Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Fountain Restaurant


Recommended Posts

Craig LeBan's recent four-bell review reminded me that this restaurant needed some dusting off on eGullet.

Since the old Fountain thread didn't seem to get much traffic, with the start of a new chef, Rafael Gonzalez, I thought I might help this restaurant turn a new leaf, as it were.CLICK HERE.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish LaBan had included breakfast in his review.  The Philadelphia Four Season's serves one of the finest in the US.  There are few greater dining experiences than a perfectly executed hotel breakfast.

Here, here. And I would love a review of "hotel brunches," as well. I want a comparison of the new Lacroix, with the new Swan brunch... and any other destination that deserves mention.

Edited by cwdonald (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of my favorite memories is my grandmother's Sunday brunch treat at Hotel DuPont's green room in the 70s.

"That's a slice of truffle on your eggs Benedict, Charles," she taught me.

I'll bet you can still get a great brunch there next week during the Clifford Brown jazz fest.

Charlie, the Main Line Mummer

We must eat; we should eat well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of my favorite memories is my grandmother's Sunday brunch treat at Hotel DuPont's green room in the 70s.

"That's a slice of truffle on your eggs Benedict, Charles," she taught me. 

I'll bet you can still get a great brunch there next week during the Clifford Brown jazz fest.

Wow....I forgot about the Green Room. That place really took a dive in the past 20 years! It's a shame...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of my favorite memories is my grandmother's Sunday brunch treat at Hotel DuPont's green room in the 70s.

"That's a slice of truffle on your eggs Benedict, Charles," she taught me. 

I'll bet you can still get a great brunch there next week during the Clifford Brown jazz fest.

Wow....I forgot about the Green Room. That place really took a dive in the past 20 years! It's a shame...

You mean its brunch? Because I've been there for dinner a whole lot more recently than that, and the place was virtually unchanged from my experiences in years past. Very solid food, if a little stodgy, and charmingly old-fashioned service.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone have a ballpark figure for what a tasting menu for 2 would cost here? I'm thinking about setting something up for my parents' 30th anniversary.

I would kill everyone in this room for a drop of sweet beer...

Homer Simpson

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My wife and I went to the Fountain last night for dinner; our first visit since Chef Gonzalez took the reigns. We both had the tasting menu (6 courses for $115; optional wine pairings with each course would take it to $190) and were quite pleased. The "Tempura of Tuna and Nori with shiitake mushroom, carrot and cabbage salad, and rice wine vinaigrette" was my favorite dish of the night, the "Sauteed Lemon Snapper, with shellfish bouillabaise, rouille crouton" was a close second. The "Pan Seared Rabbit Tenderloin" was fine (I am not a big fan of rabbit -- give me hare any day) but the accompanying "foie gras and rabbit confit terrine with cherry compote" gave the dish a bit more punch. The "stuffed double lamb chop with eggplant, feta, pine nuts, fennel pool and thyme jus" was an absolutely perfect match with an '86 Cheval Blanc (a treasure from my cellar -- corkage $35). Cheese course was "truffled Saint Andre" and paired with a lovely cauliflower soup; finished up with a "molten white chocolate tarte with butter pecan ice cream and rasberry compote."

The wine list remains impressively thick, but there was a new section devoted to wines $60 and under. The sommelier steered us towards a small grower Champagne "Diebolt-Vallois Champagne Brut Tradition" which was a pleasant surprise, and well below the price range I had mentioned to him. They did an excellent job with the '86 Cheval Blanc, and decanted it (candles and all) table-side.

All in all it was a wonderful dinner; the service was top-notch, and the food as good as ever. The Tuna and Snapper dishes reminded me of Jean Georges in that the liquids/sauces were light but incredibly flavorful. In short, the Fountain will continue to remain towards the very top of my "short list" for fine dining in Philadelphia.

Edited by tbabes (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...