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The Egg Sandwich


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  • 2 weeks later...
mustard

Mustard? Hmm, I've never tried that. Mayo, yes. Mustard, no.

What kind of mustard?

I like Grey Poupon - tangy and salty and a bit of bite.

My friend preferred French's.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Hi

I only have 2 rules with fried egg butties and they are

1. They must be runny in the middle

2. You must have another piece of bread on the plate underneath to catch all the yolk dripping out giving you another buttie!

Steven

Edited by codheadred (log)
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I eat how I grew up: Vietnamese style.

French baguette, grilled sirloin medium rare sliced thinly, eggs sunny side up, black pepper and Maggi.

When I'm not being fancy, baguette and scallion omelette, black pepper and Maggi.

And when it's 2am and there's nothing but sliced white bread: toasted open face sunny side up, pepper n Maggi.

Fried hard yolks? No thanks.

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  • 2 months later...

The NY Times weighs in in today's Metropolitan section thusly:

Bacon, egg and cheese on a roll, toasted, with ketchup and mayo. The cash register clangs.

Whether I agree or not, check out the story right here.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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One of the 'older' men in my reading group (mystery book club) brings his own lunch because he doesn't care for the food where we usually meet for our "brunch/lunch" meetings twice a year (at a Honduran restaurant that lets us have a small "room" for free.

His sandwiches are inevitably egg and bacon or egg and ham and are multi-stacked like a club sandwich. The last one was a triple-decker, that is, three layers of "filling" - four slices of toast. :blink: He says he has one of these every day for breakfast or lunch.

When I say older, I mean older than me (71) I was born in 1939, he fought in WWII so I know he is older but is very cagey about his age! :biggrin:

He always buys a salad to go with this construction. Frankly, I don't know how he keeps it together but so he does. And also uses a combination of condiments that are somewhat unusual: butter PLUS mayo, hot sauce on the eggs, and when topped with ham, a dollop of mustard on the ham. No ketchup but he has at times used what I would call "cocktail sauce" as it contains horseradish.

He doesn't like the usual fare at the restaurant because he says "spicy food" does not agree with his digestion. Good God - I can't imagine anything being more of a shock to the digestion than those sandwiches. :shock:

He is also quite tall and fairly thin so the calories haven't had an effect.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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In the British military the Egg Sandwich is known as 'An Egg Banjo'

Runny yolk mandatory, perhaps brown sauce, oily finger prints from your colleague who cooked it in your tank.

To have the yolk run down your chest is a sign of pride.

An Egg Banjo

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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Brown sauce in a UK context is a bottled sweetish, vinegary condiment. The best known brand is HP but there are many others. Filthy stuff in my opinion. But its popular. Greasy spoon cafes will have it on the table. Better quality places will not.

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It has a huge following in the UK, among Anglophiles worldwide, and in various pockets elsewhere. There are fan sites and everything. I can't think of an equivalent US condiment. It's maybe a little like a less tomatoey A-1 with a much milder flavor with prominent dried-fruit notes.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Quite a few years ago, when I lived in the Valley, a couple of neighbors from the UK would have Daddies sauce shipped to them because it was difficult to find in the US back then.

Frankly, I never saw the attraction and I don't care for the so-called "steak" sauces because to me it ruins good beef. Now if the meat is somewhat "iffy" I can see that it would be an advantage to mask the basic flavor of the meat.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Had a good one for breakfast this morning, prepared by my friend Sean who is a real egg-sandwich aficionado:

eggsandwich.jpg

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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In theory I love the idea of other kinds of English muffins. But I've been so conditioned by Thomas's that I rarely enjoy the better ones. I generally experience them as too greasy or too dry.

The bacon was Leidy's. http://www.alderfermeats.com/leidys-bacon

The eggs were from Marcus Dairy, though produced by someone else. http://www.marcusdairy.com/

Land O' Lakes white American cheese from the deli counter at Stop & Shop.

There was also a little Marcus Dairy butter on the English muffin.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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  • 2 years later...

I know this thread began 4 yrs. ago, and the last post w 3 yrs. But, unless I missed it, I don't think anyone does it the way I learned:

Two slices sturdy white bread - Pepperidge Farm original is perfect.

Heat up a Cast Iron pan, & when it gets good & warm, chuck in a knob of butter.

Just before the butter gets past sizzling, crack a really fresh egg into the middle of the puddle of butter.

Sprinkle in a tiny pinch of salt & a small grind of pepper. Use spatulas to sort of smoosh the edges to make it ultimately fit the bread.

When the egg had started to firm up (and this is KEY!) - flip the egg over and smash it down with the spatula.

("Turned Over & Stepped On")

More S&P "to taste". - (Do not actually taste at this point...you probably know how to season your egg.). <GG>

When the egg is Solid - hard cooked - lift out of the skillet, onto one of the slices of fresh, soft, white bread. Cover with the other.

Savor. Yum.

::::sigh::::

Excuse me...heading for the kitchen.

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currently my favorite way is: everything bagel, sliced in half and toasted, smeared with a thick spread of unsalted butter, with a fried egg and a couple of slices of cheddar.

paired with an OJ and a banana, that'll last me through second breakfast and elevenses. hobbits are eating machines, remember? :wink:

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my favourite lately is a couple of thin slices of mennonite all beef summer sausage cooked to a crispy round, over easy egg cooked in the fat from the summer sausage and a light dab of butter, on buttered sourdough toast. no mayo unless there is good tomatoes available then I will add a slice and a smear. s&p

"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

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up early and after talkign about it a few days ago I had a craving.

ingredient pic is a bit blurry but you get the idea

GEDC3981_zps19855640.jpg

GEDC3982_zpsc1d9fb2d.jpg

"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

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I wanted an egg sandwich for breakfast yesterday but didn't have bread. So I made two round cheese chicharron, put fried eggs on top and then added hot sauce. May not have been a traditional sandwich but it was great.

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Local chain Dunkin Donuts is now offering the donut sandwich, "pepper-fried egg and cherrywood-smoked bacon, between two slices of glazed doughnut."

I debated whether to post this in the Culinary Signs of the Apocalypse topic, but since apparently it's quite a hit, I'm obviously in the minority in finding the idea disgusting.


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