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Cocktails That End Up in the Sink


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I was thinking about how I would make a Carpano Silver sour. I would riff off a NY sour and float the Antica.

2.0 oz Whiskey (here it would depend on what you want. Big spicy to show through? Rittenhouse. Softer and more like a platfom on which the Carpano will shine. Beam Rye.)

.75 oz Lemon

1.0 oz simple

eggwhite

Float: Carpano

Mime, add Ice, shake, strain into a coupe + sidecar, float Carpano, lemon or orange twist.

Toby

A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

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Thanks for the info Toby...I'll see if one of the guys wants to give it a second try on Thursday.

I was thinking about how I would make a Carpano Silver sour.  I would riff off a NY sour and float the Antica.

Edited by KD1191 (log)

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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I was thinking about how I would make a Carpano Silver sour.  I would riff off a NY sour and float the Antica.

2.0 oz Whiskey (here it would depend on what you want.  Big spicy to show through? Rittenhouse.  Softer and more like a platfom on which the Carpano will shine.  Beam Rye.)

.75 oz Lemon

1.0 oz simple

eggwhite

Float: Carpano

Mime, add Ice, shake, strain into a coupe + sidecar, float Carpano, lemon or orange twist. 

 

Toby

With Antica standing in lieu of a dry claret, would you want to dial back a tad on the simple?

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Depends on the size of the egg white. But if you have 1 oz of egg white, 2 oz of booze and .75 oz of lemon, 1 oz of simple makes sense to me to achive balance. Though I have never made one so I can't be sure.

Toby

A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

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I was thinking about how I would make a Carpano Silver sour.  I would riff off a NY sour and float the Antica.

Asked the guys to whip this up tonight (with the Beam), and we toasted to you. It is indeed a tasty concoction, thank you. However, it isn't quite what I would call a 'Carpano Sour'. Yes, it's a rye sour with Carpano...and, perhaps that as good as I'm going to get, but I'm holding out hope that something more Carpano-forward comes forward. Any thoughts?

Edited by KD1191 (log)

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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I would put it solidly in the sour family with .75 oz lemon.

Toby

Toby, if you wouldn't mind, what are the rest of the specs on the Tongue in Cheek?

Tongue in Cheek

2 oz Weller Special Reserve Bourbon

.75 oz Fresh Lemon Juice

.75 oz Simple Syrup

.75 oz Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth

1 dash Angostura Bitters

1 Strawberry (Cut in half)

Top: Soda

Glass: Collins

Ice: Shard

Garnish: Mint Sprig Under the Shard, Mint Sprig on top of Drink

Shake briefly. Strain.

We tried shaking the mint in the cocktail, and also throwing it in after shaking and giving it a swirl. It works best to just put it on the bottom of the glass under the ice.

This is one of those drinks that on paper looks Meh. Then when you taste it it rocks your world. So simple & elegant. My hat off to Jane.

Cheers,

Toby

A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

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I would put it solidly in the sour family with .75 oz lemon.

Toby

Toby, if you wouldn't mind, what are the rest of the specs on the Tongue in Cheek?

Tongue in Cheek

2 oz Weller Special Reserve Bourbon

.75 oz Fresh Lemon Juice

.75 oz Simple Syrup

.75 oz Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth

1 dash Angostura Bitters

1 Strawberry (Cut in half)

Top: Soda

Glass: Collins

Ice: Shard

Garnish: Mint Sprig Under the Shard, Mint Sprig on top of Drink

Shake briefly. Strain.

We tried shaking the mint in the cocktail, and also throwing it in after shaking and giving it a swirl. It works best to just put it on the bottom of the glass under the ice.

This is one of those drinks that on paper looks Meh. Then when you taste it it rocks your world. So simple & elegant. My hat off to Jane.

Cheers,

Toby

thanks.

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Tried a New Pal from Art of the Bar, an equal parts Negroni riff with rye subbed in for the gin, Peychaud's, and a bit of pastis. I used Rittenhouse BIB, M&R rosso -- and a new, prized bottle of Marteau absinthe. Wrong, wrong, wrong: the ridiculously complex Marteau muddied the whole thing, leaving a sloppy, unpleasantly bitter mess.

A less spicy rye (Jim Beam?), the aforementioned Herbsaint, and perhaps a wee bit less of the Campari... maybe this works. But as made above, it all went down the drain.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Tried a New Pal from Art of the Bar, an equal parts Negroni riff with rye subbed in for the gin, Peychaud's, and a bit of pastis. I used Rittenhouse BIB, M&R rosso -- and a new, prized bottle of Marteau absinthe. Wrong, wrong, wrong: the ridiculously complex Marteau muddied the whole thing, leaving a sloppy, unpleasantly bitter mess.

A less spicy rye (Jim Beam?), the aforementioned Herbsaint, and perhaps a wee bit less of the Campari... maybe this works. But as made above, it all went down the drain.

Interesting because I was making Boulevardiers for some folks tonight with Sazerac Rye and was thinking how this combo came dangerously close to being an indespensable drink. Perhaps the absinthe and peychauds are tricky additions?

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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That's too bad about the New Pal - the Old Pal is one of my favourite drinks and severely underrated. I make mine using Robert Hess's recipe (1 rye, 3/4 each Campari and dry vermouth) and haven't directly compared but found an amazing synergy of flavours when using Cinzano Extra Dry that didn't quite come together with Noilly Prat. I was also using Jim Beam rye (the only rye not ridiculously priced in Australia).

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Yikes. I don't want to condemn the New Pal! It just happens not to be a good drink with those components; the recipe called for the decidedly less assertive Herbsaint, and I wanted to fiddle.

Perhaps, someday, the New Pal and I can be friends....

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I made the "Paul's Club" from the June Imbibe - 2 parts gin, 1 part concord vinegar, .25 parts simple (concord vinegar being white wine vinegar soaked for a week in smashed concord grapes).

It tasted like a drink that include an ounce of vinegar, which is to say, undrinkable.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Given my success rate with Zirbenz Stone Pine Liqueur, it's not going to take many more failed experiments to use up the bottle. Last night's offering to the sink involved wheat whiskey, lemon juice, Zirbenz, and pimento dram.

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  • 5 months later...

I tossed a Jupiter tonight, made with Tanqueray, Vya, Marie Bizzard Parfait Amour and fresh orange. I started with 1 tsp each of the last two. Blah. Doubled it. Still Blah -- a Martini with sweet yuk in it. I added a couple of dashes of Regan's. Gack. Either I'm using the completely wrong ingredients or it's just not my cup of tea.

Disappointed in my first attempt with my new bottle of Parfait Amour. Tasting it straight is certainly not encouraging.

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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I tossed a Jupiter tonight, made with Tanqueray, Vya, Marie Bizzard Parfait Amour and fresh orange. I started with 1 tsp each of the last two. Blah. Doubled it. Still Blah -- a Martini with sweet yuk in it. I added a couple of dashes of Regan's. Gack. Either I'm using the completely wrong ingredients or it's just not my cup of tea.

Disappointed in my first attempt with my new bottle of Parfait Amour. Tasting it straight is certainly not encouraging.

I would lay a week's earnings on Vya being the culprit. Try again with Dolin or Noilly Prat...though it's a strange drink regardless.

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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2 oz Macallan cask strength

1/2 oz R&W Orchard Pear

1/2 oz Ramazotti

Oh... no. No, no, no. No.

This post is so sad.

:(

Good lesson for me. I'll start by making a 1/4-sized trial drink to avoid diluting the expensive ingredients with tears. I tossed a Brooklyn too. Maybe the Vya was at fault with that too. Hmmmm.

It also raises another point of confusion for me. When you see "Apricot Brandy" I never know if the original recipe intended a liqueur like Orchard Apricot or a spirit like an eau-de-vie. I really wish that ingredients had much less sugar in them to let me add what I want. The flavors in that drink seem intriguing, but, oh my that's a lot of sugar and no acid.

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Hm, well, "a Martini with sweet yuk in it," is pretty much a fine definition of a Jupiter.

It's a tricky drink, and I think your use of Vya and Tanqueray are probably the problems.

Use a softer gin, say Plymouth, and a "normal" French Vermouth, as Andy suggests.

Still, it's a pretty subtle drink, and keeping both the orange and Parfait Amour nearly undetectable is the key.

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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[...]

It also raises another point of confusion for me. When you see "Apricot Brandy" I never know if the original recipe intended a liqueur like Orchard Apricot or a spirit like an eau-de-vie. I really wish that ingredients had much less sugar in them to let me add what I want. The flavors in that drink seem intriguing, but, oh my that's a lot of sugar and no acid.

I think it is fair to assume, unless a cocktail recipe specifically says, "dry apricot brandy," or, "apricot eau-de-vie," what is meant is apricot liqueur.

There are a few exceptions, like the Hop Toad, but I don't think it has ever been particularly common to mix with apricot eau-de-vie. I like to experiment, though. A lot of times drinks I don't like with apricot liqueur, I do like with apricot eau-de-vie, authentic or not.

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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My husband continues on a Manhattan kick, and has been making textbook drinks with Rye, sweet vermouth and Angostura Bitters. We ran out of sweet vermouth and he used the only other vermouth we had, NP dry. He's very frugal, so he would rather drink medicine--which this drink resembled--than toss it, but I can't believe how long it took him to get one drink down. It was amazingly bad.

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Hm, well, "a Martini with sweet yuk in it," is pretty much a fine definition of a Jupiter.

Perhaps we chould just change the name to "Sweet Yuktini" and be done with it. :biggrin:

I bought a bottle of Dolin to try tonight with Sapphire. Not optimistic. I also dumped a Brooklyn :sad: also made with Vya and 1 1/2 tsp Ramazzotti + 1/2 tsp Cointreau + 3 dashes Angostura Orange to simulate the Amer Picon. I wonder if the Vya is at fault here or my approximation of the Amer Picon. It was simply terrible, and I've heard such good things about the Brooklyn.

Manhattan ... NP dry. It was amazingly bad.

If you add Campari, you've got an Old Pal, a wonderful drink. 2:1:1 There is just enough sugar in the Campari to overcome the flinty dry combination of Rye and Dry Vermouth. And the bitter tones of the Campari love rye.

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Retried the Jupiter with Sapphire and Dolin. I'd say it went from sink cleaner to drinkable. It's not a drink I would revisit anytime soon, although I can imagine someone like it if they're into sweeter things. I also tried it with R&W Violette, and didn't care for it. (I like Violette only in tiny quantities, like behind the puckering sour of an Aviation.

I did a little ingredient tasting (Tanqueray versus Sapphire) and Vya Dry versus Dolin Dry versus Boissiere Dry versus M&R Bianco (which I'd never tried before). I can now see why Vya could mess up a drink that would perfectly well with Dolin. I love Boissiere in a Martini (and in a pretty good proportion). I Martini with Vya would be good, too, but very different. I look forward to hunting for uses for the M&R Bianco (lordy is it sweet).

While I was at it, I also tasted Boissiere Sweet versus Carpano Antica versus Punt e Mes. Very interesting. I think Antica may be very useful, with it complex flavors and bitter underpinnings.

Alas, I didn't dump anything into the sink tonight.

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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