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gfron1

Euro conversion help please: Granité

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Recipe reads:

====

syrup 30°B, lemon juice

Mix syrup and lime juice to 18°B and prepare as granité

====

Okay, ignoring the lemon and lime switching, what does the B stand for and are they saying get the syrup to 30° and then lower it to 18°? Is B really C to us Americans?

BTW, this is from the Pastry in Europe book reviewed HERE.

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Recipe reads:

====

syrup 30°B, lemon juice

Mix syrup and lime juice to 18°B and prepare as granité

====

Okay, ignoring the lemon and lime switching, what does the B stand for and are they saying get the syrup to 30° and then lower it to 18°?  Is B really C to us Americans?

BTW, this is from the Pastry in Europe book reviewed HERE.

B is Baume - a measure of density. Not around any books so I can't look up the Brix or Specific gravity equivents for you right now.

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I would assume the B is Baume, according to Wybauw a syrup of 30B is about 45% water. Perhaps they want you to add lemon juice to the 30B syrup until the measurement comes down to 18 Baume.

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The °B is the percentage of sugar in the syrup, a 50°B syrup would be equal parts sugar and water.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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those degrees and percentages don't add up very well.

Ron, in the future I would pay more attention to percentages of sugar than degrees of baume or brix. I don't even have a refractometer or densometer, but all my frozen products and syrups seem to be right on every time because I pay attention constantly to my percentages.


Edited by chiantiglace (log)

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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those degrees and percentages don't add up very well.

Ron, in the future I would pay more attention to percentages of sugar than degrees of baume or brix.  I don't even have a refractometer or densometer, but all my frozen products and syrups seem to be right on every time because I pay attention constantly to my percentages.

What do you mean the degrees and percentages don't add up?

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I'm not an expert on all things syrup but, at least for the purposes of sorbets, granitas and things of that nature, the degrees and percentages work out just fine when converting a formula or recipe. If a recipe calls for a syrup at 30° and you plug in a syrup at 30% there will be no problems.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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30 d B = 1 liter water + 1.35 kg sugar. But if you're going to use Baume syrups a bunch for glacage etc. from PIE or other Euro books, get one of these.

Life will be easier.


Edited by tan319 (log)

2317/5000

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not degrees and percentages in general. The two examples given are not parallel.


Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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To convert between degrees BRIX and Baumé units:

Baumé = 0.55 x Brix

Brix = Baumé / 0.55


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Ok, I admit that I don't do a lot of ice creams, sorbets and granités so please help to educate me.

I would have assumed that the 'B' in gfron1's original recipe was Brix, not Baumé. (I also thought that Baumé was deprecated and now, modern recipes use Brix.)

I know* that for a sorbet, a good range for brix is ~28 - 31º Brix. And for a granité, around 18º Brix.

So for his original question, perhaps take a 30º Brix syrup, add some lemon (or lime) juice to taste, then add water until you reach 18º Brix, chill and spin.

Agree, disagree?

*since I had to look it up when I made Quince Sorbet this weekend (from quinces in my back yard :cool: , but I digress...)


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I assumed it was referring to brix as well.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Ok, I admit that I don't do a lot of ice creams, sorbets and granités so please help to educate me.

I would have assumed that the 'B' in gfron1's original recipe was Brix, not Baumé.  (I also thought that Baumé was deprecated and now, modern recipes use Brix.)

I know* that for a sorbet, a good range for brix is ~28 - 31º Brix.  And for a granité, around 18º Brix.

So for his original question, perhaps take a 30º Brix syrup, add some lemon (or lime) juice to taste, then add water until you reach 18º Brix, chill and spin.

Agree, disagree?

*since I had to look it up when I made Quince Sorbet this weekend (from quinces in my back yard :cool: , but I digress...)

I think you are right B in this recipe is brix although the traditional brix symbol would normally be Bxº. Symbol for Baume is Bº or Beº

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Ok, I admit that I don't do a lot of ice creams, sorbets and granités so please help to educate me.

I would have assumed that the 'B' in gfron1's original recipe was Brix, not Baumé.  (I also thought that Baumé was deprecated and now, modern recipes use Brix.)

I know* that for a sorbet, a good range for brix is ~28 - 31º Brix.  And for a granité, around 18º Brix.

So for his original question, perhaps take a 30º Brix syrup, add some lemon (or lime) juice to taste, then add water until you reach 18º Brix, chill and spin.

Agree, disagree?

*since I had to look it up when I made Quince Sorbet this weekend (from quinces in my back yard :cool: , but I digress...)

I think you are right B in this recipe is brix although the traditional brix symbol would normally be Bxº. Symbol for Baume is Bº or Beº

Thanks, Kerry! :biggrin:


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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The B is Baume!

PH uses baume as his syrup measurement, brix for PDF

An easy way to decipher the baume question is look at the Conticini recipes in PIE.

BTW, if you don't already have it, get the softcover of The Ducasse/Roberts 'Grand Livre de Dessert et Patisserie.

It breaks down lot of this with excellent charts, etc.

There is an English version but I don't like translations much

PA: Baume hasn't been relegated to the attic yet.


Edited by tan319 (log)

2317/5000

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I am bumping up this topic again!

I have a recipe I want to try that calls for Sryup 30° B. Does this mean 30% sugar and 70% water? I still do not have a brix thermometer...

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I am bumping up this topic again!

I have a recipe I want to try that calls for Sryup 30° B. Does this mean 30% sugar and 70% water? I still do not have a brix thermometer...

There's two formulas here...


2317/5000

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It's not a big issue when you're making a lemon sorbet but part of the reason to use baume/brix rather than just by weight is because fruit naturally has sugar and that needs to be taken into account when making sorbets/granites.


PS: I am a guy.

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Is there some formula? Almost double sugar to water? Thanks

Don't know sorry, that's just the formula we use for syrup 30B at work. The baume scale makes little sense to me.

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