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TAPrice

Popsicles

173 posts in this topic

On 14 June 2009 at 9:45 AM, prasantrin said:

There's a drink one can buy at Asian grocery stores consisting of coconut water and pieces of young coconut. There are canned versions, but there's another version that's often sold frozen.

http://www.evertake.com/pdDrink_coconut.html

is one example (Rooster/Cock makes a really good version). It's supposed to be defrosted, but we also eat it like a coconut slush.

Anyway, if you can get young coconut, save the water and scrape out all the meat. Then freeze it. You can add sugar syrup if you want.

Or just buy canned coconut water (with or without meat) and freeze it.

For daily eating, I like it better than coconut-milk versions because it's so light and refreshing.

Good to hear, we may try this.

Thanks. 


Kerala Auxiliary Marine Service.

Assisting- Citizen Disaster Survival Force.

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On 1 July 2011 at 6:20 PM, Panaderia Canadiense said:

Coconut as a popsicle works very well if you've got access to a whole coconut to puree - what you want for the popsicle is basically heavy coconut cream (the very thick, very creamy stuff) - then it freezes like a dream. In Salcedo (a little town that is the home of the best popsicles in South America), this is how they're done, with the inclusion of shredded coconut and a bit of sugar (to taste). Coconut is one of my faves, and done this way it freezes hard enough to be handleable and remains soft enough that you don't get the straw-mouthfull thing.

Banana is one of those things that discolours when frozen, and the best approach to it is simply to freeze whole or half bananas, sprinkled with lime juice, wrapped in Saran, and with a stick stuck up them. The minute you go to puree with the bananas available in North America, you'll end up with a really unappetizing brown moosh. This goes for them when added to other fruits. Even large amounts of citrus juice or Vit C doesn't help Cavendish and Gran Naine bananas - they'll still oxidize super rapidly.

On the unsweetened popsicles end, I'd say check out Maracuya (passionfruit) if you can find it, and also try doing Lavender with Mint (super-refreshing!).

Sounds extremely good.

Thanks. 


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Assisting- Citizen Disaster Survival Force.

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On 28 August 2016 at 3:33 PM, blue_dolphin said:

Chocolate-dipped peanut butter & banana pops:

IMG_3610.jpg

I got the recipe for these over on The Kitchn.  It's basically that one-ingredient frozen banana ice cream that was all over the place a few years ago with the addition of some peanut butter and frozen into popsicle molds. 

Just the kind of thing we are looking for.

 

Very happy to find this post and thread. 

 

Cheers Blue Dolphin. 

 

Alex. 

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On ‎8‎/‎28‎/‎2016 at 7:33 AM, blue_dolphin said:

Chocolate-dipped peanut butter & banana pops:

IMG_3610.jpg

I got the recipe for these over on The Kitchn.  It's basically that one-ingredient frozen banana ice cream that was all over the place a few years ago with the addition of some peanut butter and frozen into popsicle molds. 

 

Nice.  How did you get the chocolate to adhere to the pops?  I read somewhere that oil has to be added  the chocolate to get it to attach well to the ice cream.  In any case, did you treat the chocolate in any way, or use a specific chocolate for this purpose?  Likewise, how did you get the nuts to stay put?


Edited by Shel_B (log)
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 ... Shel


 

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6 hours ago, Shel_B said:

 

Nice.  How did you get the chocolate to adhere the chocolate e to the pops?  I read somewhere that oil has to be added  the chocolate to get it to attach well to the ice cream.  In any case, did you treat the chocolate in any way, or use a specific chocolate for this purpose?  Likewise, how did you get the nuts to stay put?

 

 

I added some coconut oil to the melted chocolate as described here, 1 oz/4 oz chocolate,  so I'd get a thinner shell.  After unmolding, I put the pops back in the freezer on a wax paper covered baking sheet.  Then I dipped them in the chocolate, immediately into the chopped nuts.  Once they were all dipped, they went back in the freezer.

 

Edited to add that the recipe I linked to for the pops just calls for dipping into melted chocolate and I'm sure that would work fine as well.


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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24 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I added some coconut oil to the melted chocolate as described here, 1 oz/4 oz chocolate,  so I'd get a thinner shell.  After unmolding, I put the pops back in the freezer on a wax paper covered baking sheet.  Then I dipped them in the chocolate, immediately into the chopped nuts.  Once they were all dipped, they went back in the freezer.

 

Thanks so much BD.  While reading and researching info about popsicles, etc., I found the article but had not yet read it.  Seems like Serious Eats has some good information on the subject.  I have learned more (that's relevant and interesting to me) from Serious Eats than from the People's Pops book.


Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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56 minutes ago, Shel_B said:

I have learned more (that's relevant and interesting to me) from Serious Eats than from the People's Pops book.

 

Since I love fruit popsicles, I've gotten a lot out of that book and highly recommend it but I think there is much to be gained from seeking info from many sources and I'm glad that you've found a source that's most helpful to you.  

Do share your experiences if you try the Serious Eats fudgsicles that you posted about upthread.  Fudgsicles aren't generally my thing but if I could make one that tasted like the old Swensen's Swiss Orange Chip ice cream.....mmmmm....that might be nice :x!

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Finally tried out my new popsicle molds with a pineapple, coconut, and calamondin mix. I definitely need more practice getting these out of the mold! Will find out tomorrow if I have better luck with the more traditionally shaped popsicles. Still, such a cute mold (if I may say so).  :)

IMG_2074 - pineapple coconut astronaut popsicle.jpg

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5 minutes ago, curls said:

Finally tried out my new popsicle molds with a pineapple, coconut, and calamondin mix. :)

 

 

What is calamondin?


 ... Shel


 

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I've been making various flavors all summer, I've just been lazy with the pictures. I am now making my 'complex syrup' (filtered water, jaggery, a touch of molasses, and gum arabic) in quarts to accommodate cocktails and fruit sorbet pops.

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I can't seem to get my popsicle-making act together. I need to reduce any recipe so it is more suitable for a singleton  and then I need to coordinate freezer space and fruit so that I have the two of them together. :)

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6 hours ago, curls said:

Finally tried out my new popsicle molds with a pineapple, coconut, and calamondin mix. I definitely need more practice getting these out of the mold! Will find out tomorrow if I have better luck with the more traditionally shaped popsicles. Still, such a cute mold (if I may say so).  :)

IMG_2074 - pineapple coconut astronaut popsicle.jpg

 

It is a very cute mold, but I did wonder, "Now how is she going to get the spaceman with his 'nipped in waist of a neck' out of a solid mold. It looks like the rockets would come out easier because they are all tapered at the bottom of the molds. If the mold were in two pieces with a seal somehow devised, the shapes would be endless. I'm willing to bet that your pineapple, coconut and calamansi creation was very delicious.

 

Do you have a tree that is hardy in your area, or did you purchase the calamansi? I never see any around here. 


> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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16 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

It is a very cute mold, but I did wonder, "Now how is she going to get the spaceman with his 'nipped in waist of a neck' out of a solid mold. It looks like the rockets would come out easier because they are all tapered at the bottom of the molds. If the mold were in two pieces with a seal somehow devised, the shapes would be endless. I'm willing to bet that your pineapple, coconut and calamansi creation was very delicious.

 

Do you have a tree that is hardy in your area, or did you purchase the calamansi? I never see any around here. 

The astronaut mold is actually a silicone mold -- not a solid mold. So, you can just push it out of the holder & turn it inside out to release the popsicle. I think it would have worked great with a super solid filling (the coconut cream made my mix a little creamy & softer than a pure fruit juice mix).

 

As for the calamondin/calamansi, I purchased the tree/bush/shrub at the local nursery & as soon as it got warm enough, put the potted plant outside. It has been doing very well. I will bring it back inside for the winter & if it survives, back outside it will go as soon as it is warm enough. Many people seem to do quite well with them in colder climes if they bring the plant indoors during the winter. When I lived in Florida, we just had one in the yard, and it flourished. You can make wonderful marmalade with it if you are willing to deal with extracting all the pits.

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It was 105°F here yesterday so I made more popsicles.  Thomcord grape with ruby port

IMG_3785.jpg

They are very purple-y! 

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Roasted strawberry, Pimm's and black pepper.

 

And the roster of my planned popsicles this summer.

 

IMG_0986.JPG

 

IMG_0987.JPG

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This is a dangerous thread. We eat a lot of popsicles of the purchased all fruit variety and for some reason it never occurred to me we could make our own...

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On 28/08/2016 at 11:55 AM, blue_dolphin said:

Banana popsicles would be fun to play with.  I was thinking mango and coconut would be a good addition instead of the peanut butter.  Or strawberries....or Nutella....

FWIW, I tried the one-ingredient banana ice cream with mango last year. I found that the combination was less than the sum of its parts...the woodsy, pine-like note in the mangos brought out the similar note in dead-ripe bananas, and somehow the whole thing was astringent like over-steeped tea. I've always found underripe bananas rather astringent as well, but I suspect you could probably make it work with just-ripe bananas and some kind of additional sweetening. 

 

I wasn't interested enough to pursue it further at that time.

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Fat=flavor

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It's that time of year.....

Apricot & salted caramel pops from People's Pops:

IMG_5751.thumb.jpg.8e16d1079a6d43ab743ed5234ab79181.jpg

 

I was curious to try this version but I don't think I will make them again as they are a bit too sweet for me.  I'll give them another taste sometime when I feel like dessert....maybe dipped in bourbon?

There is also a recipe for apple and salted caramel pops in this book and I'll give them a try sometime. 

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1 hour ago, blue_dolphin said:

It's that time of year.....

Apricot & salted caramel pops from People's Pops:

IMG_5751.thumb.jpg.8e16d1079a6d43ab743ed5234ab79181.jpg

 

I was curious to try this version but I don't think I will make them again as they are a bit too sweet for me.  I'll give them another taste sometime when I feel like dessert....maybe dipped in bourbon?

There is also a recipe for apple and salted caramel pops in this book and I'll give them a try sometime. 

I bet you'll like the apple version a bit better --if it uses a tart apple?

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22 hours ago, Shelby said:

I bet you'll like the apple version a bit better --if it uses a tart apple?

Yes, plus I was thinking to drizzle some of the salted caramel over the pops after unmolding them but these apricot guys are almost the same color as the caramel so it wouldn't stand out at all!  

 

Today's pops, also from People's Pops. Both call for cantaloupe and I used a Saticoy melon from the local farmers market.  It's similar to cantaloupe but sweeter.

Cantaloupe & mint - these are sweetened with mint-infused simple syrup

596bbd289e350_IMG_5753(1).thumb.jpg.30f83615e6e903b2b3221a87ae269307.jpg

 

And for cocktail hour, Cantaloupe & Campari

IMG_5752.thumb.jpg.3946c3b52c1f77678c3c3b70a6b00410.jpg

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Strawberries & cream from People's Pops:

IMG_5754.thumb.jpg.058c28697cf24c6682f33efd8dcd9e7e.jpg

I've made these before but they are worth making again. 

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