappropriate uses."

Tim

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Most times for me, it is not "is it a waste of money," but "is it a waste of space?" I have a gift certificate from Bed Bath and Beyond, and I looked at the gadgets. Geez. They take up a lot of space for a single task that parking and chef's knives, and perhaps a spoon can do. Post and pans; I have a mishmash of things I love, but I sure don't want to find space for a mango splitter.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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This is nonsense.

*

Freakin hilarious. Dawn is a standard cleaner.

Heading back to WS soon, thank you. Either way, no Super Uber Beware-Intact Power Dissolver in the house.

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Most times for me, it is not "is it a waste of money," but "is it a waste of space?"  I have a gift certificate from Bed Bath and Beyond, and I looked at the gadgets.  Geez.  They take up a lot of space for a single task that parking and chef's knives, and perhaps a spoon can do.  Post and pans; I have a mishmash of things I love, but I sure don't want to find space for a mango splitter.

:laugh: that is the perfect example of 'one person's waste is another person's prize' - I adore my mango splitter and now have mango much more often than ever before. It is a 'worth every penny' item for me!

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We've touched on this on other threads, but some gadgets are a waste for some people and a godsend for others. One of my friends laughed at my battery-powered pepper mill, but only until I explained that when I have an arthritis flare-up, it's the only way I can grind pepper.

We don't have an electric or battery powered can opener, and have no plans to get one anytime soon. With the increasing use of pop-top cans, we may never get one. But there have been times when turning the handle on the manual can opener has brought tears down my cheeks. I've found out the hard way not to do stuff like that if it hurts, because over-stressing one joint can produce a whole-body flare-up that lasts for weeks and takes a dangerous amount of NSAIDs and Tylenol to chase away. Most of the time, I can use a manual can opener with no problem. Next time it hurts, though, if Mr. jgm isn't home, one of the neighbors will have to open the can.

I used to think the electric jar openers were a ridiculous waste of money, until I watched a friend of mine who has rheumatoid arthritis hold a jar between her forearms and use one of those things. Even with the opener, it was a struggle for her, but at least the opener made it possible for her to get the jar open.

Jenny

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We've touched on this on other threads, but some gadgets are a waste for some people and a godsend for others.  One of my friends laughed at my battery-powered pepper mill, but only until I explained that when I have an arthritis flare-up, it's the only way I can grind pepper. 

We don't have an electric or battery powered can opener, and have no plans to get one anytime soon.  With the increasing use of pop-top cans, we may never get one.  But there have been times when turning the handle on the manual can opener has brought tears down my cheeks.  I've found out the hard way not to do stuff like that if it hurts, because over-stressing one joint can produce a whole-body flare-up that lasts for weeks and takes a dangerous amount of NSAIDs and Tylenol to chase away.  Most of the time, I can use a manual can opener with no problem.  Next time it hurts, though, if Mr. jgm isn't home, one of the neighbors will have to open the can.

I used to think the electric jar openers were a ridiculous waste of money, until I watched a friend of mine who has rheumatoid arthritis hold a jar between her forearms and use one of those things.  Even with the opener, it was a struggle for her, but at least the opener made it possible for her to get the jar open.

Jenny

I love my "One-Touch" can opener which I can start and leave alone to do its job and then return to lift it off the can with the lid attached to its magnet. I first got one of the cheapies then opted for the deluxe version.

I also have the power jar opener for the same reason, severe arthritis at the base of my right thumb and weakness in my left hand from atrophied muscles because of nerve damage. They are a godsend for me.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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My vote goes for what I consider overpriced cookware, whether it be All-Clad, Calphalon, or any of the stuff that is hawked by the Food Network.

Most cooks, like most golfers believe that by purchasing high end cookware (or golfclubs) it will improve their game. Maybe it does to a degree, but it won't replace a good knowledge of the fundamentals.

A $500 putter won't sink a putt any better than a $10 putter if you can't putt.

Consequentally, a $100 pan will not cook any better than a $10 pan if you don't understand the basics of cooking.

With that being said, here is one of my favorite "all clad" pans.

It is about 10 years old, and the exterior is "all clad" with burnt on carbon and gunk, hence its even heating properties.

It started out life as a $15 non-stick Bialetti fry pan and since our pairing, it has spent countless hours in the Salamander finishing off gorgeous fritatta's, omelet's Croque Monsier's, egg scrambles and any other concoction I thought to put in it.

It has produced thousand's of delicately veined paper thin 10" crepes, and even made many servings of scrambled eggs.

The dent is the result of a discussion we had when something "stuck" in it.

I don't remember what it was, but after the attitude adjustment (banging it on the edge of the garbage can) our failure to communicate was resolved and nothing ever stuck again.

However, my kitchen staff would no longer use my well seasoned and fresh with a new attitude pan. Said they were too embarrassed.

Fine says I, I'll just take my pan and go home!

So here she is in all her glory (are all pans named after women?).

Still making beautiful crepes, eggs, and any other concoction I can think of here at the home base.

gallery_49811_6671_32145.jpg

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We've touched on this on other threads, but some gadgets are a waste for some people and a godsend for others. One of my friends laughed at my battery-powered pepper mill, but only until I explained that when I have an arthritis flare-up, it's the only way I can grind pepper.

I have psoriatic arthritis and I LOVE my electric peppermill. I dont think anyone who has ever seen it would call it a waste of money( although they might think the tellicherry pepper was).

So many of the gadgets that I do have, are so much more helpful to me because of my arthritis.

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Lovely. It reminds me of the time I was cooking in the kitchen of a friend's restaurant and all the old standard aluminum restaurant pans were so warped they were more like metal bowls, but it didn't matter. The burners on the commercial range distributed the heat quite evenly, and as long as the guy on the saute station pays attention and keeps things moving, nothing burns.

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We've touched on this on other threads, but some gadgets are a waste for some people and a godsend for others. One of my friends laughed at my battery-powered pepper mill, but only until I explained that when I have an arthritis flare-up, it's the only way I can grind pepper.

I have psoriatic arthritis and I LOVE my electric peppermill. I dont think anyone who has ever seen it would call it a waste of money( although they might think the tellicherry pepper was).

So many of the gadgets that I do have, are so much more helpful to me because of my arthritis.

I have more than one "electric" peppermill - I like the ones that dispense the pepper from the top when inverted as there is no button to push.

As for spending too much on tellicherry, I buy a lot of "exotic" peppers and use them all. If they get used, they are not a waste of money.

Pepper-Passion is my drug of choice! :wub:

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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